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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010 | By Margaret Wappler
The hidden gem: Sometimes it's the worst destiny that can befall a Los Angeles institution. But judging by the sold-out crowd at Barnsdall Art Park's Friday Wine Tasting last weekend, it's possible to reverse fate. Approximately 450 people turned out to enjoy, looking like so many Greek gods in the golden light of a California sunset, with lavish picnics and chubby babies in tow. In the last couple of years, the Barnsdall Art Park Foundation has tasked itself with reintroducing the bucolic retreat perched at the top of Olive Hill to its neighbors in Los Feliz.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
For its 90th birthday, Frank Lloyd Wright's Hollyhock House is getting another round of rejuvenating restoration work, with the partial makeover priced at $4.3 million. Work on the city-owned National Historic Landmark perched on a Hollywood hilltop will begin after Memorial Day; the current five-day schedule of guided tours will be reduced to Fridays through Sundays during the renovations, which are expected to take about 18 months. The project is the third phase in the ongoing restoration of Hollyhock House — the first two phases, from 2000 to 2005, cost $21 million, mainly to repair damage from the 1994 Northridge earthquake and stabilize the Barnsdall Park hillside fronting Hollywood Boulevard.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2000
Re "Renovation to Interrupt Barnsdall Park Traditions," May 30: The article was a trip down memory lane for me. I remember, 70 years ago, spending more time on "Olive Hill" than I did at home or at Los Feliz School across the street. We grew up on the hill, making lead soldiers, catching polliwogs and riding our homemade coasters down the hill's dirt roads from the top to the streets below. Nobody had any money, and nobody needed any. Sweet days. DONALD B. BROWN Torrance
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010 | By Margaret Wappler
The hidden gem: Sometimes it's the worst destiny that can befall a Los Angeles institution. But judging by the sold-out crowd at Barnsdall Art Park's Friday Wine Tasting last weekend, it's possible to reverse fate. Approximately 450 people turned out to enjoy, looking like so many Greek gods in the golden light of a California sunset, with lavish picnics and chubby babies in tow. In the last couple of years, the Barnsdall Art Park Foundation has tasked itself with reintroducing the bucolic retreat perched at the top of Olive Hill to its neighbors in Los Feliz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1989
Los Angeles art collector and benefactor Frederik R. Weisman announced Thursday that he will donate $100,000 to the city for the construction of a sculpture garden to help revive historic Barnsdall Park and its cultural center in Hollywood. The grant by the Frederik R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1991
The Los Angeles Board of Recreation and Parks Commissioners voted Friday to allow a portion of Barnsdall Park in Hollywood to be used as an excavation site for the Metro Rail subway system. The commission accepted in principle the offer of the Metro Rail builder, Rail Construction Corp., to pay the city millions of dollars for improvements to the cultural center, but exact terms have yet to be determined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1989 | ESTHER SCHRADER, Times Staff Writer
Barnsdall Park, at the crest of a hill in Los Feliz, stands on the threshold of a renaissance, its garden blooming again, the olive trees coming back and its future seemingly blessed by a promise from city officials to restore it as the cultural center it was designed to be.
