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Barry Minkow

BUSINESS
August 7, 1994
"In the Shadow of the '80s" (July 31) can easily lead to a harmful misconception of the teachings of the Jewish faith. Such phrases as " . . . he has renounced crime and found Jesus" and "he's banking on his dramatic conversion from Judaism to make a comeback" suggest that somehow crime and Judaism go together and that only by renouncing his faith through a "dramatic" conversion could he start a crime-free life. Neither Judaism nor its daughter religion, Christianity, teaches or countenances wickedness.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1988
A business associate of ZZZZ Best founder Barry Minkow pleaded guilty Wednesday to stock fraud and admitted helping the whiz kid entrepreneur launder funds stolen from the Reseda carpet-cleaning company. Jerry Polevoi, 41, of Woodland Hills, was the eighth man to plead guilty in a securities fraud case stemming from the July, 1987, collapse of ZZZZ Best. Minkow, 22, and three other men face trial Aug.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1987 | DANIEL AKST, Times Staff Writer
James D. Richman said he charged $100 worth of carpet cleaning while living in Santa Monica, but he got billed for $1,790 on his Visa card statement. Barbara Lee of Westminster paid by check but wrote her Visa number on top. Sure enough, she said, her Visa card was billed for more than $1,600. Then there was Lucille Frost of Santa Ana. She was slapped with $1,389.50 in Visa charges and $1,710.57 in Mastercard charges--all for $75 worth of carpet cleaning. What do these people have in common?
NEWS
February 21, 1988 | RONALD L. SOBLE
The stack of documents filed with a congressional committee by Los Angeles police deals another blow to the carefully cultivated image of Barry Minkow, founder of the ZZZZ Best carpet cleaning company. Minkow, 21, promoted himself as an all-American figure--the handsome, muscular "Rocky of rug cleaning" who eschewed liquor and drugs. He insisted on drug tests for his employees and donated tens of thousands of dollars to anti-drug programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1988
After 50 days of testimony in a Los Angeles federal courtroom, the questioning of witnesses concluded Friday in the trial of Barry Minkow, the one-time millionaire whiz kid who is accused in a 57-count indictment of staging an elaborate securities hoax through his ZZZZ Best carpet cleaning company. Closing arguments by the prosecutor and Minkow's defense attorney are scheduled Tuesday. The jury was expected to receive its instructions from U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1988
Federal prosecutors have filed a list of additional accusations against one-time carpet-cleaning whiz kid Barry Minkow, who faces trial this month on nearly 50 fraud, money-laundering and other charges. Minkow, charged with using his Reseda-based ZZZZ Best carpet-cleaning company to fraudulently obtain millions of dollars, also committed 11 additional acts for which he has not been charged, prosecutors allege.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1986 | From Associated Press
A 20-year-old man who said his housecleaning business has made him a millionaire presented a $10,000 check Monday to Narconon, a Los Angeles drug rehabilitation program. Barry Minkow, owner of ZZZZ Best Inc., said the money will be used to help rehabilitate drug users who otherwise could not afford treatment. "I make things happen," said Minkow, who started his Reseda-based company while he was in the 10th grade at Cleveland High School and "too young to open a bank account."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Federal prosecutors have filed a list of additional accusations against former carpet-cleaning whiz kid Barry Minkow, who already faces trial this month on nearly 50 charges, including fraud and money laundering. Minkow, charged in connection with the failure of his Reseda-based ZZZZ Best carpet-cleaning company, which prosecutors allege was a giant pyramid-scheme fraud, also committed 11 additional acts for which he has not been charged, according to documents filed by prosecutors.
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