Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBarney Rosset
IN THE NEWS

Barney Rosset

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Barney Rosset, who died Tuesday at the age of 89, was the most important American publisher of the 20th century. Sure, he was part of a lineage; it's difficult to imagine Rosset doing what he did for more than 30 years at Grove Press without the example of James Laughlin at the seminal independent New Directions or (further afield) Jack Kahane at Paris' Obelisk Press. And yet Grove, which Rosset bought in 1951 for $3,000 and ran until 1985, remains the touchstone, the publisher most responsible for breaking down American literary puritanism, for defending the idea that art, that literature, is meant to unsettle us, that among its central purposes is to challenge the status quo. Look at the writers Rosset published: Henry Miller, Samuel Beckett, William S. Burroughs, Eugene Ionesco, Jean Genet, Malcolm X. Look at the books that he brought into the center of the culture: "Tropic of Cancer," "Waiting for Godot," "Naked Lunch," "Our Lady of the Flowers," "A Confederacy of Dunces," "Cain's Book.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Barney Rosset, who died Tuesday at the age of 89, was the most important American publisher of the 20th century. Sure, he was part of a lineage; it's difficult to imagine Rosset doing what he did for more than 30 years at Grove Press without the example of James Laughlin at the seminal independent New Directions or (further afield) Jack Kahane at Paris' Obelisk Press. And yet Grove, which Rosset bought in 1951 for $3,000 and ran until 1985, remains the touchstone, the publisher most responsible for breaking down American literary puritanism, for defending the idea that art, that literature, is meant to unsettle us, that among its central purposes is to challenge the status quo. Look at the writers Rosset published: Henry Miller, Samuel Beckett, William S. Burroughs, Eugene Ionesco, Jean Genet, Malcolm X. Look at the books that he brought into the center of the culture: "Tropic of Cancer," "Waiting for Godot," "Naked Lunch," "Our Lady of the Flowers," "A Confederacy of Dunces," "Cain's Book.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Barney Rosset, the renegade founder of Grove Press who fought groundbreaking legal battles against censorship and introduced American readers to such provocative writers as Harold Pinter, Samuel Beckett, Eugene Ionesco and Jean Genet, died Tuesday in New York City. He was 89. His daughter, Tansey Rosset, said he died after undergoing surgery to replace a heart valve. In 1951 Rosset bought tiny Grove Press, named after the Greenwich Village street where it was located, and turned it into one of the most influential publishing companies of its time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Barney Rosset, the renegade founder of Grove Press who fought groundbreaking legal battles against censorship and introduced American readers to such provocative writers as Harold Pinter, Samuel Beckett, Eugene Ionesco and Jean Genet, died Tuesday in New York City. He was 89. His daughter, Tansey Rosset, said he died after undergoing surgery to replace a heart valve. In 1951 Rosset bought tiny Grove Press, named after the Greenwich Village street where it was located, and turned it into one of the most influential publishing companies of its time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Michael Stern Hart, a burly rebel whose vision of a literate society led him to pioneer the electronic book decades before the spread of the Internet, has died. He was 64. The founder of the online library Project Gutenberg, Hart had been in poor health and was found Tuesday at his Urbana, Ill., home, said Project Gutenberg Chief Executive Gregory B. Newby. An autopsy is underway to determine the cause of death. Hart was a freshman at the University of Illinois in 1971 when he was granted free access to the campus' enormous mainframe computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2010
Paris-based fashion house Thierry Mugler has tapped Lady Gaga's stylist, Nicola Formichetti, as creative director for its women's and menswear labels. The label said Monday that Formichetti, who is also fashion director with Vogue Hommes Japan, is to begin with the fall-winter 2011-12 collections. Formichetti, a half-Japanese, half-Italian 33-year-old, replaces Spaniard Rosemary Rodriguez. Formichetti will oversee Mugler's head women's designer Sebastien Peigne, formerly of Balenciaga, and head menswear designer Romain Kremer, who also designs his own signature label.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2008 | Kevin Thomas; Gary Goldstein; Michael Ordona
Neil Ortenberg and Daniel O'Connor's "Obscene" is as vital, incisive and entertaining as its subject, Barney Rosset, who in his 80s is as witty and impassioned as ever in his defense of the freedom of expression. The founder of Grove Press and the Evergreen Review, those bugaboos of the censorious in the '60s and '70s, once said, "I feel personally there hasn't been a word written or uttered that shouldn't be published. " Rosset has spent his life -- and lost a fortune -- in living up to that belief.