REAL ESTATE
September 21, 1986 | Sam Hall Kaplan
Barnsdall Park, for years, has been less of a park than a bureaucratic jungle, with a variety of city agencies squabbling over whose turf it is. Often stumbling over themselves and each other have been the departments of Recreation and Parks, General Services, Cultural Affairs and Public Works and the city's administrative office. The bureaucrats have been guided, as usual, by the Catch-22 macro ecopolitical mathematical formula: Promises=megalomania paranoia=inaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
The Jean Cocteau Centenary Festival, a monthlong series of events paying tribute to the work and influence of the French writer/artist (1889-1963), is under way at Barnsdall Park as a co-production of the Severin Wunderman Museum and the Cultural Arts Department of the City of Los Angeles. Joining "Hands on Cocteau," a drawing workshop today for children and families (at the park's junior arts center) is a new collection of performance works, "In the Spirit of Jean Cocteau." Concluding its three-day run today at Barnsdall Gallery Theatre, the program features "Cocteau en Californie" by Blue Palm (Tom Crocker and Jackie Planeix)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1990 | TERRY McQUILKIN
Perhaps it was fitting that Steve Reich was the one major composer represented on Saturday's program at Barnsdall Park. While the three relatively new works on the program delivered by the new-music ensemble eXindigo! are not strictly minimalist, each shows minimalist traits.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2010 | By Mike Boehm
The slashing of Los Angeles' municipal arts offerings is underway, with seven layoffs to take effect April 1 and eight more expected when the fiscal year ends June 30, as City Hall tries to cope with a budget crisis. Olga Garay, executive director of the Department of Cultural Affairs, said Monday that she had to figure out how the Warner Grand Theatre in San Pedro and the William Grant Still Arts Center in West Adams will be staffed after the April 1 layoffs of their directors. And the City Council may get an earful at its meeting Wednesday from supporters of four neighborhood arts centers -- two in Barnsdall Park in Hollywood, two next to the Watts Towers -- that are among nine facilities City Hall wants to unload on private nonprofit operators, in hopes of cutting jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum
If the several hundred people who attended the Los Angeles Anarchist Book Fair on Sunday had been asked to explain their political identity, they would have given several hundred different answers. They might have said they were earth liberation anarchists, or indigenous rights anarchists, or Christian anarchists. They might have called themselves feminist anarchists, insurrectionist anarchists or radical queer punks. On the grassy hilltop of Barnsdall Art Park, where the event was held, the array of anarchists flipped through thick tomes of political theory and picked through stacks of homemade propaganda pamphlets.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2009 | David Pagel
This year's exhibition of artworks by the winners of the city of Los Angeles' $10,000 Individual Artist Fellowships is better than ever. The sculptures, videos, photographs and one whopper of a painting by nine artists deliver a satisfying mixture of ambition and accomplishment. In nearly all the pieces, these qualities play off each other in ways that make for lively exchanges and leave plenty of room for viewer participation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
Philadelphia-born Edward Biberman was a Modernist painter through and through. From his earliest sojourns to Paris and Berlin in 1926 until his 1986 death in Los Angeles, after half a century as an artist and teacher in the city, he tweaked Modernism's familiar fascination with a machine aesthetic. Biberman developed a distinctive Industrial Age point of view. Sometimes it took shape as Social Realist analysis of the costs to human dignity and sometimes as simplified geometric forms of urban landscape.
NEWS
July 18, 2008
'Henry IV' actress: In some copies of today's Calendar section, the review of "Henry IV" at Barnsdall Park gave the wrong first name of Audrey for Aubrey Saverino, who plays Lady Percy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2008 | David Ng
In the Elizabethan era, groundlings paid a penny to occupy a patch of dirt in open-air theaters to see plays such as Shakespeare's. Though many aspects of the experience haven't changed, we do have to contend with parking, helicopter noise and other modern annoyances. TO RESERVE OR NOT TO RESERVE, THAT IS THE QUESTION Many theater companies allow you to make reservations, even if tickets are free. It's a good idea to secure your spot in advance, especially if you're going in a group, because seats can fill quickly.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
The Junior Arts Center at Barnsdall Art Park begins its fall storytelling series today with a program of "Stories From Many Lands." The storyteller is Alecia Grebner, a 15-year-old Angeleno, who is fast making a name for herself in the storytelling world. A natural performer who lives with her mother and grandmother, Alecia learned many of her stories from them. Others she researches in bookstores and libraries while maintaining an A average at a Los Angeles high school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Ludlow Flower Jr., who presided over the Los Angeles Recreation and Park Commission during the expansionist 1960s and pushed for such projects as the Los Angeles Zoo and the children's art center in Barnsdall Park, has died. He was 89. Flower died Feb. 25 from complications related to old age at his home in Glendale, according to his family. "Of his civic accomplishments, he was most proud of the zoo -- that was a really big deal," said Cynthia Schield, one of his daughters.
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