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NEWS
January 7, 1988
Gen. Bantu Holomisa, youthful leader of an army coup in the South African tribal homeland of Transkei, appointed himself military and government chief. The announcement in Umtata, the Transkei capital, came amid mounting South African concern over the huge cost of maintaining the turbulent homelands, a key element in Pretoria's policy of separating the races. In a surprise move, Holomisa reappointed eight ministers from the ousted regime of Stella Sigcau, which he has denounced as corrupt.
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NEWS
January 7, 1988
Gen. Bantu Holomisa, youthful leader of an army coup in the South African tribal homeland of Transkei, appointed himself military and government chief. The announcement in Umtata, the Transkei capital, came amid mounting South African concern over the huge cost of maintaining the turbulent homelands, a key element in Pretoria's policy of separating the races. In a surprise move, Holomisa reappointed eight ministers from the ousted regime of Stella Sigcau, which he has denounced as corrupt.
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NEWS
December 30, 1987 | Associated Press
The army in the black homeland of Transkei staged a coup today, ousting the recently elected prime minister and accusing her of corruption. Maj. Gen. Bantu Holomisa, the army commander, announced the coup in a broadcast on Radio Transkei. He declared martial law, suspended the constitution and outlawed political activity. Holomisa told the South African Broadcasting Corp. that there were no arrests during the takeover and that the ousted prime minister, Stella Sigcau, is "on leave."
NEWS
December 30, 1987 | Associated Press
The army in the black homeland of Transkei staged a coup today, ousting the recently elected prime minister and accusing her of corruption. Maj. Gen. Bantu Holomisa, the army commander, announced the coup in a broadcast on Radio Transkei. He declared martial law, suspended the constitution and outlawed political activity. Holomisa told the South African Broadcasting Corp. that there were no arrests during the takeover and that the ousted prime minister, Stella Sigcau, is "on leave."
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
About 50,000 people gathered in South Africa's black homeland of Transkei to hear speeches by Walter Sisulu and other veteran leaders of the African National Congress. The leaders praised reforms adopted by Gen. Bantu Holomisa, leader of the nominally independent homeland, one of four set up by the white government of South Africa. Holomisa recently lifted the state of emergency, freed political prisoners and ended bans on 15 anti-apartheid groups.
NEWS
January 25, 1999 | From Associated Press
Police fired tear gas Sunday to prevent street clashes, and officials from the nation's ruling party came under gunfire after the killing of an opposition leader and the massacre of 11 people. Sifiso Nkabinde, 38, a controversial leader of the small United Democratic Movement party, was fatally shot Saturday as he sat in his car in Richmond, a town 300 miles southeast of Johannesburg.
NEWS
December 31, 1987 | Associated Press
The military in the nominally independent South African black homeland of Transkei staged a bloodless coup Wednesday, ousting Prime Minister Stella Sigcau after less than three months in office. Maj. Gen. Bantu Holomisa, the 32-year-old army commander, announced on Radio Transkei that he has taken power as head of a military council. He accused Sigcau of corruption and said she is now "on leave."
NEWS
May 12, 1994 | From Associated Press
Nelson Mandela included his chief black rival in the Cabinet of South Africa's first post-apartheid government on Wednesday and gave his estranged wife a deputy minister post. Zulu nationalist leader Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi became home affairs minister, and Winnie Mandela was named deputy minister of arts, culture, science and technology. The 27-member Cabinet, which includes 18 representatives from Mandela's African National Congress, six from former president Frederik W.
NEWS
August 21, 1990 | From Reuters
South Africa's white government and two black homeland leaders jointly pleaded for peace today after feuding black factions killed nearly 400 people and wounded over 1,500 in weeklong battles. Conservative Zulu chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi met President Frederik W. de Klerk and later urged his followers to lay down their arms and end the ferocious conflict between his supporters and rivals from Nelson Mandela's African National Congress.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | From Reuters
South Africa's white government and two black homeland leaders jointly pleaded for peace Tuesday after feuding black factions killed nearly 400 people and wounded more than 1,500 in weeklong battles. Conservative Zulu chief Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi met President Frederick W. de Klerk and later urged his followers to lay down their arms in a ferocious conflict between his supporters and rivals from Nelson Mandela's African National Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The military ruler of a South African "homeland" that is not recognized by the U.S. government visited Orange County this week, trying to gain support for his regime and negotiating to allow construction of a Christian television station in his capital. Maj. Gen. Bantu Holomisa, who seized power in the Transkei in a bloodless coup more than a year ago, and seven members of his government appeared Wednesday with Paul F.
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