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Barry Rosen

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NEWS
August 1, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Barry Rosen, the decision was his toughest in nearly 20 years. Should he come face to face with a man who held him and 51 other Americans hostage in Iran for 444 agonizing days as mobs chanted "Death to America!" outside? Rosen, former press officer--and captive--at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, decided that it was time. For two hours Friday, he shared a speaker's platform with Abbas Abdi, onetime Iranian revolutionary student leader and a mastermind of the 1979 embassy takeover.
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NEWS
August 1, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Barry Rosen, the decision was his toughest in nearly 20 years. Should he come face to face with a man who held him and 51 other Americans hostage in Iran for 444 agonizing days as mobs chanted "Death to America!" outside? Rosen, former press officer--and captive--at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, decided that it was time. For two hours Friday, he shared a speaker's platform with Abbas Abdi, onetime Iranian revolutionary student leader and a mastermind of the 1979 embassy takeover.
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NEWS
June 14, 1991 | From Associated Press
Eight Americans who were held hostage in Iran demanded Thursday that Congress investigate allegations that the Reagan-Bush campaign delayed their release in 1980. "The question of whether there is evidence of wrongdoing must be answered by an unbiased, bipartisan congressional investigation with full subpoena power," the former hostages said in a letter to lawmakers. "Unless this happens, speculation and unanswered questions will erode public confidence in our electoral system," they said.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2013 | By Tina Susman, This post has been corrected. See note below.
Cathleen Alexis, the mother of Aaron Alexis, who shot to death 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard before being killed by police, apologized to the victims' families Wednesday as she spoke out for the first time since theĀ  rampage in the nation's capital: "Our son Aaron Alexis has murdered 12 people and wounded several others," she said. "His actions have had a profound and everlasting effect on the family of the victims. I don't know why he did what he did, and I will never be able to ask him why. Aaron is now in a place where he can no longer do harm to anyone, and for that I am glad.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1994 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Candy has one truly funny moment in "Wagons East!," the Western comedy that had nearly finished shooting when he died suddenly early this year. As the reluctant wagonmaster James Harlow, he turns back to the barful of eager-for-exodus townsfolk who're counting on him and proclaims, "We leave at dawn." The cloud of a second thought passes over his face, then a shrug: ". . . Noonish," he wavers.
SPORTS
February 9, 2001 | LARRY STEWART
What: "Do You Believe in Miracles? The Story of the 1980 U.S. Hockey Team" Where: HBO, Saturday, 11:30 a.m. You don't have to be a hockey fan, or even a sports fan, to appreciate this excellent one-hour documentary about the team that produced one of the great moments in sports. This is more than just a sports documentary. It's also a period piece, touching on the Iranian hostage situation, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the U.S.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2003 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
The problem is one of the most difficult facing education: how to rebuild Afghanistan's shattered school system after isolation under Taliban rule and 23 years of war. More than 100,000 teachers fled the country. Computers and the Internet are unfamiliar to vitally needed personnel. Many school buildings are in ruins. In some cases, classes are held in fields where students sit on mats. Despite these hardships, Education Ministry officials expect 5.
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 300 Muslims marched in a procession in Los Angeles on Sunday to express their grief over the death of the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini but thousands more gathered later in Westwood rally to celebrate the passing of the impassioned religious and political leader of Iran. "We are very sad and sorrowful," said Mohammed Hassani, a USC student leading the pro-Khomeini ceremony. Hassani carried one of several ribbon-draped portraits of the imam and, with the crowd, chanted, "Long live the Islamic movement."
WORLD
September 8, 2006 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Former Iranian President Mohammad Khatami, undertaking an American tour rare for ex-officials of the government in Tehran, called Thursday for a "dialogue of civilizations" among Jews, Christians and Muslims, even as he scolded the Bush administration for its treatment of detainees and other alleged human rights abuses. "I do not deny that there are a lot of problems in Iran.
TRAVEL
November 2, 1997 | EILEEN OGINTZ
Rod Kramer only agreed to take the lessons to please his teenage son. He never figured on having so much fun. "I hated [the idea of] snowboarding. I'm a skier," the Colorado resident explained. "But we learned to snowboard together, falling down and laughing and feeling inept. I had a ball." That was two winters ago. Kramer and his 16-year-old son Andrew have since become committed and accomplished snow-boarders. The best part, they agree, is sharing that learning curve.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
So there's this great place for sale. Big, sturdy, dynamic. Prime location, on the edge of the Loop financial district. The view, on a clear day, spectacular. It's got 110 floors, 76,000 tons of steel framework, 109 elevators and--start hoarding the Windex--16,000 bronze-tinted panes of glass. Interested? The owner reportedly wants a cool $1 billion, maybe $1.2 billion, the biggest price tag ever on a single building. But, then again, they don't make them like this any more. And with good reason.
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