Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBarley
IN THE NEWS

Barley

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 9, 2011 | By Andrew Leckey
Question: Something bad has happened to my Boston Beer Co. shares, and I want to know if problems will continue. Answer: The maker of Samuel Adams beer must contend with the higher cost of barley, a key ingredient in its brews, as well as competitive pressures. Although it is the leading producer in the highly fragmented U.S. craft brew industry, it accounts for less than 1% of the total U.S. beer market. Growth potential therefore is a major consideration for its stock.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
You don't just have to be a cereal or beer fan -- or a natural foods junkie -- to love barley. This ancient grain has long been used in a variety of ways, and it's perfect for adding substance and heft to a variety of recipes, from breads to soups and stews, as well as salads. Check out these ideas: Cucumber and yogurt soup with barley: For a soup at once filling and refreshing, you can't beat this recipe, which combines cool cucumbers and yogurt with fresh garlic, mint and dill, along with pearl barley and crunchy walnuts.
Advertisement
FOOD
November 10, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: I have never been able to find a vegetable soup that comes close to Coral Tree Café's . I know they must have a secret ingredient in there that gives it that extra something special! With fall approaching (and hopefully cooler temperatures), I would love to make this soup at home. Emily Baker Santa Monica Dear Emily: Coral Tree Café was happy to share its vegetable soup recipe, which we've adapted below. Enjoy! Coral Tree Café's vegetable soup Total time: 1 hour Servings: 8 to 10 Note: Adapted from Coral Tree Café in Los Angeles.
SCIENCE
July 5, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
A rich trove of artifacts and plant remains excavated from southwestern Iran suggest that ancient humans' transition from hunting and gathering to farming occurred throughout the Fertile Crescent at roughly the same time. The excavation also revealed that this crucial change - which helped the region earn its reputation as the cradle of civilization - happened gradually over thousands of years , not in a few generations or centuries as previously thought, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science.
SCIENCE
July 5, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
A rich trove of artifacts and plant remains excavated from southwestern Iran suggest that ancient humans' transition from hunting and gathering to farming occurred throughout the Fertile Crescent at roughly the same time. The excavation also revealed that this crucial change - which helped the region earn its reputation as the cradle of civilization - happened gradually over thousands of years , not in a few generations or centuries as previously thought, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1986
The protest had barred the unloading of a barley ship at the Port of Stockton after the grain dealer announced that it has no immediate plans for future imports. The American Agriculture Movement claimed that Continental Grain Co. agreed not to import any more barley or handle any commodity at American ports unless the price meets the cost of domestic production. The dispute began 11 days ago when longshoremen at the port honored farm pickets against unloading the ship from New Zealand.
FOOD
January 14, 1998 | CHARLES PERRY
A thousand years ago, Middle Eastern cooks used a condiment called murri made from doughnut-shaped loaves of rotted barley. The Food section, ever unwilling to pass up a new (or old) taste sensation, is rotting some barley according to the ancient instructions, and we will keep you up to date on how it does, what it tastes like and exactly how dangerous it would be to eat. Now, apparently nobody has made murri for about 600 years, so this is a little experimental.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
If you're looking for a simple dinner that will help to stave off the chilly wet weather, look no further than Coral Tree Cafe's vegetable soup. Fresh vegetables simmered with barley in a hearty broth, it makes for a perfect one-dish meal. What's more, you might not even notice it's vegetarian. (Of course, you can add some meat or doctor the ingredients to suit your taste.) You can find the recipe here. For more quick-fix dinner ideas, check out our video recipe gallery here . Food Editor Russ Parsons and Test Kitchen manager Noelle Carter show you how to fix a dozen dishes in an hour or less.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1989 | From Times wire services
Taiwan will send five missions to the United States between August and early 1990 to buy American products worth about $1.5 billion to help narrow the trade gap between the two countries, officials said today. Chang Chung-chien, vice economic minister, told reporters that an agricultural team will leave in August to buy about 600,000 tons of wheat and 50,000 tons of barley. This will be followed by an industrial group that will buy machinery and equipment for power stations, oil refineries, petrochemical plants and telecommunications networks.
