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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2005 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
It was one of the most baffling mysteries of the World War II era. How did convicted war criminal Hermann Goering manage to poison himself as U.S. soldiers prepared to hang him? A dozen competing theories have swirled for nearly half a century about how the onetime Nazi second in command was able to commit suicide despite around-the-clock surveillance of his military prison cell.
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SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By James Barragan
The NCAA and its member institutions often refer to "student-athletes," but the front side of the term isn't often highlighted in a sports section. We asked officials from the Southland's Division I universities to point us toward their best and brightest - the teams that made classroom performance a priority. Here is what we found at Northridge: Above the desk on the left side of his office is an acknowledgment of what Marcelo Leonardi considers to be his proudest accomplishment as Cal State Northridge's women's water polo coach.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | MIMI KO
Owners of the Leaky Tiki bar accused the City Council last week of racism in revoking their entertainment permit. "We will fight this in court," said Janet Escobosa, an owner of the bar. "Until three months ago, I ran the only Mexican bar in La Habra where you can listen to Mexican music and speak Spanish. (The City Council) is discriminating against us."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday appointed as head of California's political ethics agency a judge who has overseen the discipline of attorneys. Jodi Remke, presiding judge of the State Bar Court of California, is Brown's choice for chairwoman of the state Fair Political Practices Commission. Her appointment fills a void created six months ago when Chairwoman Ann Ravel moved to the Federal Elections Commission. Good-government activists including Robert Stern, a former general counsel for the California agency and a coauthor of the state Political Reform Act, said they knew nothing about Remke.
FOOD
April 15, 2009 | Noelle Carter
Dear SOS: Julienne's bakery in San Marino has delicious graham cracker chewy bars dusted with powdered sugar. Can you get the recipe? Robi Inserra Los Angeles Dear Robi: These delicious little bars combine a dense graham cracker base with a velvety custard filling rich with brown sugar and chopped pecans. Sweet, but not overly so, each bar is like a perfect miniature pecan pie baked over a wonderfully crumbly graham cracker crust. Plan ahead and make an extra batch.
FOOD
August 26, 2010
  Aspen power bars Total time: 35 minutes Servings: 12 to 16 Note: Adapted from chef Pam Davis of the Colorado Cook for America Culinary Boot Camps 1 1/2 cups plus 2 tablespoons (5 1/4 ounces) old-fashioned rolled oats 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons (3 1/4 ounces) light brown sugar Heaping 1/2 cup (2 ounces) unsweetened coconut flakes 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 3/4 cup (4 ounces) nuts or sunflower seeds 3/4 cup powdered milk 1/2 cup (2 ounces)
FOOD
March 23, 2013
  Total time: 1 hour, 20 minutes, plus cooling time Servings: 16 bars Note: You can substitute ½ cup chocolate chips for the chocolate chunks. If making the bars ahead, store them in an airtight container at room temperature. 1/4 cup finely diced dried apricots (about 1.5 ounces or 6 apricots) 1/4 cup finely diced dried figs (about 1.5 ounces or 2½ large figs) 1 tablespoon sweet red wine 1/2 cup matzo cake meal (about 2 ounces) 1/4 cup potato starch (about 1.2 ounces)
NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
We've been checking out the many energy and snack bars on the market, and it seems there are plenty of choices for people who need or want to avoid gluten. Some of them announce it on the front of the label; others require closer reading of the nutrition information. For people who don't eat gluten by choice, there are lots of bars that don't include wheat, rye or barley as an ingredient but warn the bars are made in facilities that might house those products. That's important information for people with celiac disease -- even a small bit of gluten can make them sick.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011 | By Matt Donnelly, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Celebrities spend a lot of time in bars and restaurants, and many of them seem compelled to eventually own one. Drawing a crowd is certainly easier with a big name attached, but why would a famous actor or musician want the hassle? Tax write-off? Vanity project? Most likely, hospitality is in the DNA of any great entertainer. "For people in the industry, a big part of the draw is working with creative minds, so an obvious perk is enjoying that off the clock. Think back to the Rat Pack — the idea of powerhouses in a protected space at a table for drinks and great food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
If Los Angeles ever wants to join the ranks of Las Vegas or Miami in attracting tourists who want to party, it needs to free its night spots from having to make the last call for alcohol by 2 a.m., according to one state lawmaker. State Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) has introduced legislation that would allow California cities to seek permission from the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to allow their nightclubs, restauraunts and bars to sell drinks until 4 a.m. "Many cities in California have dynamic social activities that are vital to their economies, but they lack the flexibility to expand their businesses,” Leno said.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Richard Simon
