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Barton Myers

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NEWS
May 3, 2001 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about good neighbors. Architect and urban planner Barton Myers, who lives in Montecito, entrusted his professional archive to the nearby University Art Museum at UC Santa Barbara. "It is great that I found a home for it," Myers said from his office in Beverly Hills. "This way you can see 30 years of an architect's work. There are a lot of beautiful drawings." A lot means about 700,000.
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HOME & GARDEN
February 15, 2007 | Morris Newman, Special to The Times
CARMEN ROGERS found her new home almost by accident a couple years ago while flipping through the pages of a magazine at the supermarket checkout line. There it was photographed on a steep hillside in Montecito, the home that architect Barton Myers built for himself and his wife in 1998. Divided into three separate structures, the steel-and-glass house is uncompromisingly industrial in style yet is still in harmony with the unspoiled, oak-filled hillside.
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NEWS
February 11, 1988 | LEON WHITESON
As a young Navy pilot flying over England from a U.S. airfield in the 1950s, Barton Myers began to be excited by his aerial panorama of the spires, domes and towers of such architectural glories as Blenheim Palace and Ely Cathedral. "I happened to live in the guest house of a man named John Crittall, chief of Britain's major window-manufacturing firm," Myers recalled. "He turned me on to architecture and sent me off to audit lectures on architectural history at Cambridge University.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2002 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles architect Barton Myers is better known for designing large public buildings than private houses. He is the brain behind the award-winning Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, completed in 1993--a flexible facility with movable floors and seats, which allows for multiple uses, and reconfiguration from a flat exhibition hall into a 1,850-seat arena or theater with 900, 1,450 or 1,963 seats.
HOME & GARDEN
February 15, 2007 | Morris Newman, Special to The Times
CARMEN ROGERS found her new home almost by accident a couple years ago while flipping through the pages of a magazine at the supermarket checkout line. There it was photographed on a steep hillside in Montecito, the home that architect Barton Myers built for himself and his wife in 1998. Divided into three separate structures, the steel-and-glass house is uncompromisingly industrial in style yet is still in harmony with the unspoiled, oak-filled hillside.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
A Los Angeles design team headed by architect Barton Myers has been selected for the U.S. Pavilion at the World's Fair to be held in Seville, Spain, in 1992. The Myers team selection, announced Friday by the U.S. Information Agency, chooses "a building that will establish an image of America that highlights its vitality and creativity in the field of design and which conveys the spirit of a dynamic society confident of its talents and its abilities." Titled "Re-Discover the U.S.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2002 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles architect Barton Myers is better known for designing large public buildings than private houses. He is the brain behind the award-winning Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, completed in 1993--a flexible facility with movable floors and seats, which allows for multiple uses, and reconfiguration from a flat exhibition hall into a 1,850-seat arena or theater with 900, 1,450 or 1,963 seats.
REAL ESTATE
June 5, 1994
"Architecture and the New Muse: Design, Materials and Technology Shaping Recent Cultural Facilities" will be presented June 17, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA). Moderated by Richard Keating, the program will feature architects Moshe Safdie, Norman Pfeiffer, Barton Myers, Michael Hallmark, Richard Kuhn and Doss Mabe. Admission is $50 for USC Architectural Guild members, $55 for the general public and $30 for students.
NEWS
January 30, 1986
A team of five consulting firms has been chosen by the city to draft proposals for the redevelopment of the Civic Center. Barton Myers Associates of Los Angeles will head the team. The city wants to renovate and expand the center auditorium for community meetings, cultural events and entertainment. For its report, due in six months, the team will study management techniques, potential uses, traffic, parking and landscaping.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1994
The Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts and architects Barton Myers Associates have won raves from two organizations recognizing the center for its architectural design. The center was one of five theaters nationwide to receive a 1994 Honor Award for excellence from the United States Institute of Theater Technology, which hailed it as "the most sophisticated project we've seen in terms of architecture, technology and urban design."
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about good neighbors. Architect and urban planner Barton Myers, who lives in Montecito, entrusted his professional archive to the nearby University Art Museum at UC Santa Barbara. "It is great that I found a home for it," Myers said from his office in Beverly Hills. "This way you can see 30 years of an architect's work. There are a lot of beautiful drawings." A lot means about 700,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
A Los Angeles design team headed by architect Barton Myers has been selected for the U.S. Pavilion at the World's Fair to be held in Seville, Spain, in 1992. The Myers team selection, announced Friday by the U.S. Information Agency, chooses "a building that will establish an image of America that highlights its vitality and creativity in the field of design and which conveys the spirit of a dynamic society confident of its talents and its abilities." Titled "Re-Discover the U.S.A.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | LEON WHITESON
As a young Navy pilot flying over England from a U.S. airfield in the 1950s, Barton Myers began to be excited by his aerial panorama of the spires, domes and towers of such architectural glories as Blenheim Palace and Ely Cathedral. "I happened to live in the guest house of a man named John Crittall, chief of Britain's major window-manufacturing firm," Myers recalled. "He turned me on to architecture and sent me off to audit lectures on architectural history at Cambridge University.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2003 | Diane Haithman
Barton Myers, a Westwood architect best known locally for designing the flexible, multipurpose Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, is once again creating buildings for the arts -- but this time in Arizona. Barton Myers & Associates and Architekton of Tempe have announced a September groundbreaking for a new visual and performing arts center, the Tempe Center for the Arts.
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