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Barbara Fairchild

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2006 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Bruce David Colen, who reviewed restaurants for Los Angeles magazine from 1974 to 1995, chronicling an era of emerging chefs and the city's growing culinary influence, has died. He was 81. Colen, of Sherman Oaks, died Tuesday of emphysema at Olympia Medical Center in Los Angeles, said his wife, Jane Summer. "Bruce was an elegant and eloquent writer," Barbara Fairchild, editor in chief of Bon Appetit magazine, said in a statement. He "covered the L.A.
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NEWS
May 26, 1999 | IRENE LACHER
Who knew that "the Arch"--as Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu is affectionately known back home in South Africa--does stand-up? After telling the crowd at the Artists for a New South Africa benefit Monday that "you're neat" for supporting the end of apartheid, the cuddly Tutu dipped into a new genre of comedy--South African jokes. "Have you heard the story about the South African who was upset because the Soviet Union and the United States were getting kudos for the space program?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1998 | AL MARTINEZ
For those who suddenly find themselves with huge, ugly creatures they no longer want but can't find a place for, I have a solution: Eat them. The big, ugly creature to which I refer is not your husband but an iguana, a lizard which, I am led to believe, is currently out of favor in L.A. and therefore discardable.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's an old-fashioned broken-in kind of comfort that makes the Farmers Market a great L. A. hangout. It offers the relaxed outdoor ambience that comes from 57 years of mellowing, enough time to work the rough edges off both the furniture and the customers. The kind of place "you can come to with your scary morning hair," says one habitue, Bon Appetit executive editor Barbara Fairchild. "You can just do it."
FOOD
August 8, 1991 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Food styling, by its nature, is the art of deception: embellishing or beautifying the mundane. It creates great potential for misrepresentation of a product or particular dish. And the boundaries of what is legally acceptable are loosely drawn. There are no formal guidelines for the way food companies may showcase their products in advertisements, according to the Federal Trade Commission, which regulates advertising. However, there was a landmark 1960s case that illustrates how far is too far.
NEWS
November 7, 2001 | PETER CARLSON, WASHINGTON POST
Amid the scramble to cover war, terrorism and anthrax, one heartbreaking side effect of the Sept. 11 attacks has received scant public attention: the self-doubt, hand-wringing and existential angst among the editors of America's fluffier magazines. Newsmagazine editors know how to respond to horrific tragedy. They cover it. But what do you do if you're the editor of Vogue or Field & Stream?
NEWS
July 29, 2001 | PATT DIROLL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Too many cooks spoil the broth? Not this time. They didn't spoil the Maine Lobster Ravioli with Ginger Lemon Sauce or the Black Bass with Sweet Clams, Corn and Garlic Puree either. In a kitchen performance pulled off with Swiss-watch precision, 24 star chefs--count 'em, 24--created a seven-course dinner in Westwood's Regency Club kitchen to benefit a fellow chef. The dinner and a silent and live auction titled "Chefs Helping Chefs" was organized by Chef Jean-Francois Meteigner of L.A.'
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | ANN O'NEILL
Elbowing A-listers and Secret Service agents aside at a Beverly Hills charity bash Sunday night, we finally got close enough to former President Bill Clinton to check out those rumors that he's scouting Westside real estate. Our table mate, Raiders quarterback Rodney Peete, a Clinton pal from his days with the Washington Redskins, provided expert blocking. We were in. "What's your name?" Clinton asked, and we experienced firsthand the man's flirty charisma. Focus, girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2003 | AL MARTINEZ
She's as skinny as a chopstick and probably weighs less than Calista Flockhart, but when Joan Luther walks into a Beverly Hills restaurant, there's a stir in the room, like a breeze blowing in through the open door. The maitre d' rushes up, waiters smile and nod, and sometimes the chef, often a celebrity himself, comes out to greet her. It might be one of the restaurants she represents as a publicist, it might not be. The effect is usually the same: She's a presence.
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