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Bani Walid

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September 16, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Fighting continued in Moammar Kadafi's hometown of Sirte on Friday, with 13 anti-Kadafi troops reported killed and at least 25 wounded. A government spokesman said anti-Kadafi forces were advancing inside the city on several fronts but were meeting heavy resistance. Meanwhile, forces loyal to the provisional government were streaming toward another pro-Kadafi bastion, Bani Walid, 95 miles southeast of Tripoli, the capital. Heavy fighting was reported inside the city, which has been under siege for a week.
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WORLD
July 10, 2012 | By Glen Johnson, Los Angeles Times
TRIPOLI, Libya — The main street in Misurata remains shot to pieces. In Tripoli's Janzour suburb, displacement camps dot the landscape. Yet Libya, site of the Arab world's most violent revolution last year, staged largely peaceful national elections over the weekend, with victory appearing likely for a coalition appealing to a wide range of ideological views that is led by one of the main figures in the war that ousted longtime strongman Moammar...
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WORLD
September 4, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Rebel forces were closing in Sunday on a strategic town still loyal to longtime Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi amid reports that negotiations for the town's surrender had broken down. Abdullah Kanshil, a rebel negotiator, told reporters Sunday that talks meant to craft a nonviolent surrender of the desert town of Bani Walid had failed. He said the next step was in the hands of field commanders. The focus in the six-month civil war has shifted to Bani Walid, a Kadafi stronghold about 90 miles southeast of Tripoli, the capital.
WORLD
July 7, 2012 | By Glen Johnson, Los Angeles Times
TRIPOLI, Libya - Libyans vote for a national assembly Saturday amid sharpening ethnic and tribal tension threatening the nation's transition from Moammar Kadafi's repressive rule to the newest democracy to emerge from the Arab Spring. This North African country, rich in oil and scarred by Kadafi's legacy, is at once a cause for hope and a dangerous tinderbox. Heavily armed militias hold sway in many towns. Talk of secession echoes through the east. Islamists are angling for a political voice and tribal leaders from the Sahara desert to the Mediterranean coast have only a cursory notion of how to build a civil state.
WORLD
September 17, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Forces loyal to ousted Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi put up fierce resistance Friday on two fronts, fending off revolutionary fighters trying to take a pair of holdout cities that have defied the nation's new transitional government. Anti-Kadafi fighters launched major attacks on Surt, the coastal town where Kadafi was born, and Bani Walid, a desert city that benefited from the longtime leader's financial largesse. But in both cases the attackers' predictions of quick and decisive victories proved wrong.
WORLD
September 9, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Rebels advanced Friday into Bani Walid, one of the final strongholds in Libya of fallen strongman Moammar Kadafi's rule, according to reports from the area. Fighters who had been preparing an assault for weeks moved into the pro-Kadafi bastion about 90 miles southeast of Tripoli from the north and east, said Abdullah Kanshil, a representative of Libya's transitional ruling council, who spoke to journalists outside the town. The invading fighters met sniper fire, Kanshil said, and street fighting was reported.
WORLD
March 23, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
The gift for his family's loyalty, service and sacrifice was an AK-47 assault rifle. Seventeen-year-old Abubakr Issa brandished the weapon with pride in the courtyard of his family's home in Bani Walid, a small tribal town about 100 miles southeast of Tripoli, the capital. Three days earlier his 37-year-old brother Fatih, a career infantryman in the Libyan armed forces, had died during an airstrike near Benghazi. "I was happy to learn my brother died because he is now a martyr," the young man said Wednesday as a multinational coalition's aircraft and missiles pounded Libyan military targets for a fifth day. "I also want to go to the front.
WORLD
September 25, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Forces of Libya's provisional government launched a renewed assault Saturday on Moammar Kadafi's hometown, meeting fierce sniper, mortar and rocket fire from the bastion of support for the ousted leader. Attackers reached a key intersection near the center of the coastal city of Surt by sunset, but were slowed by resistance from pro-Kadafi forces, reported the pan-Arab satellite network Al Jazeera. Television video showed tanks firing and explosions going off in the city as fighters crouched behind vehicles and buildings for cover along the streets of Surt, which has been under siege for more than a week.
WORLD
September 18, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Heavy fighting was reported Saturday in the battle for Moammar Kadafi's hometown, while a military spokesman for Libya's new government conceded that it has no idea where the former leader is hiding. Fighters allied with the new government pushed farther into Surt, along Libya's central Mediterranean coast, but again met stiff resistance from well-armed loyalists ensconced in the pro-Kadafi bastion. The military command in nearby Misurata said that at least 24 of its fighters had been killed in Surt and at least 54 wounded, with many injured by loyalist mortar rounds or Grad missiles.
WORLD
September 2, 2011 | By Devorah Lauter and Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
World leaders and delegations from more than 60 nations gathered Thursday in Paris to build international support for Libya's transition to democracy after the fall of Moammar Kadafi. French President Nicolas Sarkozy, who hosted the event at the Elysee Palace, praised the progress made by the gathering, which included Germany, Algeria, Russia and China, countries that did not support North Atlantic Treaty Organization airstrikes that proved crucial to the anti-Kadafi insurgency Russia recognized the legitimacy of the Libyan rebel leadership earlier in the day. Photos: The Libyan conflict "We want this to be the beginning of a policy that puts military force at the service of protecting populations who risk being martyred" by their own leaders, Sarkozy said.
