Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBartolome De Las Casas
IN THE NEWS

Bartolome De Las Casas

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
October 11, 1992 | TOM BATES, Tom Bates is the author of "Rads: A True Story of the '60s," to be published in November by HarperCollins. He is also a former senior editor of this magazine.
IT WAS THE LAST DAY OF A WEEKEND CONFERENCE ON THE INCAS AND THE HEAVIES were on their way down from New York. As Columbus scholars and social justice advocates streamed into Princeton's Betts Auditorium, the soft, spring air held an edge of anticipation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
MAGAZINE
October 11, 1992 | TOM BATES, Tom Bates is the author of "Rads: A True Story of the '60s," to be published in November by HarperCollins. He is also a former senior editor of this magazine.
IT WAS THE LAST DAY OF A WEEKEND CONFERENCE ON THE INCAS AND THE HEAVIES were on their way down from New York. As Columbus scholars and social justice advocates streamed into Princeton's Betts Auditorium, the soft, spring air held an edge of anticipation.
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
November 15, 1992
I share Helen Rand Parish's enthusiasm for Bartolome de las Casas ("Sainted Obsession," by Tom Bates, Oct. 11). If canonization by the Vatican is a way for the rest of the world to learn about this hero, then I, as a Protestant--if I could--would cast my vote for sainthood. JENISE COOK Sherman Oaks
WORLD
February 28, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge has sentenced two brothers to 26 years in prison for their participation in the 1997 massacre of 45 men, women and children in Mexico's southern state of Chiapas. Antonio and Mariano Pucuj were also ordered to pay more than $70,000 in compensation to the victims' families, the human rights group Fray Bartolome de las Casas said. Pro-government villagers armed with guns and machetes killed the 45 Tzotzil Indians on Dec. 22, 1997, in an incident known as the Acteal massacre.
NEWS
November 5, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like his predecessor Fray Bartolome de las Casas in 1545, Roman Catholic Bishop Samuel Ruiz came to Chiapas as a conservative young cleric determined to change the ways of the Maya Indians of this poor southern Mexican state. Instead, Ruiz recalled during a festive two-day retirement celebration that ended Thursday, the Indians changed him. During nearly 40 years as head of the diocese of San Cristobal de las Casas, Ruiz became a champion of Maya culture and rights.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1991 | ZAN DUBIN
A weeklong series of lectures, a children's art exhibit and other free events to celebrate the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' first voyage begins today. "Discovery Week," based on the theme of discovery and learning, is coordinated by city of Santa Ana Recreation and Community Services Department, the Santa Ana Public Library, the Santa Ana Unified School District and the Orange County American Italian Renaissance Foundation, which conducts activities relating to Italian history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1985 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Bartolome de las Casas, a hero to liberation theologians for his defense of the American Indians during the Spanish conquest, will be proposed for canonization in the Roman Catholic Church, the Dominican order announced in Berkeley. "Las Casas was the first person to speak out for the rights of Indians in the New World," said Father Antoninus Wall, O.P., president of the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology in Berkeley.
OPINION
May 15, 1994
Virtually all of the photographers whose work is displayed in the Armand Hammer Museum's exhibit "Mexico Through Foreign Eyes"--among them some of the great names in the history of photography--went to Mexico just to visit. One who went to stay is the extraordinary Swedish photographer Gertrude Blom, who devoted half a century to documenting the beauty and defending the rights of the Lacandon Indians of Chiapas.
SCIENCE
January 8, 2005 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
Not long after Christopher Columbus' arrival in the New World, hordes of viciously stinging ants assailed the island of Hispaniola, pouring into homes and ravaging the Spanish colonists' newly planted crops of oranges, pomegranates and cassia trees. People had to place the legs of their beds in containers of water to avoid being covered in ants during the night. Two centuries later, a different plague of ants laid waste sugar plantations in the islands of Martinique, Barbados and Grenada.
NEWS
February 21, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talks aimed at peacefully ending a seven-week Indian uprising are scheduled to begin today in this city's colonial cathedral. One of the four oldest temples in the Americas and once the church of 16th-Century activist for Indian rights Fray Bartolome de las Casas, the site symbolizes the issues that rebels and a government negotiator have agreed to discuss. Centuries of poverty and repression in Chiapas, Mexico's most southern state, are expected to lead the agenda.
NEWS
April 28, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along one edge of the square negotiating table sat ski-masked Maya Indians, half of them in ceremonial regalia of woolen tunics and beribboned straw hats. Facing them across the room were highly trained Mexican technocrats, among them Marco Antonio Bernal, a veteran of government social programs, and prominent diplomat Gustavo Iruegas, experienced in finding common ground for different views.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|