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SPORTS
January 27, 2005 | From Associated Press
Running back Jamal Lewis of the Baltimore Ravens was sentenced Wednesday to four months in prison for using a cellphone to try to set up a cocaine deal about 4 1/2 years ago. The penalty, worked out with prosecutors in October, should allow Lewis to return to the Ravens well before the start of the 2005 season. He also will spend two months in a halfway house and perform 500 hours of community service after his prison term.
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SPORTS
November 24, 2003 | MIKE PENNER
So this is where de-evolution had taken the city of Baltimore and its once peerless quarterbacking position -- from Johnny Unitas to Bert Jones to (after a lengthy intermission) Vinny Testaverde to Tony Banks to Trent Dilfer to Elvis Grbac to Kyle Boller to, alas, on this sad Sunday in late 2003, yes, sorry to say, Anthony Wright. One minute before halftime, Wright had managed to help the Ravens put nothing more than a field goal on the scoreboard. What could the Ravens expect?
SPORTS
October 7, 2002 | From Associated Press
Ray Lewis couldn't do anything but watch--and wince--as the Cleveland Browns rallied. For the second time in six days, Lewis made a national TV game his own prime-time special as the Baltimore Ravens built a big lead and held on for a 26-21 victory Sunday night. But when his teammates needed their star linebacker the most, Lewis couldn't help them. He hurt his left shoulder late in the third quarter and did not return. "I was cheering on the sideline," Lewis said.
SPORTS
November 14, 2001 | Associated Press
The Tennessee Titans celebrated what they believed was a last-second victory against the defending Super Bowl champions. Instead, the Titans were done in by a do-over. In one of the wackiest NFL finishes of the year, the Titans trailed, 16-10, as they drove down the field in the closing seconds against the Baltimore Ravens on Monday night.
SPORTS
July 6, 2001 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trent Dilfer never expected to make history this way. But here he is, a man without a team, the guy who went from Disney World to no-man's land in a matter of weeks. Dilfer is the only starting quarterback in NFL history who was released after leading his team, the Baltimore Ravens, to victory in the Super Bowl. John Elway didn't play after his Denver Broncos won it in 1999 but that was his choice. He retired.
SPORTS
March 2, 2001 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the NFL free-agent signing period beginning today, the Washington Redskins' 2000 blueprint is not in demand. The Redskins designed what amounted to a lavish home with every amenity but a lock for the front door: They signed high-profile stars but no quality kicker, lost too many close games and went from preseason Super Bowl favorites to watching the playoffs on TV.
SPORTS
January 30, 2001 | Associated Press
One day after the Giants' meltdown, quarterback Kerry Collins disclosed he separated his right shoulder during the third quarter. "I wasn't coming out, though," Collins said Monday. Collins said Sam Adams, one of the Ravens' 300-pound plus defensive linemen, fell on him with his "full weight," causing the injury. After the game, teammate Michael Strahan walked up to Collins and gave him a hug. It was a thank you from the defensive end for getting the team to the Super Bowl.
SPORTS
January 30, 2001 | ROBYN NORWOOD and GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ray Lewis was chosen most valuable player of Super Bowl XXXV, but quarterback Trent Dilfer was on parade at Walt Disney World on Monday. On the day after the Baltimore Ravens' 34-7 victory over the New York Giants, the usual endorsement bonanza for a Super Bowl MVP was not materializing. Companies were predictably steering clear of the controversial Lewis, who pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice for hindering the investigation of a double murder after last year's Super Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Super Bowl that lived down to expectations still scored a key goal for CBS by providing a springboard to launch "Survivor: The Australian Outback," which attracted an estimated 43.6 million viewers--the biggest audience for a program following the Super Bowl since a special episode of "Friends" in 1996. Viewership of the Baltimore Ravens' drubbing of the New York Giants declined by about 5% compared to a year ago--when St. Louis beat Tennessee on a down-to-the-last-play thriller--with 84.
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