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Ballet Russe

ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
A Christmas tree grew in Glendale. Kind of. Even with the help of Sterlyn Steele of the Magic Castle as Drosselmeyer, the Media City Ballet production of "The Nutcracker" at the Alex Theatre on Sunday evening was a clunky, cluttered, way too kiddie-infested affair. This version was choreographed by Media City artistic director Natasha Middleton after one staged by her father, Andrei Tremaine (he danced with Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and is the company's coach).
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2004 | By Keith Thursby
George Zoritch, an international ballet star who had a second career as a well-respected teacher, died Nov. 1 at Carondelet St. Mary's Hospital in Tucson. He was 92. His death was confirmed by a spokeswoman for the law firm representing his estate. The cause was not given. Zoritch had retired in 1987 from teaching dance at the University of Arizona. He also taught at his studio in West Hollywood and had several stage and film credits. Zoritch was best known for his work with the Ballet Russe companies starting in the 1930s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2002 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meredith Baylis, a former dancer in the fabled Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo who went on to become a noted teacher in the Joffrey Ballet School and then taught for two decades in Southern California, has died. She was 73. Baylis died at St. Joseph's Hospital in Burbank on July 26 of complications from heart surgery. Of Scottish-Irish descent, Baylis was born in Burbank on April 4, 1929, and came from a theatrical family.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ballet Preljocaj, which danced a vivid reinterpretation of "Romeo and Juliet" last month in Los Angeles, comes to Irvine this week with an equally radical "Hommage aux Ballets Russes" program at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. The title refers to Serge Diaghilev's famous company, which launched a revolution in dance in Paris in the early decades of this century.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Ballet Theatre's new production of "Coppelia" has a legendary history. The dancers are learning the ballet from Frederic Franklin, once premier danseur and later ballet master of the famed Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. "I have been associated with this ballet since 1933, when [Kirov Ballet regisseur] Nicholas Sergeyev came out of Russia," Franklin, 82, said by phone during a break between recent company rehearsals in New York. "We staged the first and second acts, but not the third.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1989 | SUSAN REITER
Ballets generally live or die according to their place in the repertory. Let too many years slip by and suddenly, in spite of the best intentions, a ballet has become "lost," the province of history books and photo archives. That might have been the fate of George Balanchine's "Cotillon," one of the most conspicuously lamented "lost" ballets of the 20th Century. But thanks to a couple of amateur films, the remembrances of a few performers and two dedicated and experienced historians, the work has been reconstructed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1985
Harold Lang, a ballet and Broadway dancer who created the role of the First Sailor in Jerome Robbins' "Fancy Free" in 1944 and revived the title role in "Pal Joey" in Los Angeles in the early 1950s, has died. Lang was 64 and died July 26 at his home in Chico, Calif., after a short illness. A native of Daly City, Lang delivered telegrams as a youth and in 1940 took one backstage at a San Francisco theater where a ballet company was rehearsing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1985
Harold Lang, a ballet and Broadway dancer who created the role of the First Sailor in Jerome Robbins' "Fancy Free" in 1944 and revived the title role in "Pal Joey" in Los Angeles in the early 1950s, has died. Lang was believed to be 60 and died Friday at his home in Chico, Calif., after a short illness. A native of Daly City, Lang delivered telegrams as a youth and in 1940 took one backstage at a San Francisco theater where a ballet company was rehearsing.
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