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Barry London

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Being blind accounts for Helen Harris' unusual vision for the movie industry. In her mind, she sees thousands of other sightless people sitting in theaters, enjoying the latest films by listening to a running account of the on-screen action through headphones. That explains why two stars from the 1948 movie classic "Little Women" were back on the old MGM lot in Culver City on Wednesday dubbing a new soundtrack for the 1994 remake of the Louisa May Alcott story.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1992 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fending off an assault by two insurgents, "Batman Returns" was expected to hold onto its first-place box office position over the Fourth of July weekend, edging out new releases, "A League of Their Own" and "Boomerang," and doing an estimated $14.6 million business nationwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harrison Ford and the espionage thriller "Patriot Games" powered box-office grosses to a fourth consecutive big weekend, and some film industry observers predict that this summer may equal or actually exceed the record summer of 1989, when the original "Batman" was released. "Patriot Games" provided the audience for action movies with a fresh attraction in a market that has been dominated lately by "Lethal Weapon 3" and, to a lesser extent, "Alien 3," both of which have peaked at the box office.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1995 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Congo," the adaptation of Michael Crichton's gorilla novel from Paramount, surprised industry naysayers and kicked the early summer box office into overdrive with a chest-pounding first weekend estimate of $25.2 million. The movie pawed its way past overwhelmingly negative reviews, apparently luring every available young male (12- to 25-year-olds) as well as strong inner-city attendance, for the best debut numbers since "Interview With the Vampire" last November.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1990 | PAT H. BROESKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francis Coppola's "The Godfather Part III" opened Tuesday with an all-time Christmas Day record. The long-awaited sequel had ticket sales of approximately $6.3 million on 1,800 screens, for a per-screen-average of $3,461. At press time, based on the film's single-day performance, it tied for third place in the top 10. Ticket sales of $6.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scene: While her well-known mentor Steven Spielberg is usually the one on the receiving end of tributes, tables were turned when Steven Spielberg presented producer Kathleen Kennedy--as in "E.T.," "The Color Purple," "Back to the Future" I, II and III, "Jurassic Park," and "Schindler's List"--with the Big Sisters Guild of Los Angeles Sterling Award on Friday night at the Beverly Hilton. No one doubted the 41-year-old powerhouse would make an inspiring role model.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Could it be that being middle-aged and female has become a Hollywood box-office asset? Judging from the runaway success of Paramount's "The First Wives Club"--which shattered box-office doldrums this weekend by taking in a record-breaking $18.9 million--things may be turning around for a demographic that has been noticeably absent from the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1986 | DAVID T. FRIENDLY, Times Staff Writer
The newly appointed vice president of production at a major studio was feeling his oats. The promotion had elevated his confidence, and one of his first calls was to a veteran agent at the William Morris Agency to ask for a private meeting with a top movie star. Informed that the star would not meet with him, the exasperated VP railed, "Don't VP stripes count for anything any more?" The agent responded quickly and definitively: "No." He may be right.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1993 | JEFFREY WELLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not unusual when audiences embrace a film that's been critically trashed, but the case of Paramount Pictures' "Indecent Proposal" is one of notable extremes. A good number of critics really hated it, their knives drawn and razor-sharp. But the public really liked it--or at least went to see it in droves to the tune of $18.3 million over the Friday-to-Sunday weekend. The amount was the biggest for any opening weekend so far this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1994 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It was a marketing department's dream," New Line Cinema's marketing boss Mitchell Goldman said Sunday as he projected a No. 1 finish and a huge $23.5-million opening weekend box-office tally for his company's comedy-action release, "The Mask." "I mean, look what we had to work with: Jim Carrey, hot off his 'Ace Ventura' smash-hit film, and special effects by ILM (Industrial Light & Magic)."
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