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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Walter C. Righter, a retired Episcopal bishop of Iowa who was absolved of heresy charges after ordaining a non-celibate gay man as a deacon in 1990, died Sunday at his home outside Pittsburgh after a long illness. He was 87. His death was confirmed by Rich Creehan, a spokesman for the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh, where Righter was ordained 60 years ago. Righter became a lightning rod for dissent over the ordination of gays in the Episcopal Church when he was an assistant bishop in Newark, N.J., under Bishop John Spong, an outspoken supporter of ordaining lesbians and gays.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Walter C. Righter, a retired Episcopal bishop of Iowa who was absolved of heresy charges after ordaining a non-celibate gay man as a deacon in 1990, died Sunday at his home outside Pittsburgh after a long illness. He was 87. His death was confirmed by Rich Creehan, a spokesman for the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh, where Righter was ordained 60 years ago. Righter became a lightning rod for dissent over the ordination of gays in the Episcopal Church when he was an assistant bishop in Newark, N.J., under Bishop John Spong, an outspoken supporter of ordaining lesbians and gays.
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MAGAZINE
February 25, 1996 | Mary Rourke, Mary Rourke writes about religion for The Times
Grace Cathedral seems like a vast and regal ark on this January afternoon. San Francisco's winter light sheds gold across the several hundred visitors who stand near the massive double doors, bolted shut. Two bishops of the Episcopalian church--one carrying a shepherd's staff, the other dressed in the flame color stole of his office--wait expectantly. The dense scent of beeswax candles fills the air as the choir rings Renaissance hand bells.
MAGAZINE
February 25, 1996 | Mary Rourke, Mary Rourke writes about religion for The Times
Grace Cathedral seems like a vast and regal ark on this January afternoon. San Francisco's winter light sheds gold across the several hundred visitors who stand near the massive double doors, bolted shut. Two bishops of the Episcopalian church--one carrying a shepherd's staff, the other dressed in the flame color stole of his office--wait expectantly. The dense scent of beeswax candles fills the air as the choir rings Renaissance hand bells.
NEWS
February 29, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judicial body of the Episcopal Church began deliberations in Wilmington, Del., to determine if a retired bishop should be tried as a heretic for ordaining a gay man as a deacon. Retired Bishop Walter Righter, 72, faces a heresy trial in May if the court of nine bishops decides that gays cannot be ordained as deacons and priests under church law. Righter ordained the Rev. Barry Stopfel, who is gay, as deacon of the church in New Jersey in 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1999 | Associated Press
A conservative Episcopal faction that used the church's name to promote its agenda on the Internet has agreed to stop the practice after a lawsuit was filed by liberal bishops. Under a deal approved earlier this month by U.S. District Judge Maryanne Trump Barry, Bishop William C. Wantland of Wisconsin agreed to stop using the name of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America--and its acronym. In return, the New Jersey bishops agreed to drop claims for damages.
NEWS
May 29, 1996 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Charging that the Episcopal Church is beset by moral confusion, 10 conservative bishops vowed Tuesday to take their fight against the ordination of non-celibate gays and the blessing of same-sex unions to the church's highest policy-making body. They also served notice that they will form a new "fellowship" within the church to minister to parishes whose bishops fail to uphold traditional church teachings on sexual morality. However, the 10 prelates left the 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1996
A historic ruling by an Episcopal Church court dismissing heresy charges against retired Bishop Walter C. Righter for ordaining a non-celibate gay man will not be appealed by the 10 bishops who brought the charges against him. Instead, they said this week that they will resume their fight against the ordination of non-celibate gays and lesbians when the church's highest policymaking body, the General Convention, meets next year in Philadelphia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1996 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Charging that the Episcopal Church is beset by moral confusion, 10 conservative bishops plan to take their fight against the ordination of non-celibate gays and the blessing of same-sex unions to the church's highest policymaking body. The bishops also announced this week that they will form a new "fellowship" within the church to minister to parishes whose bishops fail to uphold traditional church teachings on sexual morality. However, the prelates left the 2.
MAGAZINE
March 31, 1996
Mary Rourke writes about the "Episcopalian Church," by which she means the Episcopal Church ("The Heretic" Feb. 25). Episcopalians are members of that church. Its bishops wear purple, not red. A "flame-colored stole is not a symbol of the bishop's office but rather of the deacon's office. If the stole is flame-colored, it is so because of the season of the church year. At other times, it might be green, purple or white. Bishops wear not a special "bishop's collar" but a regular clerical collar.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In a move that is certain to escalate tension within Christian churches over gays in the clergy, an Episcopal bishop will face a trial in a rare church court for ordaining a gay man five years ago. The stunning announcement Friday from Episcopal Church headquarters in New York that retired Bishop Walter C. Righter, 71, of Iowa would be tried by a panel of nine bishops came after months of attempts by Presiding Bishop and Primate Edmond L. Browning to settle the controversy out of court.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1999 | SCARLET CHENG, Scarlet Cheng is an occasional contributor to Calendar
In a world awash in the wages of sin, we find ourselves not only forgiving the sinner but also redefining the sin. "The Presentment," D. Paul Thomas' new play premiering today at the Pasadena Playhouse, is about the sin-we-dared-not-talk-about--at least until this decade, when homosexuality was brought into our living rooms as sitcom material and rendered nearly banal. It is also the story of a family in crisis, a forte of American drama.
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