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NEWS
October 10, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The Soviet Union officially set up diplomatic ties Wednesday with Lithuania and Estonia, two of the three Baltic republics that became independent after the failed August coup. Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin and his counterparts, Algirdas Saudargas of Lithuania and Lennart Meri of Estonia, signed the documents formally establishing relations. Pankin said diplomatic ties with Latvia will be established at a later date.
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WORLD
June 10, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
So what if international investors are fleeing the euro in droves, judging it too risky and unstable? Jurgen Ligi is running in the opposite direction: into the currency's arms, with his entire country in tow. On Jan. 1, Estonia is expected to bid goodbye to its beloved kroon and become the 17th country to adopt the euro after an arduous eligibility process. At a time when some economists are questioning the currency's very survival, the Estonian government insists that the euro remains a desirable commodity and that switching over would rebrand this Baltic nation.
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BUSINESS
September 3, 1991 | ALISTER BULL, REUTERS
Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia, recognized as independent nations by the United States on Monday, are seen as possible clients by Western bankers, but few expect a quick or easy transition from communism to capitalism. "There are business opportunities in the Baltics, but the journey will be long and hard," said Seppo Siljama, general manager at Kansallis-Osake-Pankki, a Finnish bank, in London.
OPINION
May 5, 2005 | Amity Gaige, Amity Gaige is the author of the novel "O My Darling," to be published by Other Press this month.
On Friday, President Bush will stop for a visit in the very small Baltic country of Latvia. The Latvians are dyspeptic over the visit. Much newsprint is going into speculation over why Bush is coming, what he will think. The Latvians -- an attractive, unsentimental people -- have the unfortunate distinction of having been free and sovereign for only 37 years of human history. This will be only their second visit by an American president. My mother was born in Latvia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1986 | JERRY COHEN, Times Staff Writer
When, at the age of 30, Leo Anderson was offered the unsalaried job as honorary consul in Los Angeles for the Republic of Latvia 53 years ago, he thought to himself: "Why not? I'll try anything once." Franklin Delano Roosevelt was beginning his first term. Latvia and her sister Baltic republics, Lithuania and Estonia, were enjoying independence after centuries of subjugation. World War II, which would erase the three little nations, was only an angry rumor.
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What would you expect from Europe's youngest prime minister--a man who recruits Cabinet members from among his fraternity brothers? Who used to ride from village to town on a bicycle, collecting stories of Stalinist oppression and thumbing his nose at the KGB? Who relaxes to the music of Guns 'N Roses? Radical reform.
NEWS
June 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia have made "good progress" toward qualifying for NATO membership, U.S. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said Saturday. In a meeting with his counterparts from the Nordic and Baltic nations, Rumsfeld said the United States favors adding members to the alliance when they are ready. At a news conference afterward, Rumsfeld did not define "ready" or say whether the Baltic countries would be invited to join.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1991
One of the reasons given for American unwillingness to recognize Slovenia and Croatia as independent and sovereign states is the belief that such recognition would encourage the various nations in the Soviet Union to seek independence, and that it would undermine the power and authority of President Gorbachev. Events in the Soviet Union have resulted in monumental changes. The era of Gorbachev is over. Boris Yeltsin is the new and powerful leader not only of the Russian Federation but also of the Soviet Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1987
Baltic-Americans were delighted to read the informative and well-written editorial "Testing Glasnost" (Aug. 26). These Baltic demonstrators are merely the latest in a series of challenges to the logic of glasnost and they have much in common with earlier demonstrators seeking independence. The Soviet Union has frequently acquired its fringe republics and its national minorities by force of arms and then governs them against their will. Fortunately, the Baltic Nations, unlike many other national minorities, have a cause for independence in international law. However, in present circumstances having a good case counts for little in the face of overwhelming Soviet power.
OPINION
November 13, 1988
I would like to commend Times staff writer Norman Kempster for his article "Annexed Baltic States: Envoys Hold On to Lonely U.S. Postings" (Part I, Oct. 31). The informative and realistic description about today's Baltic states diplomats residing in Washington and New York shed more light about past and present situations of Baltic states. The Baltic diplomats are thrilled by the news from home. But they still fear a Communist trick. Maybe Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev chose the Baltic states for glasnost because Russians won't speak out except to say they want more food on the table.
