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NEWS
March 6, 1996 | GREGG ZOROYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is no trick to spot the warrior in Barry McCaffrey, even as the nation's new drug czar meets reporters in his blue suit and black wingtips just after turning civilian for the first time since he was 17. The quick giveaways are his close-cropped gray hair, GI bearing and West Point ring, class of '64. Less obvious is a left arm decimated by machine-gun fire decades ago and rendered nearly useless, except for dexterity in his finger and thumb.
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OPINION
August 25, 2010
This commentary was written by Gil Kerlikowske, John Walters, Barry McCaffrey, Lee Brown, Bob Martinez and William Bennett, directors of the Office of National Drug Control Policy in the administrations of Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush. Californians will face an important decision in November when they vote on whether to legalize marijuana. Proponents of Proposition 19, the Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act of 2010, rely on two main arguments: that legalizing and taxing marijuana would generate much-needed revenue, and that legalization would allow law enforcement to focus on other crimes.
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OPINION
August 25, 2010
This commentary was written by Gil Kerlikowske, John Walters, Barry McCaffrey, Lee Brown, Bob Martinez and William Bennett, directors of the Office of National Drug Control Policy in the administrations of Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush. Californians will face an important decision in November when they vote on whether to legalize marijuana. Proponents of Proposition 19, the Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act of 2010, rely on two main arguments: that legalizing and taxing marijuana would generate much-needed revenue, and that legalization would allow law enforcement to focus on other crimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2001
As a retired drug enforcement agent and a member of the Writers Guild of America, I couldn't resist responding to "Hollywood Is Ignoring a Valid Drug War Script" (Commentary, March 15). The reason Robert Housman and Barry McCaffrey had a chance to make their arguments in your paper is in part because of Hollywood and films like "Traffic." Many current and former DEA agents eagerly embraced and worked on "Traffic." The DEA and U.S. Customs also assisted the filmmakers. Why? Because these committed drug war veterans know that law enforcement alone cannot solve the fundamental problems that turn people to drugs.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate, by voice vote, approved Army Gen. Barry McCaffrey, 53, to head the Office of National Drug Control Policy. He has been commander in chief of the U.S. Southern Command in Panama for the past two years. At McCaffrey's confirmation hearing, Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah), chairman of the Judiciary Committee, criticized President Clinton's antidrug policies while lauding the general.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1996
Re "Drug Czar Warns Doctors That U.S. Would Prosecute," Oct. 30: Barry McCaffrey's threat to prosecute physicians who prescribe marijuana if Prop. 215 is approved by California voters is a chilling reminder that the roots of the drug war go back 82 years and started with federal prosecution of physicians for prescribing drugs. A bit of history that I doubt the general is familiar with: The Harrison Narcotic Act was passed by Congress in December 1914. It was supposed to be a taxation and regulatory act for keeping track of opium and coca products.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1998
Re "Ad Plan: Your Tax Dollars on Drugs," Aug. 20: Let me try to understand what the genius powers have concocted now. It seems that they are giving $1 billion to the coffers of advertising agencies, television networks, the print media, producers and talent agencies. In return, this needy group will proffer new exciting ways to tell us all that drugs are still bad. Hmm. Did I vote for this? Let's try a simple mathematical equation for [drug czar] Barry McCaffrey and company: $1 billion divided by a $12,500 annual college tuition equals 80,000 students.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
White House anti-drug czar Barry McCaffrey on Monday predicted heavy fighting in an approaching U.S.-backed anti-drug offensive and warned that there would be repercussions for Colombia's neighbors. But with "vital" U.S. interests at stake, and insurgents growing stronger through deepening ties to the drug trade, McCaffrey said he saw no alternative to the $1.3-billion effort set to get underway in January. "Colombia has no option.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1999
Re "Pot Has Uses as Medicine, U.S. Panel Says," March 18: Now that the study of marijuana commissioned by Barry McCaffrey, our own federal drug czar, is released, perhaps we can have an adult dialogue about the medical applications of marijuana for people who can benefit from its use. Since the report does indeed indicate it has benefits for certain diseases, we should allow research to move forward so that it can be applied in the proper cases...
