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Barbara Buchan

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May 4, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The California state Supreme Court in San Francisco, agreeing with an appeals court decision, refused to restore $1.1 million in damages to a cyclist Barbara Buchan, who was severly injured during a July, 1982 race from Malibu to Westlake Village. Buchan suffered brain damage and nearly died from her injuries, but now is able to walk and talk, and competes in track events for the handicapped in Oregon. In a suit filed against the sponsoring U.S.
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May 4, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The California state Supreme Court in San Francisco, agreeing with an appeals court decision, refused to restore $1.1 million in damages to a cyclist Barbara Buchan, who was severly injured during a July, 1982 race from Malibu to Westlake Village. Buchan suffered brain damage and nearly died from her injuries, but now is able to walk and talk, and competes in track events for the handicapped in Oregon. In a suit filed against the sponsoring U.S.
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August 5, 1989
What does The Times have against bike racing? There has been minor coverage of a few local events, some wire-service stories on international races and attention paid to Greg LeMond's Tour de France victory. But during this period The Times has carried three in-depth cycling-related stories: on Barbara Buchan's lawsuit against the U.S. Cycling Federation; on Cindy Olavarri's problems with steroids, and Randy Harvey's follow-up piece on Greg LeMond--featuring the rumor that his last pro team sponsor wanted him to take a banned drug.
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August 5, 1989
What does The Times have against bike racing? There has been minor coverage of a few local events, some wire-service stories on international races and attention paid to Greg LeMond's Tour de France victory. But during this period The Times has carried three in-depth cycling-related stories: on Barbara Buchan's lawsuit against the U.S. Cycling Federation; on Cindy Olavarri's problems with steroids, and Randy Harvey's follow-up piece on Greg LeMond--featuring the rumor that his last pro team sponsor wanted him to take a banned drug.
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April 1, 1989
As I read Shav Glick's (March 25) article on Barbara Buchan and was cheered by the story of one woman's triumph over adversity, I found myself suddenly jolted by a few paragraphs at the end of the article. It's not pleasant to write hard words about someone who has had their fill of hardship. But having read Buchan's comments on her suit against the U.S. Cycling Federation, I have to say something. I also suffered a head injury in a sanctioned race. I also was wearing a leather helmet.
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March 25, 1989 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Seven years ago, Barbara Buchan was a world-class cyclist, a promising candidate for the 1984 U.S. Olympic road-racing team. In June 1982, she was entered in a 32-mile race across the Santa Monica Mountains on a course that Olympic Coach Tim Kelly called "the most severe for women cyclists in the world." Buchan was in the midst of a tight pack of riders, descending a steep, curving hill on Mulholland Highway in pursuit of the runaway leader, Pat Hines.
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July 30, 1988 | PATRICIA KLEIN-LERNER, Times Staff Writer
A Van Nuys Superior Court jury Friday awarded $2.3 million to a former Van Nuys resident who suffered serious head injuries in a spill at the start of a 1982 bicycle race in Malibu. Barbara Buchan, 31, of Leucadia, was awarded the money as the result of a 1985 lawsuit filed against the United States Cycling Federation. Buchan's suit accused the federation of negligence in allowing the inexperienced cyclist who caused the crash to participate in the race.
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April 19, 1986 | GORDON MONSON, Times Staff Writer
For a lot of people--at least those who think bicycle racing is for granola-munching, earthy folks--the fact the Encino Velodrome opens its 1986 racing season tonight at 7:30 won't cause a surge of excitement and whip up a mad rush for tickets. But for Encino racers and their hearty little pack of followers, opening night has been a long time coming. In December, two months after the '85 season ended, cyclists were wondering if there would ever be an '86.
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April 1, 1989
As I read Shav Glick's (March 25) article on Barbara Buchan and was cheered by the story of one woman's triumph over adversity, I found myself suddenly jolted by a few paragraphs at the end of the article. It's not pleasant to write hard words about someone who has had their fill of hardship. But having read Buchan's comments on her suit against the U.S. Cycling Federation, I have to say something. I also suffered a head injury in a sanctioned race. I also was wearing a leather helmet.
SPORTS
March 25, 1989 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Seven years ago, Barbara Buchan was a world-class cyclist, a promising candidate for the 1984 U.S. Olympic road-racing team. In June 1982, she was entered in a 32-mile race across the Santa Monica Mountains on a course that Olympic Coach Tim Kelly called "the most severe for women cyclists in the world." Buchan was in the midst of a tight pack of riders, descending a steep, curving hill on Mulholland Highway in pursuit of the runaway leader, Pat Hines.
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