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Baldwin Hills Ca Development And Redevelopment

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NEWS
December 5, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
With a little help from political and law enforcement officials, the leader of the Baldwin Village Apartment Owners Assn. says the village can clean up its sordid image next year. "We can make this a model community," said association president Ralph Isaacs. "With the involvement of the police and the city councilman, we'll be able to make a real difference."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state energy commissioner who presided over public hearings at which hundreds of people angrily opposed a proposed power plant in the Baldwin Hills said Wednesday night he will recommend that his panel reject the project. The 40-page statement issued by Commissioner Robert Pernell concludes that the power plant could not pass muster with air quality officials. The Energy Commission is scheduled to make a final decision on the plant in Sacramento on Friday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite offering some of the best views in the Los Angeles Basin, the Baldwin Hills have had a tough time earning their due respect. They've been scalped and terraced, deluged by a burst dam in 1963 and pecked away by hundreds of creaking oil pumps for more than 70 years. High above the urban plain, the terrain now is a mix of eroded ravines, middle-class homes and working oil fields. But these weedy slopes could be in for a transformation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wave of anger over a proposed power plant in the Baldwin Hills continued to build Monday as nearly 1,000 outraged residents showed up at West Los Angeles College to fight the project. Speaker after speaker denounced the proposed plant, with many calling it an environmental justice issue in the predominantly African American community. "This is the heart of the African American community in Los Angeles," said Robert Garcia, an attorney with the Center for Law in the Public Interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state energy commissioner who presided over public hearings at which hundreds of people angrily opposed a proposed power plant in the Baldwin Hills said Wednesday night he will recommend that his panel reject the project. The 40-page statement issued by Commissioner Robert Pernell concludes that the power plant could not pass muster with air quality officials. The Energy Commission is scheduled to make a final decision on the plant in Sacramento on Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wave of anger over a proposed power plant in the Baldwin Hills continued to build Monday as nearly 1,000 outraged residents showed up at West Los Angeles College to fight the project. Speaker after speaker denounced the proposed plant, with many calling it an environmental justice issue in the predominantly African American community. "This is the heart of the African American community in Los Angeles," said Robert Garcia, an attorney with the Center for Law in the Public Interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a state running on fumes, the Baldwin Hills would seem the perfect spot for a new power plant. They provide rare open space in the urban plain. Homes sit a good half-mile away. And oil pumps have already degraded parts of the area for 70 years. So under the governor's emergency power orders, Stocker Resources applied this month to build a 53-megawatt power plant in the hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1993 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It all started at a homeowners meeting at the Village Green, an idyllic, 64-acre neighborhood built 50 years ago near Baldwin Hills as an experimental garden utopia. Should the 629 homeowners put up a fence to keep out crime? Resident Wesley van Kirk Robbins, an architect, listened as his neighbors debated the question. "A third were in favor of a fence, a third were against it and a third were on the fence," Robbins said. Robbins found himself waffling on the wall issue too.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though it comprises the largest concentration of affluent African-Americans in the West, the Baldwin Hills-Crenshaw area has struggled for decades to get the kinds of goods and services that are standard in white neighborhoods of similar wealth. But recently the community seemed to be turning a corner. Key businesses were opening. Investment was starting to flow. With new restaurants and music clubs, Crenshaw was gaining some regional recognition as a center for night life and culture.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
A proposed development of 12 single-family homes at Hillcrest and Don Ricardo drives is being opposed by neighbors who say the project is being planned without their input. "These developers, whoever they are, didn't do any legwork in the community," said Carlton Jenkins, president of Founders National Bank and a resident of Hillcrest Drive. "Nobody came to homeowner meetings. It looks like they're going to cut into the remnants of a hill, which doesn't seem feasible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 300 people, alarmed that an energy company wants to build a power plant in the Baldwin Hills, packed the City Council chambers in Culver City on Thursday evening and spilled out into a courtyard at a project hearing before a state energy commissioner. "We understand that there is an energy crisis," said Esther Feldman, president of Community Conservancy International, the main organization working to keep the plant out of the hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a state running on fumes, the Baldwin Hills would seem the perfect spot for a new power plant. They provide rare open space in the urban plain. Homes sit a good half-mile away. And oil pumps have already degraded parts of the area for 70 years. So under the governor's emergency power orders, Stocker Resources applied this month to build a 53-megawatt power plant in the hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite offering some of the best views in the Los Angeles Basin, the Baldwin Hills have had a tough time earning their due respect. They've been scalped and terraced, deluged by a burst dam in 1963 and pecked away by hundreds of creaking oil pumps for more than 70 years. High above the urban plain, the terrain now is a mix of eroded ravines, middle-class homes and working oil fields. But these weedy slopes could be in for a transformation.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | ERIN J. AUBRY
For well over a year the doors have stayed locked, the "Temporarily Closed" message on the dusty marquee growing more ominous as it became evident that the Baldwin Theater, the West's only black-owned first-run movie house, might never reopen. But now, thanks to the collective interest of Concerned Citizens of South-Central, the Baldwin seems poised for a renaissance.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
A proposed 12-lot development that was initially rejected by the city has won approval on appeal but now faces a final hearing requested by residents who say the project is unsafe. After being rejected in May by the Planning Commission's Advisory Agency, developer Shelley McMillan produced a revised grading report to win the commission's approval on appeal in October.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
With a little help from political and law enforcement officials, the leader of the Baldwin Village Apartment Owners Assn. says the village can clean up its sordid image next year. "We can make this a model community," said association president Ralph Isaacs. "With the involvement of the police and the city councilman, we'll be able to make a real difference."
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
An eight-screen movie theater complex originally scheduled to open this spring at Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza mall will be delayed and could be in jeopardy. The $5.7-million project was announced in September, with the city agreeing to contribute $2 million. The other $3.7 million was to come from mall developer the Alexander Haagen Co. and Inner City Cinemas, a joint venture between the American Multi-Cinema Inc. chain and the Lynwood-based Economic Resources Corp.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
A proposed 12-lot development that was initially rejected by the city has won approval on appeal but now faces a final hearing requested by residents who say the project is unsafe. After being rejected in May by the Planning Commission's Advisory Agency, developer Shelley McMillan produced a revised grading report to win the commission's approval on appeal in October.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | SCOTT SHIBUYA BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the aftermath of last year's riots, the joint venture formed last September to bring a movie theater complex to the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza was more than just a deal. It was a hopeful symbol of the city's commitment to rebuild and heal itself. If all went well, the struggling shopping center at the heart of the city's largest and wealthiest black community would finally have the traffic-generating theater its merchants were crying for.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1993 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It all started at a homeowners meeting at the Village Green, an idyllic, 64-acre neighborhood built 50 years ago near Baldwin Hills as an experimental garden utopia. Should the 629 homeowners put up a fence to keep out crime? Resident Wesley van Kirk Robbins, an architect, listened as his neighbors debated the question. "A third were in favor of a fence, a third were against it and a third were on the fence," Robbins said. Robbins found himself waffling on the wall issue too.
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