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Barbara Cartland

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was her own best story. They called her the "Queen of Romance." Her biographer described her as "generous, flamboyant, ebullient, witty, intelligent, indiscreet, intolerant, indefatigable and unique." A Times writer once observed that she combined the best attributes of Mae West, the Queen Mother and Glinda the Good. She rode in a white Rolls-Royce, wore white fox furs and pearls, and dictated from a red velvet sofa.
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OPINION
May 11, 2012
Re "Does my writing compute?," Editorial, May 6 Whether this letter is published in The Times depends entirely on the judgment of the editor, who has spent years developing the expertise to evaluate written expression. The same process takes place in the classroom when a teacher grades an essay. No computer software can ever take the place of the wherewithal they respectively bring to their work. Walt Gardner Los Angeles The writer is the author of Education Week's Reality Check blog.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1987 | NANCY MILLS
While Hollywood worries about how to portray personal relationships in the AIDS era, CBS sees one solution: TV movies based on Barbara Cartland books. "People don't roll about naked in my books," Cartland says. "Kissing is only allowed one time. I do allow them to go to bed if they're married, but it's all very wonderful and the moon beams." Cartland, Britain's "queen of romance," has churned out 452 novels at last count. At 86, she still produces a book every two weeks.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
British romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, who became the world's best-selling author by churning out hundreds of romantic sagas, has left no money in her will, the London Daily Mail reported. Dame Barbara, who churned out more than 600 titles in about three dozen languages, died last May at 98. But the newspaper said her $1.7-million estate would be worth nothing after her debts and liabilities were paid.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | CAROL THATCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Thatcher is a London writer
Even for the Queen of Romance, Barbara Cartland's royal and romantic credentials are unique. The author of hundreds of historical romance novels--in which the girl lands the nobleman and lives happily ever after--lives herself in a fairy-tale-pretty Hertfordshire mansion 20 miles from central London and a stone's throw from historic Hatfield House, where in 1558 Elizabeth I received the news that she had become Queen of England.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
British romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, who became the world's best-selling author by churning out hundreds of romantic sagas, has left no money in her will, the London Daily Mail reported. Dame Barbara, who churned out more than 600 titles in about three dozen languages, died last May at 98. But the newspaper said her $1.7-million estate would be worth nothing after her debts and liabilities were paid.
OPINION
May 11, 2012
Re "Does my writing compute?," Editorial, May 6 Whether this letter is published in The Times depends entirely on the judgment of the editor, who has spent years developing the expertise to evaluate written expression. The same process takes place in the classroom when a teacher grades an essay. No computer software can ever take the place of the wherewithal they respectively bring to their work. Walt Gardner Los Angeles The writer is the author of Education Week's Reality Check blog.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
A damsel in distress (a feisty, beautiful damsel, natch), a handsome, brooding lord with a terrible secret, a magnificent castle, an unscrupulous heir, dastardly crimes, plunging decolletage and a lush 19th-Century British setting: Romance fans, this is your night. As fluffy--and as empty--as spun sugar, tonight's TNT movie "Duel of the Hearts" (at 5, 7 and 9 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
TODAY 'Where the Heart Roams' U.S.A., 1987, 81 minutes , 5:30 p.m . George Csicsery's delightful documentary on romance writers and their readers. It's a charmer because Csicsery neither patronizes nor ridicules his subjects (including the bejeweled Barbara Cartland--the genre's octogenarian grand dame), who are largely articulate, middle-class, middle-aged women. We see this vast and lucrative phenomenon as a commentary on what is missing from their lives. RECOMMENDED
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was her own best story. They called her the "Queen of Romance." Her biographer described her as "generous, flamboyant, ebullient, witty, intelligent, indiscreet, intolerant, indefatigable and unique." A Times writer once observed that she combined the best attributes of Mae West, the Queen Mother and Glinda the Good. She rode in a white Rolls-Royce, wore white fox furs and pearls, and dictated from a red velvet sofa.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
A damsel in distress (a feisty, beautiful damsel, natch), a handsome, brooding lord with a terrible secret, a magnificent castle, an unscrupulous heir, dastardly crimes, plunging decolletage and a lush 19th-Century British setting: Romance fans, this is your night. As fluffy--and as empty--as spun sugar, tonight's TNT movie "Duel of the Hearts" (at 5, 7 and 9 p.m.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | CAROL THATCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Thatcher is a London writer
Even for the Queen of Romance, Barbara Cartland's royal and romantic credentials are unique. The author of hundreds of historical romance novels--in which the girl lands the nobleman and lives happily ever after--lives herself in a fairy-tale-pretty Hertfordshire mansion 20 miles from central London and a stone's throw from historic Hatfield House, where in 1558 Elizabeth I received the news that she had become Queen of England.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1987 | NANCY MILLS
While Hollywood worries about how to portray personal relationships in the AIDS era, CBS sees one solution: TV movies based on Barbara Cartland books. "People don't roll about naked in my books," Cartland says. "Kissing is only allowed one time. I do allow them to go to bed if they're married, but it's all very wonderful and the moon beams." Cartland, Britain's "queen of romance," has churned out 452 novels at last count. At 86, she still produces a book every two weeks.
NEWS
March 30, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Princess Diana's father, the 8th Earl Spencer, died Sunday of a heart attack, a spokesman for Humana Wellington Hospital said. He was 68. The princess and her husband, Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, were returning to London from a skiing vacation in Austria. The day before she left for Austria, the princess and her eldest son, 9-year-old Prince William, visited the earl at the hospital where he was being treated for pneumonia.
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