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August 19, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Louis G. Laughlin's 21-year banking career came to an abrupt end one Friday afternoon in 1985. "My whole division was lined up and shot," said Laughlin, who was earning $70,000 a year as deputy administrator of government relations at Security Pacific Bank at the time he was laid off. "Anybody who wasn't bringing in revenue was vulnerable." Laughlin searched in vain for three years for a comparable job in Southern California.
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BUSINESS
August 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Study Predicts 50% Reduction in Branches: As many as 450,000 bank jobs will disappear in the next five years and half of all branches will be gone over the next 10 years as customers turn to electronic transactions, the accounting firm Deloitte & Touche said. About 30%, or 840,000, of the 2.8 million U.S. bank employees work in branches, the firm estimated.
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BUSINESS
August 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Study Predicts 50% Reduction in Branches: As many as 450,000 bank jobs will disappear in the next five years and half of all branches will be gone over the next 10 years as customers turn to electronic transactions, the accounting firm Deloitte & Touche said. About 30%, or 840,000, of the 2.8 million U.S. bank employees work in branches, the firm estimated.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES and MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bank of America, looking to cut costs after last year's merger with Security Pacific Corp., has begun slashing the hours and eliminating the benefits of some full-time tellers. The action reflects a trend among big employers away from full-time employment, as companies crunched by the recession and heightened competition seek to save money at every turn.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES and MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bank of America, looking to cut costs after last year's merger with Security Pacific Corp., has begun slashing the hours and eliminating the benefits of some full-time tellers. The action reflects a trend among big employers away from full-time employment, as companies crunched by the recession and heightened competition seek to save money at every turn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1989
A new study of foreign investments in the United States is reassuring at a time when both Congress and some state legislatures are considering establishment of new barriers to discourage the flow of foreign money into the United States. The study lends support to President Bush's welcome commitment to resist the barriers and encourage a free flow of investments in the world.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1997 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Providing more luster to California's bright economic picture, revised figures released Friday show employers in the state added a whopping 379,300 jobs last year, 57,000 more than previously estimated. Although Los Angeles County continued to lag, the state's employment growth last year was the most since 1988.
NEWS
May 13, 2000 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California posted its biggest jobs gain in more than two years last month, pushing unemployment back down to 4.8% and reducing joblessness in the Latino work force to another record low. State officials reported Friday that California added 64,400 jobs in April. It was the latest demonstration of how the labor market here is catching up with tight-labor conditions in the rest of the country.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1998 | LIZ PULLIAM and PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Washington Mutual Inc., the nation's largest savings and loan, said it will close 161 branches in California next year, including 21 in Orange County, to combine outlets too close to one another after its purchase of Home Savings of America. The closures and other consolidations are expected to cost up to 3,500 bank employees their jobs and displace thousands of customers, although many are being moved to branches a few blocks away.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Louis G. Laughlin's 21-year banking career came to an abrupt end one Friday afternoon in 1985. "My whole division was lined up and shot," said Laughlin, who was earning $70,000 a year as deputy administrator of government relations at Security Pacific Bank at the time he was laid off. "Anybody who wasn't bringing in revenue was vulnerable." Laughlin searched in vain for three years for a comparable job in Southern California.
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