FOOD
November 10, 2011 | By Noelle Carter
Dear SOS: I have never been able to find a vegetable soup that comes close to Coral Tree Cafe's. I know they must have a secret ingredient in there that gives it that extra something special! With fall approaching (and hopefully cooler temperatures), I would love to make this soup at home. Emily Baker Santa Monica Dear Emily: Coral Tree Cafe was happy to share its vegetable soup recipe, which we've adapted below. Enjoy! -- Coral Tree Cafe's vegetable soup Total time: 1 hour Servings: 8 to 10 Note: Adapted from Coral Tree Cafe in Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
Ever thought homemade bagels were possible? And great bagels at that? They are, and Peter Reinhart wrote a great story for Food to share his secrets :  " What I am about to explain could get me barred from the Lincoln and Holland tunnels or any other routes into Manhattan. But as a baker who loves bagels and all the things that can go on them, I am duty-bound to dispel urban legends and to tell you that anyone can make great bagels at home, no matter where you live.... "Bagels are about the simplest of all breads to make.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
If you're looking for a simple dinner that will help to stave off the chilly wet weather, look no further than Coral Tree Cafe's vegetable soup. Fresh vegetables simmered with barley in a hearty broth, it makes for a perfect one-dish meal. What's more, you might not even notice it's vegetarian. (Of course, you can add some meat or doctor the ingredients to suit your taste.) You can find the recipe here. For more quick-fix dinner ideas, check out our video recipe gallery here . Food Editor Russ Parsons and Test Kitchen manager Noelle Carter show you how to fix a dozen dishes in an hour or less.
NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Charles Perry
Most societies that make bread also make some kind of beer. In a way, beer is just a batch of bread gone wrong. If batter contains the enzymes to convert starch to fermentable sugars, either from sprouted grain (malt) or saliva (if the grain has been chewed), it will turn into beer, though not exactly a well-hopped lager with a creamy head of foam. As beers still are in some remote places, it will be a bit sour, only slightly alcoholic and so porridge-like it provides B vitamins as well as carbohydrates.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Charles Perry
To Americans, "loaf-shaped" connotes something rectangular with definite square corners. That wouldn't occur to people in most of Europe, where nearly all breads are baked free-standing--the long French and Italian loaves, the round rustic breads found from Russia to Spain, fancy braided harvest loaves and so on. Only in the Netherlands and the English-speaking world is bread usually baked in rectangular loaf pans. England and Holland changed to the loaf pan because it was more convenient for bakers and in order to get a higher loaf (because the dough can't spread sideways as it bakes, loaf-pan bread rises higher)
FOOD
November 10, 2011 | By Noelle Carter
Dear SOS: I have never been able to find a vegetable soup that comes close to Coral Tree Cafe's. I know they must have a secret ingredient in there that gives it that extra something special! With fall approaching (and hopefully cooler temperatures), I would love to make this soup at home. Emily Baker Santa Monica Dear Emily: Coral Tree Cafe was happy to share its vegetable soup recipe, which we've adapted below. Enjoy! -- Coral Tree Cafe's vegetable soup Total time: 1 hour Servings: 8 to 10 Note: Adapted from Coral Tree Cafe in Los Angeles.
FOOD
November 10, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: I have never been able to find a vegetable soup that comes close to Coral Tree Café's . I know they must have a secret ingredient in there that gives it that extra something special! With fall approaching (and hopefully cooler temperatures), I would love to make this soup at home. Emily Baker Santa Monica Dear Emily: Coral Tree Café was happy to share its vegetable soup recipe, which we've adapted below. Enjoy! Coral Tree Café's vegetable soup Total time: 1 hour Servings: 8 to 10 Note: Adapted from Coral Tree Café in Los Angeles.
FOOD
June 5, 1986 | JUDY ZEIDLER, Zeidler is a free-lance writer who teaches Jewish and other ethnic cookery. and
The Jewish holiday Shavuot marks the onset of the wheat harvest, as well as the gathering of the season's first fruits. In ancient lore, harvests included wheat, barley, grapes, figs, honey and olives. It is also traditional to serve milk, eggs and cheese that were often encased in doughs, in dishes such as kreplach and blintzes. This year, Shavuot, which also marks an important religious event--the receiving of the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai--will be celebrated next Thursday.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2011 | By Andrew Leckey
Question: Something bad has happened to my Boston Beer Co. shares, and I want to know if problems will continue. Answer: The maker of Samuel Adams beer must contend with the higher cost of barley, a key ingredient in its brews, as well as competitive pressures. Although it is the leading producer in the highly fragmented U.S. craft brew industry, it accounts for less than 1% of the total U.S. beer market. Growth potential therefore is a major consideration for its stock.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|