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October 24, 2003 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
An overwhelming majority of Americans continue to believe that there is life after death and that heaven and hell exist, according to a new study. What's more, nearly two-thirds think they are heaven-bound. On the other hand, only one-half of 1% said they were hell-bound, according to a national poll by the Oxnard-based Barna Research Group, an independent marketing research firm that has tracked trends related to beliefs, values and behaviors since 1984.
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October 24, 2003 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
An overwhelming majority of Americans continue to believe that there is life after death and that heaven and hell exist, according to a new study. What's more, nearly two-thirds think they are heaven-bound. On the other hand, only one-half of 1% said they were hell-bound, according to a national poll by the Oxnard-based Barna Research Group, an independent marketing research firm that has tracked trends related to beliefs, values and behaviors since 1984.
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September 11, 2000 | BILL BROADWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Some faith adages roll off the tongue, like "God helps those who help themselves." But that particular saying is not biblical and, in fact, violates a primary scriptural teaching that only God determines a person's destiny, according to religion analyst George Barna. To see how many people would agree with the saying, Barna included it among 14 statements in a survey of religious beliefs conducted recently by his Oxnard-based research organization.
NEWS
September 11, 2000 | BILL BROADWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Some faith adages roll off the tongue, like "God helps those who help themselves." But that particular saying is not biblical and, in fact, violates a primary scriptural teaching that only God determines a person's destiny, according to religion analyst George Barna. To see how many people would agree with the saying, Barna included it among 14 statements in a survey of religious beliefs conducted recently by his Oxnard-based research organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1998 | COLL METCALFE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is something immensely pleasing, George Barna says, in knowing the subtleties of moral beliefs in the country, how religious views are stratified along generational lines and in what direction the nation's spiritual compass is pointing. But for Barna, it's more than pleasing--it's part of the job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2000 | Religion News Service
The percentage of Asian Americans who can be considered born-again Christians has increased significantly in the last decade, according to a new poll from the Ventura-based Barna Research Group. In 1991, 5% of Asian Americans said they had made personal commitments to Jesus Christ and believed they would have eternal life because they accepted him as their savior. The figure increased to 27% in a recent poll, higher than the 23% figure for Latinos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001 | From Times staff and wire reports
One-third of U.S. churchgoers say they experience God's presence at every worship service, another third say they have that experience often and the final third say they have such feelings less frequently, a marketing research company reports. Men said they had such experiences less often than women did, according to the Ventura-based Barna Research Group. Researchers found that 68% of churchgoing adults said they always "look forward to worshiping God."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2001 | Religion News Service
About a quarter of Americans have a strong belief that Satan is real, and Mormons are most likely to accept that he is more than a mere symbol of evil, Barna Research Group reports. Researchers found that 27% of those polled strongly believe that Satan is real. Fifty-nine percent of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints believe Satan is real, while about one-fifth of Catholics, Episcopalians and Methodists think so.
NEWS
January 17, 1998 | Jack Robinson
State and federal agencies will pay $2.8 million for flood-control improvements in Simi Valley that will allow owners of some homes damaged in the Northridge earthquake to rebuild--four years later (B1). . . . Widening a channel will reduce flood risk for about 300 homes, opening the way for financial help that had been withheld. "This should help resolve one of the most difficult, ongoing problems created by the Northridge earthquake," Supervisor Judy Mikels said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1999 | Religion News Service
Four in 10 Americans contribute neither money nor time to helping the poor, according to a survey, even though most Americans agree that society has a moral obligation to help the poor. A survey by Barna Research Group of 1,002 U.S. adults found that more than 70% of them agreed that society has a moral obligation to aid those suffering through poverty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1998 | COLL METCALFE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is something immensely pleasing, George Barna says, in knowing the subtleties of moral beliefs in the country, how religious views are stratified along generational lines and in what direction the nation's spiritual compass is pointing. But for Barna, it's more than pleasing--it's part of the job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Despite the attention to the nation's largest churches, 41% of churchgoing adults worship at churches with 100 or fewer adults in attendance on an average weekend, a Barna Research Group survey shows. In comparison, only 12% of churchgoing adults are found on the average weekend in churches where there are 1,000 or more adults attending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1998 | MICHAEL J. PAQUETTE, RELIGION NEWS SERVICE
Think fast: How many Americans went to church last weekend? Forty percent? Twenty percent? Somewhere in between? Whatever the guess, it might be right. For years, some polling groups and sociologists who specialize in tracking the religious behavior of Americans have been at odds trying to get a handle on how many of us go to worship services on a regular basis.
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