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Barbra Streisand

ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1994 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Barbra Streisand told a fanatical crowd of well-heeled Brits on Wednesday night that had she been nicer to Prince Charles when she met him on a film set in 1972, "I might have been the first real Jewish Princess." Streisand opened her six-city tour in jam-packed 12,000-seat Wembley Arena, offering a virtual duplicate of a show she tried out in Las Vegas.
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OPINION
May 23, 1993 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a contributing editor to The Times
According to the Washington-based media, a Hollywood-Clinton connection threatens to tear apart the very fabric of this Republic. The response has been a barroom assault on the entertainment industry of unprecedented meanness. Film executives, actors and writers who have met with the President have been dismissed as "nitwits" in leading publications. The critics insist that anyone who works in the L.A.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | LIBBY SLATE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Libby Slate writes regularly for The Times
Barbra Streisand may not ever tour again, but you can still catch her act Sun day at the Academy Plaza Theatre. That's when illusionist Jim Bailey will be strutting his Streisand stuff--fingernails, blond wig and all--performing "People," "The Way We Were" and other numbers from the singing star's shows. His two hourlong concerts, with opening act Kaye Ballard, are part of the "Show of the Month," a musical series designed for audiences older than 50.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Goodbye, Dolly? When the notoriously driven Barbra Streisand hinted four years ago that she felt ready to begin easing up on her career, there were probably more howls of disbelief than the last time Elizabeth Taylor declared her latest marriage was the one that was going to last forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Barbra Streisand is expected to join the entertainment industry's mega-deal bandwagon this week by signing a film and recording contract with Sony Corp. worth a potential $60 million. The agreement--which could be announced as early as Tuesday--reportedly rivals recent multimedia pacts struck by Michael Jackson and Madonna. The signing is the latest in a string of mega-buck pacts triggered in March, 1991 by Janet Jackson's estimated $40-million deal with Virgin Records.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | HENRY ALLEN, TIMES-POST NEWS SERVICE
Barbra Streisand has been a nose revolutionary, a nose nationalist and liberator, a preacher of proboscis pride, a nostro-terrorist, a prophet who saw the pert, snub, freckled, upturned, tidy, tiny, cute all-American cheerleader popularity of the ideal nose personified by Doris Day back in the 1950s, and she bloodied it. "I kept my nose to spite my face," she sings in "I'm Still Here," with new lyrics by Stephen Sondheim.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an evening filled with music, poignancy and a bit of history, Barbra Streisand received the 29th annual American Film Institute Life Achievement Award Thursday. The Brooklyn-born actress and singer became the first woman director to ever achieve this honor. "This is an historic night for AFI," said Jean Picker Firstenberg, AFI director and CEO. "Not only is Streisand the first woman to be honored as a director, she is more." Pointing to Streisand, she said: "You are a national treasure."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2006 | Robert Strauss, Special to The Times
"You never know," said Mary Jonas, clutching a 1964 Playbill for the Philadelphia tryout of what became the Broadway hit "Funny Girl." The program had a smiling 21-year-old Barbra Streisand on the cover. Jonas was 21 then too. "I could get an autograph. She's one mercurial lady, so it might happen. I was there. I am here. So is she."
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | TRACY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In her faux leopard coat and matching pumps, the mannequin looks enough like Barbra Streisand to stop foot traffic on Castro Street. She's sizing herself up in a mirror, feigning a pose from the opening scene of "Funny Girl," in which Fanny Brice pronounces, "Hello Gorgeous!!" It's a tip-off, folks, to what lies beyond this storefront window: a kitschy, 6-month-old museum and store dedicated to Streisand's movies, music and mystique. Hello Gorgeous!!
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