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Bariatric Surgery

NEWS
March 27, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A pair of landmark studies demonstrated that weight-loss surgery may be the best solution for Type 2 diabetics with poor control over their blood sugar. So, now what? Experts say that diabetes care is likely to undergo a profound shift. But before diabetics get in line for space on the operating table, a lot of questions need to be answered. Not least of those, say clinicians, is who will do those operations, how well and for how much. Bariatric surgery has exploded in recent years, and with that growth have come concerns about quality of care and patient safety.
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NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Weight-loss surgery clearly cuts the risk of heart attacks, strokes and death from cardiovascular disease, a new study shows. But the research also raises questions regarding which patients benefit the most from surgery. The study, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , is the first controlled clinical trial to measure the impact of bariatric surgery on heart health. The Swedish Obese Subjects study compared 2,010 middle-aged, obese people who had weight-loss surgery with 2,037 similar obese people who received normal medical care, which usually included counseling on lifestyle choices that affect weight.
NEWS
August 16, 2010
In its potential to fight Type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery is looking good -- very good. Bariatric surgeons themselves noticed the operation's potential some time ago, as these earlier stories noted: Gastric bypass: Is it a diabetes fix? Weight-loss surgery may soon be widely used Then other studies began to confirm the operation's ability to help patients quickly get control of their disease. Now we have a study, published Monday in Archives of Surgery, analyzing diabetes-drug use and healthcare costs in the wake of bariatric surgery.
SCIENCE
October 22, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
While diet and exercise are available to all, bariatric surgery is likely to remain a solution available to just a small fraction of the 90 million Americans who are obese. But when it comes to inducing weight loss and improving obesity-related health conditions, a new study has found that there really is no contest between the two: Procedures such as gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding beat diet and exercise. By a long shot. A new study published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal finds that among subjects followed for at least six months and as long as two years, those who got weight-loss surgery lost on average 57 more pounds than those in nonsurgical weight programs.
HEALTH
January 15, 2007 | From Times wire reports
More than 120,000 obese Americans had some kind of surgery to help them lose weight in 2004, with the biggest increase among middle-aged people, according to a study released Wednesday. In 1998, 772 people age 55 to 64 had gastric bypass, stapling or some similar procedure known as bariatric surgery to help weight loss. But that number ballooned to 15,086 in 2004, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality reported.
SCIENCE
January 3, 2010 | By Shari Roan
After spending the majority of her 48 years trying, and failing, to slim down, Veronica Mahaffey was still 50 pounds overweight -- not morbidly obese by a long shot, but still far from the size she wanted. Worried about her health, she called a San Diego weight-loss surgery clinic last spring and asked for help. She was told no. At 185 pounds and with a body mass index of 28, the Ramona mother of four was not heavy enough to meet medical guidelines or insurance company qualifications for weight-loss surgery.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The weight loss that follows a successful bariatric surgery makes most patients feel younger. But a new study suggests that following bariatric surgery, some patients show signs of being biologically younger, as well. At Stanford University, researchers looked for evidence of change in bariatric surgery patients by measuring their telomeres -- regions of repeating DNA sequences at the end of a chromosome that grow a little shorter with age and chronic illness. Telomeres are considered a biomarker of the aging process.
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Weight-loss surgery for morbidly obese adolescents has become more popular even though many questions about safety and effectiveness remain, according to a commentary published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine . Until more is known about the long-term effects of such surgery, stringent requirements to qualify for the surgery should remain in place, said the author of the report. Weight-loss, or bariatric, surgery is much more common among adults, and studies show it produces many benefits for most patients.
SCIENCE
May 7, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
An estimated 220,000 Americans undergo some type of bariatric surgery each year, and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has revealed that he is one of them. The high-profile Republican - who hasn't revealed his weight but is estimated to tip the scales at between 300 and 350 pounds - said he went under the knife for a 40-minute lap band procedure on a Saturday morning in February. In less than three months, he has lost about 40 pounds, according to sources cited in various reports . A lap band procedure involves fitting an inflatable silicone ring around the stomach to reduce food intake.
NEWS
October 10, 2010
News from the Obesity Society annual meeting in San Diego: -- Doctors have tried inserting a balloon into the stomach to make a person feel full so he won't eat as much and will lose weight. Now scientists are turning to a similar strategy that involves swallowing a capsule. -- Researchers in Calgary reported Sunday that they had devised fake food, or pseudofood, to make people feel fuller. The method involved filling a gelatin capsule made of biocompatible and biodegradable materials with expandable, absorbent fiber and polymer granules.
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