BOOKS
August 17, 1986 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
Over at Grove Press, the lawsuits and hard feelings continue to fly between founder Barney Rosset and new owners Ann Getty and Lord George Weidenfeld. Fired from the top job, Rosset not only finds himself out of a job, but in possession of previously unpublished manuscripts by longtime Grove author Samuel Beckett. First to reach Rosset was "Eleutheria," a full-length play Beckett wrote in French around 1946, roughly the same time he wrote "Waiting for Godot."
BOOKS
February 25, 2001 | KENT CARROLL, Kent Carroll, a longtime publishing executive, is publisher and editor-in-chief of Carroll & Graf, a subsidiary of the Avalon Publishing Group
In 1951, Barney Rosset bought a small, failing reprint publisher that took its name from the Greenwich Village street on which it was housed. He paid $3,000 for Grove Press. Rosset was 29, a World War II veteran, recently separated from his first wife, painter Joan Mitchell, who had been his high school sweetheart.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
This year's National Book Awards, taking place in New York on Nov. 19, will include a Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters to Maxine Hong Kingston. The Oakland-based Kingston, whose books include the memoir "The Woman Warrior," was awarded the Robert Kirsch Award for Lifetime Achievement at the Los Angeles Times Book Festival in April. The awards also will recognize Barney Rosset, former publisher of the Evergreen Review and Grove Press, with the Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Michael Stern Hart, a burly rebel whose vision of a literate society led him to pioneer the electronic book decades before the spread of the Internet, has died. He was 64. The founder of the online library Project Gutenberg, Hart had been in poor health and was found Tuesday at his Urbana, Ill., home, said Project Gutenberg Chief Executive Gregory B. Newby. An autopsy is underway to determine the cause of death. Hart was a freshman at the University of Illinois in 1971 when he was granted free access to the campus' enormous mainframe computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2010
Paris-based fashion house Thierry Mugler has tapped Lady Gaga's stylist, Nicola Formichetti, as creative director for its women's and menswear labels. The label said Monday that Formichetti, who is also fashion director with Vogue Hommes Japan, is to begin with the fall-winter 2011-12 collections. Formichetti, a half-Japanese, half-Italian 33-year-old, replaces Spaniard Rosemary Rodriguez. Formichetti will oversee Mugler's head women's designer Sebastien Peigne, formerly of Balenciaga, and head menswear designer Romain Kremer, who also designs his own signature label.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2008 | Kevin Thomas; Gary Goldstein; Michael Ordona
Neil Ortenberg and Daniel O'Connor's "Obscene" is as vital, incisive and entertaining as its subject, Barney Rosset, who in his 80s is as witty and impassioned as ever in his defense of the freedom of expression. The founder of Grove Press and the Evergreen Review, those bugaboos of the censorious in the '60s and '70s, once said, "I feel personally there hasn't been a word written or uttered that shouldn't be published. " Rosset has spent his life -- and lost a fortune -- in living up to that belief.
BOOKS
February 25, 2001 | KENT CARROLL, Kent Carroll, a longtime publishing executive, is publisher and editor-in-chief of Carroll & Graf, a subsidiary of the Avalon Publishing Group
In 1951, Barney Rosset bought a small, failing reprint publisher that took its name from the Greenwich Village street on which it was housed. He paid $3,000 for Grove Press. Rosset was 29, a World War II veteran, recently separated from his first wife, painter Joan Mitchell, who had been his high school sweetheart.
BOOKS
August 17, 1986 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
Over at Grove Press, the lawsuits and hard feelings continue to fly between founder Barney Rosset and new owners Ann Getty and Lord George Weidenfeld. Fired from the top job, Rosset not only finds himself out of a job, but in possession of previously unpublished manuscripts by longtime Grove author Samuel Beckett. First to reach Rosset was "Eleutheria," a full-length play Beckett wrote in French around 1946, roughly the same time he wrote "Waiting for Godot."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2008 | Carolyn Kellogg, Special to The Times
The finalists for the National Book Award in fiction, announced Wednesday at the Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago, offered an interesting mix of newcomers and veterans. Rachel Kushner, a Los Angeles writer, and Salvatore Scibona have both been nominated for their first novels: "Telex From Cuba" and "The End," respectively. Aleksandar Hemon received a 2004 MacArthur "Genius" Grant yet is also a relative newcomer; "The Lazarus Project" is his second novel (he's also published a collection of short fiction)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Joan Mitchell Lady Painter Patricia Albers Alfred A. Knopf: 517 pp., $40 Joan Mitchell didn't suffer fools. The famously cantankerous artist didn't suffer many friends either. If biographer Patricia Albers sizes up her subject accurately, Mitchell's scattershot rage was fallout from a nearly lifelong battle to prove herself to a father "who never let her forget that he needed a son, not a daughter" and to an art world that had little respect for women's work. Mitchell retaliated by calling herself a "lady painter" while emulating the worst behavior of her male colleagues.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|