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Bangladesh Elections

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NEWS
February 16, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This politically gridlocked country held an election Thursday, and there were killings, acts of intimidation by the opposition, reports of government ballot-box stuffing and soldiers and police deployed by the hundreds of thousands to keep the peace. Only two things were missing as one of Asia's most impoverished countries selected a new Parliament: a real choice for the electorate, and voters themselves.
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WORLD
January 12, 2007 | Nurul Alam and Laura King, Special to The Times
After weeks of mounting political violence, Bangladesh's president declared a nationwide state of emergency Thursday and indefinitely postponed elections that had been scheduled to take place in less than two weeks. President Iajuddin Ahmed also said he would step down as interim head of a caretaker administration in the impoverished South Asian nation but would retain the largely ceremonial post of president. No new date was set for nationwide balloting that had been scheduled for Jan. 22.
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NEWS
June 13, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The opposition Awami League, led by Hasina Wajed, maintained a steady lead over former Prime Minister Khaleda Zia's Bangladesh Nationalist Party with more than half the votes counted from the general election, which saw a huge turnout. Seven people were killed and more than 200 hurt in election violence, but Western and Asian monitors said the voting was orderly in most places.
NEWS
September 30, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Two days before a national election, Bangladesh's government deployed more than 50,000 soldiers and police nationwide to control escalating political violence. Police said seven more people were killed. The fatalities came as Bangladeshi troops took up positions outside 30,000 polling stations throughout the country ahead of Monday's vote. Authorities say clashes between supporters of rival parties have left 134 people dead since campaigning started in July.
NEWS
February 12, 1988
Continued political violence left 100 more rioters wounded in Bangladesh, a day after election clashes took at least 80 lives. Police said street battles between supporters of rival candidates in local elections raged in three towns near the capital of Dhaka, with crowds exchanging gunfire and volleys of rocks and homemade bombs. Opposition groups blamed the violence on activists backing President Hussain Mohammed Ershad.
NEWS
June 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Sheik Hasina Wajed said she will step down next month to pave the way for general elections in Bangladesh. The 330-seat Parliament is expected to be dissolved July 12 on completion of its five-year term, Wajed told writers, artists and academics at a gathering in the capital, Dhaka, on Friday. A neutral caretaker administration will take over from Wajed and hold elections within three months, as called for in the constitution.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The opposition Awami League, led by Hasina Wajed, maintained a steady lead over former Prime Minister Khaleda Zia's Bangladesh Nationalist Party with more than half the votes counted from the general election, which saw a huge turnout. Seven people were killed and more than 200 hurt in election violence, but Western and Asian monitors said the voting was orderly in most places.
NEWS
February 16, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This politically gridlocked country held an election Thursday, and there were killings, acts of intimidation by the opposition, reports of government ballot-box stuffing and soldiers and police deployed by the hundreds of thousands to keep the peace. Only two things were missing as one of Asia's most impoverished countries selected a new Parliament: a real choice for the electorate, and voters themselves.
NEWS
January 31, 1994 | From Associated Press
Explosives and gunfire erupted at polling centers in Dhaka during local elections Sunday, killing at least two people and wounding 200. Voters cast ballots for mayors and city council members in Dhaka, Chittagong, Rajshahi and Khulna, the four largest cities in Bangladesh. Most of the wounded were shot, doctors at hospitals said. Election officials were among the wounded.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Deposed President Hussain Mohammed Ershad's Jatiya Party will contest the Feb. 27 parliamentary elections, party officials said in Dhaka. Ershad, who has been under house arrest for the last three weeks, resigned Dec. 6, bowing to public pressure against what opposition parties said was his autocratic and corrupt government. It was not immediately known if Ershad himself would be allowed to contest next month's elections.
NEWS
January 29, 1989
Bangladesh officials suspended municipal voting at scores of polling places around the country after an outbreak in political violence left six people dead and about 200 injured, authorities said. About 15,000 police and village guards had been deployed to protect polling stations during the voting for 80 municipal councils after earlier campaign violence. But balloting was halted after repeated clashes involving groups of rival candidates, supporters and police.
NEWS
November 11, 1988
About 20,000 protesters rallied in the streets of Dhaka, capital of Bangladesh, and demanded that President Hussain Mohammed Ershad resign to pave the way for parliamentary elections. The demonstrators, shouting anti-government slogans, gathered in five separate rallies to mark the anniversary of a violent campaign launched Nov. 10, 1987 to topple the president.
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