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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1992 | Barbara McDougall, Canadian foreign minister, addressed the Los Angeles World Affairs Council on Wednesday. From her prepared text:
Global Cooperation and Security "There are notions around that the end of the Cold War is a signal that we can withdraw from the world, as if what happens in other places is now of concern only to the people who live there. This is seen in the rise of political fundamentalism in Canada, and it is certainly true in the current election race here in the United States.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1992 | Barbara McDougall, Canadian foreign minister, addressed the Los Angeles World Affairs Council on Wednesday. From her prepared text:
Global Cooperation and Security "There are notions around that the end of the Cold War is a signal that we can withdraw from the world, as if what happens in other places is now of concern only to the people who live there. This is seen in the rise of political fundamentalism in Canada, and it is certainly true in the current election race here in the United States.
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NEWS
October 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Canada announced a plan to substantially boost immigration over the next five years while liberalizing rules to attract skilled workers to help fill critical shortages. Ethnic groups praised the increase, saying the Ottawa government is moving toward their demand to increase immigration to roughly equal 1% of Canada's population of 26 million. Immigration Minister Barbara McDougall pledged that the government will strengthen settlement and integration programs.
NEWS
December 5, 1992
Some notable quotes about the impending move into Somalia: 'The warlords will not resist, they understand only power.' --Mohamed Sheikh, Somali refugee 'If they don't stay six or seven months, it's not going to achieve anything. It could actually make it worse.' --Rhodri Wynn-Pope, team leader for CARE International 'We are prepared for hostilities should they occur . . . and if necessary to take preemptive action. This is a potentially dangerous mission.'
BUSINESS
March 26, 1985 | Associated Press
The Canadian government has put together a $255-million program to keep afloat Canadian Commercial Bank, based in Edmonton, Alberta. Minister of State for Finance Barbara McDougall announced the bail-out program Monday, involving the federal and Alberta provincial governments, the Canada Deposit Insurance Corp. and a group of six chartered banks. Canadian Commercial's portfolio has been deteriorating recently, mainly because of some U.S. loans that have gone sour.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1985 | United Press International
The Canadian government has announced plans to liquidate Canadian Commercial Bank only five months after arranging a $186-million U.S. bail-out of the institution. Minister of State for Finance Barbara McDougall said in a statement late Sunday that the bank was no longer viable and could not pay its debts. It is the first forced liquidation of a Canadian bank in at least 50 years.
NEWS
May 15, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mysterious arrival in Canada of Iraq's former ambassador to the United States has led to suspicion here of a secret deal between Ottawa and Washington--and to red faces among Canadian Cabinet ministers who now say they should have kept the Iraqi out. Officials here say they made a mistake in letting Mohammed Mashat move to Canada, but they deny that Washington pushed them to do it.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | SOLL SUSSMAN, Associated Press
A government attempt to clamp down on the flow of refugees into Canada is drawing protests from church and human rights groups. They say it is unjust and won't work. The Canadian Council of Churches has taken the new provisions to court. "We want the law and the practice to live up to what are fundamental principles of justice," Tom Clark, a spokesman for the council, said in an interview.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, in a letter that surprised the inaugural session of a new grouping of former East-West enemies, declared Friday that Russia hopes to join NATO as part of a "long-term political aim." The Russian leader informed the meeting of the new North Atlantic Cooperation Council, a group of foreign ministers from East and West nations, that he fully supports efforts "to create a new system of security from Vancouver to Vladivostok."
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