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Barcelona Spain

TRAVEL
October 13, 2002 | Stanley Meisler
Painters such as Pablo Picasso and Joan Miro and architects such as Antonio Gaudi have given this city a reputation as a center of European art. Less known is its role as a musical metropolis. But Barcelona, the capital of the Spanish region of Catalonia, has produced as many virtuoso musicians as artists, and its three houses of music -- the Liceo, the Palau de la Musica Catalana and L'Auditori -- are a delight to patronize, or merely to behold. The musical history is distinguished.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2002 | DAVID BROWN, WASHINGTON POST
It's hard living inside a work of art, especially when living also means dying, giving birth, having surgery, being treated for life-threatening infections and having your bone marrow replaced. For a century, the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau has been one of this city's architectural showpieces and one of its grittiest institutions. It's been a relic worthy of meticulous preservation and a machine racing to keep up with the present. The tension, however, has proved too much.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1999 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
"I'm so glad to be here in your beautiful city," a playful Bruce Springsteen told 22,000 cheering fans with a mock evangelist's fervor as he kicked off his reunion tour with the E Street Band over the weekend. "But I want you to know that we're not here for a casual visit. . . . We're here to rededicate you to the power, the passion, the mystery and the ministry of ROCK 'N' ROLL! I can't promise you life everlastin', but I can promise you life right now. . . ."
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | LEON LAZAROFF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Juan Carlos Padilla lives in an apartment building with crumbling walls, exposed electrical wiring and peeling linoleum floors. It's far from luxurious. But the rent the 27-year-old sometime construction worker pays makes it all worthwhile: nothing. Padilla is among an estimated 1,500 young Spaniards who have taken over empty buildings as homes, triggering major clashes with police seeking to evict them.
SPORTS
August 11, 1992 | MIKE PENNER
From Gaudi to gaudy. That was some torch pass the Olympics made late Sunday night, from castle-topped, sangria-addled Barcelona to chrome mud-flapped Atlanta, which has only four years to measure up to the sensory overload of the past two weeks. By my calculations, all Atlanta needs to do is: --Erect a dozen or so 17th-century cathedrals. --Build a Montjuic. --Buy a culture. --Rent Sagrada Familia. --Hire a king. (Ted Turner has been disqualified.) --Airlift La Rambla. --Age 1,000 years.
NEWS
August 10, 1992 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
Sunday morning, for the first time during the Olympics, the rain in Spain stayed mainly over Barcelona. And when it had ended, when the booming thunderclaps had stopped and the torrents of water had slowed to a trickle, it was strangely quiet. Barcelona, the city that never sleeps, was doing just that. Surely, the quiet was the result of a hangover of emotion. Saturday night, Barcelona simply drank in too much success.
NEWS
August 1, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are setting off-the-field records here, too. No medals, though, and most of the records are not worth bragging about: * Fastest to have $2,000 pinched from his belly bag on a moving subway: Lewis B. Johnson of Los Angeles, on his first ride. * Quickest to lose his luggage and documents from a rented car: Hank Tenney of Lebanon, N.H., within an hour after driving in from France. * Most replacements for stolen or lost passports in a single day: U.S. Consulate, 24.
SPORTS
July 26, 1992 | STEVE JACOBSON, Newsday
America's men and women in blue may be interested to note that in the two days of increased enforcement, Barcelona police issued 600 "parking fines," according to Juan Torres, the mayor's man in charge of traffic. Of them, 12 were for parking in the bus and taxi lane and 300 for "improperly parking" motorbikes and scooters. "That number was much higher than last year at this time," Torres said.
SPORTS
July 26, 1992 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
At 8 p.m. local time, a hush came over the city. It was almost as if a giant Leonard Bernstein had stood, tapped his baton on the podium and raised his arms to signal the magic moment. And then, suddenly, from balcony and corner bar, from high above and down below, came the sounds of symphonies, of musical joy that signaled the beginning of the end of the long wait for the Olympics to take place here.
TRAVEL
July 26, 1992 | COLMAN ANDREWS, Andrews is editor of Traveling in Style magazine and author of "Catalan Cuisine" (Collier) and "Everything on the Table" (Bantam).
What do Sherlock Holmes, Blackcelona, One Way, Touchdown, Yuppies, La Gasolinera, No, Rothko, Unbar, West Coast, Zsa Zsa, Clandestino, Beat, Nick Havanna, Falstaff, Hop, Fin/Al, New Sausalito, Popeye, Speed, Status, Sucesso, Crisis, Karma, The End, Lips, Trip-Tic, Dry Martini, Sidecar, The Daily Telegraph, Let's Go, Hollywood, Paris, Maryland, Zurich, Soweto and Ping Pong have in common? They're all names of bars in Barcelona.
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