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Barry Goldwater

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1997 | ROSS K. BAKER, Ross K. Baker is a professor of political science at Rutgers University whose specialty is Congress
The unprecedented public campaign by former Massachusetts governor William Weld to gain confirmation--or at least a hearing by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee--for his nomination to be ambassador to Mexico often appears to be nothing more than a face-off between two men who hate each other's guts, a schoolyard squabble between a kid with a lace collar and a neighborhood tough.
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NEWS
September 24, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater has been released from the hospital where he was treated for a mild stroke, said Robin Cook of St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix. Goldwater went home Saturday, Cook said, but his family had requested that his release not be made public. Goldwater, 87, the Republican candidate for president in 1964, was admitted about two weeks ago after the stroke was discovered during routine testing. He did not suffer any paralysis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1996
Re Perspectives on HIV in the Military, by Robert Dornan and Barry Goldwater, Commentary, March 19: Is there a different Republican Party that Goldwater belongs to? Or has he just been asleep for 16 years? Come on, Barry. After President Reagan waited until 20,000 U.S. citizens had died of HIV before he publicly said the word "AIDS," don't act as if Dornan's position is something new or extreme. He, at least, is consistent with the position the Republicans have given us since 1980.
NEWS
July 2, 1995 | WALTER R. MEARS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
From the vantage of his house above the city, and of his 86 years, Barry Goldwater looks over the valley and talks political heresy: given the right presidential candidate, he might just turn into a Democrat. And the "right" candidate isn't the one he's endorsed. It's Colin Powell, retired chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, who hasn't said which party he'd run in, should he decide to enter the 1996 campaign.
NEWS
May 6, 1995 | Reuters
Former Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater, who pioneered the modern Republican conservative movement, on Friday endorsed the presidential bid of Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.). Goldwater, whose own Republican presidential run in 1964 ended in defeat at the hands of President Lyndon B. Johnson, gave his endorsement after a series of telephone conversations, Dole's campaign office said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1993
In response to "Ban on Gays Is a Senseless Attempt to Stall the Inevitable," Commentary, June 11: Once again, Barry Goldwater has, with his wonderfully pithy language, cut through to the core of an issue. Hard-liners cried doom when blacks were integrated, the same with women. The armed forces have survived and are enriched by their contributions. The same will happen when gays are integrated. Goldwater goes on to challenge the self-styled conservatives who rail against governmental interference in their business dealings but do an about-face and encourage it in others' personal lives.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | Associated Press
Former Sen. Barry Goldwater declared Thursday that the military should lift its ban on gays because "you don't need to be straight to fight and die for your country. You just need to shoot straight." He said study after study had proved that homosexuals are not security risks and said the current debate is a waste of time because the ban ultimately would be lifted, just like prior bans on blacks and women in the military.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | From Reuters
Former Sen. Barry Goldwater, the father of modern conservatism and a Republican elder statesman, said Thursday that his party's strict anti-abortion stance threatens to leave the GOP in shambles. In a letter made public in the U.S. capital Thursday, Goldwater said in referring to President Bush: "If an attempt is made to include his position in the platform, my prophecy is the convention will go down in a shambles, as will the election.
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