In Georgia, it will soon be legal to carry a gun in more places -- including bars, churches and government buildings -- following Gov. Nathan Deal's signing Wednesday of a bill celebrated by supporters as a victory for the 2nd Amendment but decried by critics as the "guns-everywhere bill. "  "We Georgians believe in the right of people to defend themselves, and we believe in the 2nd Amendment," Deal said. The measure drew national attention because of its sweep and its passage after a number of high-profile shootings around the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO--A bill barring the state's health insurance exchange from hiring individuals convicted of certain felonies failed to advance Tuesday. Under the proposal by Assemblywoman Connie Conway (R-Tulare), Covered California would not be able to hire people who have been convicted of certain crimes--felonies concerning breach of trust or dishonesty--for jobs where enrollees' financial or medical data could be accessed.  Conway, the Assembly Republican Leader, argued that by hiring people convicted of financial crimes, the health plan exchange could be putting users' private information at risk.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
You'd think giving away books would be an easy thing to do, but Melissa Eggerling tries to put a lot of creativity and a bit of theater into the act. On Wednesday, Eggerling will be one of 800 Southern Californians participating as "givers" in World Book Night, a program designed to distribute free books to people who might not read them otherwise. Last year Eggerling and her two young sons took boxes filled with the novel "Fahrenheit 451" and distributed them from a Los Angeles city fire truck in Eagle Rock.
NATIONAL
April 15, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court next week will consider for the first time whether states may enforce laws that make it a crime to knowingly publish false statements about political candidates. The justices will hear an antiabortion group's free-speech challenge to an Ohio law that was invoked in 2010 by then-Rep. Steve Driehaus, a Democrat. He had voted for President Obama's healthcare law and was facing a tough race for reelection. The antiabortion group Susan B. Anthony List launched a campaign to unseat Driehaus, preparing to run billboard ads saying, "Shame on Steve Driehaus!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Only a fool would second-guess the transformative power of Audra McDonald, but when it was announced that this five-time Tony Award-winner was going to portray Billie Holiday in the Broadway production of “Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill,” I must confess that I had my qualms. When one recalls Holiday's sublimely ruined sound at the end of her career, the period in which Lanie Robertson's concert drama is set, one doesn't think of McDonald's soaring, Juilliard-burnished soprano, a gold medal voice still in its athletic prime.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Saturday night is fight night, with the highly anticipated rematch between Manny Pacquiao and Timothy Bradley set to be broadcast on big screens across the nation. As thousands of fans traipse into bars and restaurants to catch the big fight, a small army of corporate detectives will be lurking in the background, hoping to catch something else. Paid by the promoters of the closed-circuit televised event, these sleuths will be on the lookout for bar owners who show the Pacquiao-Bradley fight without paying the commercial rate, which dwarfs the fee to watch in your living room.
FOOD
December 15, 2011
"I found this recipe many years ago on the back of a bag of prunes. I tried it and I realized after the first batch that they were irresistible. But then we moved and the recipe got lost in the shuffle. I went 20 years without being able to make them. I wrote to the prune company, I searched the Internet, I couldn't find them. Then one day I was going through a box of old family photos and there they were. It was like a family reunion. " - Ronna Ballister, Altadena Sweet tart oat nut bars Total time: 1 hour, 10 minutes, plus cooling time for the bars Servings: Makes about 4 dozen bars.
OPINION
April 10, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Christopher Hubbart has had a hard time trying to find a place to live, and no wonder. He's a serial rapist who assaulted women in the 1970s and '80s, was convicted and released, only to rape again. He was committed indefinitely to a mental facility until such time as he was determined by authorities to no longer be a threat. There was such a determination last summer, and it was upheld by a California court, but Hubbart waited while officials hunted for a place in Los Angeles County where he could live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By David Zahniser
A veteran Los Angeles building inspector sentenced last month to prison in an FBI corruption case will continue to receive a yearly pension of more than $72,000, according to a high-level retirement official. Samuel In, 66, pleaded guilty last year, admitting as part of a plea agreement that he took more than $30,000 in bribes while working as a senior inspector. He was sentenced last month to 2 1/2 years in prison after a federal prosecutor argued against leniency, mentioning his "substantial" pension.
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