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December 13, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES
In the great American tradition of rugged individualism, Barney Childs started writing music simply because he wanted to. He had no teacher, so he taught himself. "I wanted to fool around," he said in a recent interview from the University of Redlands, where he has taught since 1971. "Somebody gave me a recording of Tchaikovsky's Fourth Symphony when I was 15. It made interesting sounds. . . . "The other thing was when I was working as assistant in the library (in his native Spokane, Wash.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES
In the great American tradition of rugged individualism, Barney Childs started writing music simply because he wanted to. He had no teacher, so he taught himself. "I wanted to fool around," he said in a recent interview from the University of Redlands, where he has taught since 1971. "Somebody gave me a recording of Tchaikovsky's Fourth Symphony when I was 15. It made interesting sounds. . . . "The other thing was when I was working as assistant in the library (in his native Spokane, Wash.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2006 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Does anyone remember a time when record labels had their own sounds? Can you recall the last time you bought a CD solely on the basis of what the label was? Yep, the reviewer is showing his age deep in the digital-downloading era, but the fact is there are still a few labels out there that insist on maintaining a certain profile. One obvious example is Germany's hardy ECM outfit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2002
Movies Web-master "Spider-Man" spins his way onto the big screen Friday in the guise of Tobey Maguire. Sam Raimi directs as Peter Parker's alter ego squares off against the Green Goblin (Willem Dafoe). Kirsten Dunst, above right with Maguire, co-stars. Also: Woody Allen's "Hollywood Ending" is about a washed-up director who suffers psychosomatic blindness during the shooting of his comeback movie. With Tea Leoni, George Hamilton and Treat Williams. Opens Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA
A reluctant urbanite, Morten Lauridsen is a composer who escapes the city whenever possible and retreats to "my shack" on Waldron Island, one of the 150 San Juan Islands just inside the United States border in the Strait of Georgia, and off the northernmost coast of Washington. There, says Lauridsen, he chooses his projects and prepares to compose. The actual composition is done when the writer returns to California.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2002 | MARK SWED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
May Day is noise day. Demonstrators take to the streets; revelers too. Wednesday night, leaving downtown for midtown, one could hear the sounds of 10,000 marchers on Spring Street demanding rights for illegal immigrants; listen to a radio report about a million in Paris protesting Le Pen; and then, facing blaring boring music from a private fund-raising party, attempt to walk up the steps of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, past guards stationed to divert concertgoers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1987 | KENNETH HERMAN
Musicians have long been favorite subjects for painters, from the angelic instrumentalists of medieval iconographers to Picasso's Cubist guitarists. Local musicians will be returning the favor over the next five weeks with a series of period concerts at the San Diego Museum of Art. The concerts are part of the events planned for the current "More Than Meets the Eye" exhibition.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES
For those who think that Handel wrote the last biblical oratorios, consider Arthur Honegger's "King David." Composed in 1921, "King David" traces the life of David--from boy-hero to great king and death--through solo arias, choruses and straight narration. In short, it is an oratorio. Though one of Honegger's most popular works in his lifetime, "King David" has not received many local performances.
NEWS
January 15, 2000
Arthur Batanides, 77, a character actor in television series ranging from science fiction to comedies, westerns and police shows, and in such films as "Police Academy." Born in Tacoma, Wash., Batanides got hooked on acting during World War II when he entertained his fellow soldiers in Europe with comedy routines. Later he studied drama at Los Angeles' now-defunct Actors Lab.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2000
A selective look at deaths in arts and entertainment from Jan. 1 through Dec. 20. For a more comprehensive list, visit the Calendar Web site at www.calendarlive.com. George Carl, vaudeville, circus, movie comedian, 83, Jan. 1 "Skipper Frank" Herman, '50s KTLA kids-show host, 83, Jan. 4 Henry Pleasants, critic who recognized jazz as serious music, 89, Jan. 4 Lucas Hoving, dancer, choreographer, teacher, 87, Jan. 5 Vic Schoen, composer, arranger, Andrews Sisters musical director, 83, Jan.
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