WORLD
September 13, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Each day for 12 years, the rhythm of life in this village of scrap-metal lean-tos, plywood shacks and misery in North Ossetia has been the same. Those who have jobs in the nearest city hike up to the main road and flag down a passing car or, with luck, catch a bus. Later in the morning, the children set out for school, walking a mile and a half along roads that are often muddy or buried in snow. At 5 p.m. sharp, the water tap in the center of town opens up for precisely three hours.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A military plane growls slowly across the evening sky. In its wake, six white parachutes bloom one by one against lilac-tinted clouds. Half a dozen observation boats bob on the lake below. The man in charge of preparing Latvia for NATO candidacy watches his special forces troops descend alongside U.S. training comrades. "We are on the right track," says Col. Raimonds Graube. "Our development is right. Our procedures are right."
NEWS
June 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia have made "good progress" toward qualifying for NATO membership, U.S. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said Saturday. In a meeting with his counterparts from the Nordic and Baltic nations, Rumsfeld said the United States favors adding members to the alliance when they are ready. At a news conference afterward, Rumsfeld did not define "ready" or say whether the Baltic countries would be invited to join.
NEWS
May 29, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't look now, but NATO is invading. For the first time, NATO's Parliamentary Assembly has met on the territory of the former Soviet Union--in Vilnius, Lithuania--and the chief question before it is how the alliance should expand. It is a topic and setting that has ruffled feathers in Moscow, which remains adamant that there is no reason for the Atlantic alliance to keep getting bigger--and especially no reason that the former Soviet republics of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia should join.
NEWS
February 19, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many people would be hard pressed to find this country on a map. Like its Baltic neighbors, Latvia and Estonia, Lithuania pretty much dropped out of the news after its population and Parliament defied the Soviet army's tanks in 1991 and achieved independence.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia on Thursday sharply denied reports from Washington that its military forces have in recent years quietly transferred tactical nuclear weapons back into Moscow's westernmost outpost, on the Baltic Sea. "Dishonest sources of information" and "various secret intelligence services" are behind the reports that Moscow has moved short-range weapons to the enclave of Kaliningrad, said Capt. Anatoly Lobsky, head of the press center of the Russian Baltic Fleet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1990 | REIN TAAGEPERA, Rein Taagepera, a professor of social science at UC Irvine, was elected to the Estonian Congress, a non-Soviet quasi-parliament, from his native town in Estonia.
And the government in London sent word to George Washington: "Of course you can secede from the British Empire. But it must be done in an orderly and lawful manner, and we are the ones who make the law. "Your committees and your Congress count for nothing. They do not speak for most of your people, and if they do, then your people are just too emotional. There must be a referendum, and we will run it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1987
The Justice Department, as a result of "research" by its Office of Special Investigations, barred Kurt Waldheim from entering the United States because he "assisted or otherwise participated in the persecution of persons because of race, religion, national origin or political opinion." One assumes it will also place General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev on its undesirable "watch list" for the same reasons. As leader of the Soviet Union, he "assists" in the persecution of people for their religion, i.e., Lithuanian and Ukrainian Catholics, Baptists, Pentecostals, Jews, and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2000 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
In the 1980s and into the 1990s, a distinctly mystical music emanating from Eastern Europe began pervading the West. Geography didn't seem to matter. Whether it was Russians Alfred Schnittke and Sophia Gubaidulina, Estonian Arvo Part, Pole Henryk Gorecki or Georgian Giya Kancheli, they all seemed to share the same spirit of spiritual minimalism.
NEWS
January 4, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than two years, Juozas Grabauskas has lived quietly in a 10th-floor, Soviet-style apartment here. His neighbors say he told them that he once lived in America. He never mentioned, however, that his U.S. citizenship was revoked because he lied about his Nazi past. Grabauskas kept quiet about a U.S. judge's finding that he was an officer with an infamous Lithuanian battalion that killed more than 10,000 Jews during World War II.
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