OPINION
July 16, 2000
Re "Coming to a Theater . . . ," editorial, July 12: Will our exorbitantly expensive, counterproductive war on drugs never end? Will there ever exist any politician possessing the ethics, conscience and courage to proclaim it for what it is--a political soapbox? Our noble "drug czar," Barry McCaffrey, continues to concoct ever-more-asinine schemes. Also not acknowledged: This interminable, unwinnable war strengthens that which it seeks to destroy. The endless preaching and sloganeering serve to generate desire for that which is forbidden, creating an "us against them" camaraderie, especially among the disenfranchised.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
White House anti-drug czar Barry McCaffrey on Monday predicted heavy fighting in an approaching U.S.-backed anti-drug offensive and warned that there would be repercussions for Colombia's neighbors. But with "vital" U.S. interests at stake, and insurgents growing stronger through deepening ties to the drug trade, McCaffrey said he saw no alternative to the $1.3-billion effort set to get underway in January. "Colombia has no option.
SPORTS
October 17, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barry McCaffrey, who announced Monday that he intends to step down Jan. 6 as the U.S. government's so-called drug czar, has used the post to press for curbs on the use of drugs in sports--particularly Olympic sports.
OPINION
July 16, 2000
Re "Coming to a Theater . . . ," editorial, July 12: Will our exorbitantly expensive, counterproductive war on drugs never end? Will there ever exist any politician possessing the ethics, conscience and courage to proclaim it for what it is--a political soapbox? Our noble "drug czar," Barry McCaffrey, continues to concoct ever-more-asinine schemes. Also not acknowledged: This interminable, unwinnable war strengthens that which it seeks to destroy. The endless preaching and sloganeering serve to generate desire for that which is forbidden, creating an "us against them" camaraderie, especially among the disenfranchised.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2000
I agree with Robert Scheer's Jan. 20 column about the drug czar's review of TV programming. Barry McCaffrey's government office has no business censoring or approving any program, entertainment or otherwise. I demand a notice on every TV program subject to Czar McCaffrey's censorship: WARNING--this program censored by Czar McCaffrey's Federal Office of National Drug Control Policy. DAVID CLARK Irvine I wrote one of the so-called government-exploited scripts ("The Smart Guy," "Never Too Young")
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television generally does a far better job than movies and music when it comes to responsible depictions of drug, tobacco and alcohol use, according to a study commissioned by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1999
Although sharing your frustration at the hypocritical lack of consistency in drug czar Barry R. McCaffrey's dualistic approach to alcohol and drugs (editorial, June 16), I think that you will find that his schismatic approach is mirrored by society. How about some of that billion dollars being spent to educate a confused population? As it says in the literature of one of the prominent 12-step fellowships, Narcotics Anonymous, "Alcohol is a drug. We cannot afford to be confused about this."
NEWS
July 22, 1997 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno and federal drug czar Barry McCaffrey have recommended sharply reducing the gap between mandatory federal prison sentences for possession of crack cocaine, heavily used by black offenders, and powder cocaine, popular among whites, administration officials said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1999
Federal drug czar Barry R. McCaffrey has launched a $1-billion media campaign to dissuade youngsters from substance abuse. Not a penny, however, will address the substance that today's teenagers are abusing the most: alcohol. With youth consumption on the rise since the early 1990s, even McCaffrey acknowledges that alcohol leads to more teenage deaths than other drugs combined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1999
Federal drug czar Barry R. McCaffrey has launched a $1-billion media campaign to dissuade youngsters from substance abuse. Not a penny, however, will address the substance that today's teenagers are abusing the most: alcohol. With youth consumption on the rise since the early 1990s, even McCaffrey acknowledges that alcohol leads to more teenage deaths than other drugs combined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1999
Re "Pot Has Uses as Medicine, U.S. Panel Says," March 18: Now that the study of marijuana commissioned by Barry McCaffrey, our own federal drug czar, is released, perhaps we can have an adult dialogue about the medical applications of marijuana for people who can benefit from its use. Since the report does indeed indicate it has benefits for certain diseases, we should allow research to move forward so that it can be applied in the proper cases...
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