WORLD
October 29, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
A group of mercenaries has offered to help Moammar Kadafi's fugitive son and onetime heir apparent evade arrest and trial, an international prosecutor said Friday. The International Criminal Court warned that authorities might intercept any aircraft linked to the suspected plot to shield Seif Islam Kadafi from facing war crimes charges pending against him. ICC prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo also said his office had had "informal contact" with the younger Kadafi, once regarded as the reformist face of his father's regime in Libya.
WORLD
October 21, 2011 | By Henry Chu and David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
With the capture and death of Moammar Kadafi, NATO's aerial assault on Libya essentially ended the same way it began: with warplanes raining down bombs on him in the name of a U.N. mandate to protect civilians from his loyalists, while helping Kadafi's enemies run him to ground. Throughout the seven-month operation, the alliance in essence served as the anti-Kadafi fighters' air force, crippling the strongman's forces and installations with relentless sorties that at times came close to killing him as well.
WORLD
September 25, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Forces of Libya's provisional government launched a renewed assault Saturday on Moammar Kadafi's hometown, meeting fierce sniper, mortar and rocket fire from the bastion of support for the ousted leader. Attackers reached a key intersection near the center of the coastal city of Surt by sunset, but were slowed by resistance from pro-Kadafi forces, reported the pan-Arab satellite network Al Jazeera. Television video showed tanks firing and explosions going off in the city as fighters crouched behind vehicles and buildings for cover along the streets of Surt, which has been under siege for more than a week.
WORLD
September 23, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Fugitive leader Moammar Kadafi remains a danger and Libya faces "stubborn resistance" from former regime loyalists, but the U.S. ambassador to Libya said Thursday that he did not envision a long-term insurgency against the nation's fledgling government. "I don't think the Libyan people, after all the blood that has been shed in the last six months, are going to let their revolution be hijacked," Ambassador Gene Cretz said after a flag-raising ceremony at the ambassador's residence, now the site of the U.S. Embassy.
WORLD
September 21, 2011 | By Henry Chu and Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization authorized a 90-day extension of the alliance's aerial mission over Libya on Wednesday, raising the prospect that U.S. and allied troops could be involved in the North African nation until Christmas. But NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen emphasized that the alliance could call home its forces "at any time" if international authorities and the new Libyan government determine that NATO's help is no longer necessary. "This decision sends a clear message to the Libyan people: We will be there for as long as necessary but not a day longer, while you take your future in your hands to ensure a safe transition to the new Libya," Rasmussen said.
WORLD
September 19, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Libya's provisional rulers on Sunday put off "indefinitely" their much-anticipated naming of a new government tasked with guiding the nation forward after the ouster of longtime leader Moammar Kadafi. Meanwhile, new clashes were reported in two remaining pro-Kadafi strongholds, the coastal city of Surt, Kadafi's birthplace, and the desert town of Bani Walid, southeast of Tripoli. Mahmoud Jibril, the No. 2 leader in Libya's Transitional National Council, told reporters in the eastern city of Benghazi that the filling of Cabinet positions and other posts had been delayed pending final discussions among various groups.
WORLD
September 13, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Gunmen loyal to Moammar Kadafi pulled off a daring attack Monday at a major oil refinery inside what was supposedly rebel-held territory in eastern Libya, killing 17 guards. The strike at the facility near Ras Lanuf, on the Mediterranean coast, underscored warnings from Libya's transitional rulers that the nation remains insecure as long as Kadafi is free and publicly urging his followers to carry out a guerrilla war. "We can't be complacent: We must always be vigilant," said Jalal Gallal, a spokesman for the rebel-led transitional administration, whose forces recently drove Libya's longtime ruler from the capital, Tripoli.
WORLD
September 21, 2011 | By Henry Chu and Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization authorized a 90-day extension of the alliance's aerial mission over Libya on Wednesday, raising the prospect that U.S. and allied troops could be involved in the North African nation until Christmas. But NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen emphasized that the alliance could call home its forces "at any time" if international authorities and the new Libyan government determine that NATO's help is no longer necessary. "This decision sends a clear message to the Libyan people: We will be there for as long as necessary but not a day longer, while you take your future in your hands to ensure a safe transition to the new Libya," Rasmussen said.
WORLD
September 18, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Heavy fighting was reported Saturday in the battle for Moammar Kadafi's hometown, while a military spokesman for Libya's new government conceded that it has no idea where the former leader is hiding. Fighters allied with the new government pushed farther into Surt, along Libya's central Mediterranean coast, but again met stiff resistance from well-armed loyalists ensconced in the pro-Kadafi bastion. The military command in nearby Misurata said that at least 24 of its fighters had been killed in Surt and at least 54 wounded, with many injured by loyalist mortar rounds or Grad missiles.
WORLD
September 17, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Forces loyal to ousted Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi put up fierce resistance Friday on two fronts, fending off revolutionary fighters trying to take a pair of holdout cities that have defied the nation's new transitional government. Anti-Kadafi fighters launched major attacks on Surt, the coastal town where Kadafi was born, and Bani Walid, a desert city that benefited from the longtime leader's financial largesse. But in both cases the attackers' predictions of quick and decisive victories proved wrong.
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