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Bands England

ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
There's a reason the rock band Jesus and Mary Chain finished first or second in four key categories--including best group and album--but failed to make the Top 10 in the best live-act category in the latest New Musical Express readers' poll in England.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1991 | RICHARD CROMELIN
It was no surprise to see Ride's Andrew Bell wielding a Rickenbacker 12-string guitar at the Roxy on Wednesday. The instrument is indelibly linked to the folk-rock sound of the Byrds, whose density and harmonies form one pillar of the young English group's sound. Ride's L.A. debut came as part of its U.S. tour with Lush--two baby bands from England cutting their teeth on the road, flipping a coin each night to see who plays first.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2012 | Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Members of the category-defying band NRBQ knew from the outset that their prospects of mainstream success were slim to none. With a sound and attitude that embraced the seminal rock of Chuck Berry and no-borders expanse of free-form jazz experimentalist Sun Ra, the invigorating dance rhythms of zydeco kingpin Boozoo Chavis and dreamy multilayered pop of Brian Wilson, the quartet spent the '70s, '80s and '90s recording and touring chiefly for the...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1994 | LORRAINE ALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Inside Cal State Dominguez Hills on Sunday, fans pogoed happily in front of Lollapalooza '94's second stage, cheering to the pop songs of Japan's Shonen Knife, while yards away at the main stage, giant mosh pits surged to the aggressive chants of L7. In between the two stages, carnival rides spun, poets pontificated, interactive computers interacted and dozens of booths filled with political paraphernalia, food and retail booths bustled. It was virtually an eclectic rock and rap carnival.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1991 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was no surprise to see Ride's Andrew Bell wielding a Rickenbacker 12-string guitar at the Roxy on Wednesday. The instrument is indelibly linked to the folk-rock sound of the Byrds, whose density and harmonies form one pillar of this young English group's sound. Ride's L.A. debut came as part of its U.S. tour with Lush--two baby bands from England cutting their teeth on the road, flipping a coin each night to see who plays first.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1987 | STACY FINZ, Times Staff Writer
During 12 years together, the Stranglers have seen their music undergo some radical changes. And now the British band is just beginning to garner success in the United States. At one time, the band's records were banned in England for obscenity. They were described in early days by British journalist Ira Robbins as having "violently emotional lyrics and bitterly spat vocals." However, the political and social commentary has become more subtle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Singer Joey Ramone, the reed-thin punk rock icon who as a member of the Ramones influenced rockers from the Sex Pistols to the Offspring, died Sunday. He was 49. Ramone, the lead singer with the Afghan hair, pallid skin, leather jacket, tinted glasses and crooked smile, died of lymphoma. The four-member Ramones came out of Queens with limited musical skills, but by 1976, their staccato riffs and full-frontal garage rock assaults began to make their mark on British punk musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Mixing punk rock with mariachi music might sound like a quixotic mission. Unless, that is, you've ever stumbled upon a troupe of Guadalajara horn players closing down a bar after one too many tequilas. Or you've heard Mariachi El Bronx. Mariachi El Bronx, which is opening for the Foo Fighters on Thursday at the Forum, is the charro-suited alter ego of the Bronx, one of L.A.'s most formidable hard-core punk bands. Smashing into existence in 2002, the Bronx became known for its raw lyrics and apocalyptic instrumentals on such snarling anthems as "White Guilt" (about a coke-addled prostitute)
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Wildcat Lounge in Santa Barbara was as raucous as Don Knotts whistling in the back yard. It's the place around the corner from Alex's Cantina where seldom was heard a witless "wahoo" for any pro football team, because on TV in the bar it was none other than "The Fall of the Roman Empire" on the American Movie Channel.
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