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Baseball Cards

SPORTS
January 25, 1989 | ALAN DROOZ, Times Staff Writer
There has been Billy Beer. There has been BillyBall. But there never has been anything like the Billy card controversy that is raging among baseball card collectors. There have been cards printed with the wrong picture or a misspelled name, or a prankster wearing his glove on the wrong hand or holding a shattered bat, so-called error cards to hobbyists.
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NEWS
November 18, 1990 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Bush gears up to send more armored divisions to the Persian Gulf, Dugout Baseball Cards owner Perry Dodd is planning to send a few big guns of his own--former slugger Reggie Jackson, all-star pitcher Dennis (Oil Can) Boyd and superstar shortstop Ozzie Smith. The players, of course, won't be boarding jets for the Middle East. But thousands of baseball cards bearing their pictures and those of other sports heroes will.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1992 | BRUCE RULE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Walk into the financial section of a bookstore and you'll find plenty of advice books on stocks, bonds and real estate. Now a suburban Philadelphia financial adviser has added one to the shelf: a how-to book on what he considers one of the best investments around. "Secret of the Pros" is a $12.95 self-published primer on how to collect, sell and buy baseball cards. "The industry is still going up in popularity," said Mel Cohen, 48, of Aston, who distributes cards on the side.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Major League lockout nearly threw the baseball card business a curve, but Upper Deck, the hottest commodity in that booming market, was already safe at home. Baseball card sales are typically slowest just before spring training opens. But with the delay caused by the teams' lockout of players, some expected the retail card market to suffer a prolonged sag.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1992 | BRUCE RULE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Walk into the financial section of a bookstore and you'll find plenty of advice books on stocks, bonds and real estate. Now a suburban Philadelphia financial adviser has added one to the shelf: a how-to book on what he considers one of the best investments around. "Secret of the Pros" is a $12.95 self-published primer on how to collect, sell and buy baseball cards. "The industry is still going up in popularity," said Mel Cohen, 48, of Aston, who distributes cards on the side.
SPORTS
June 30, 1990 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bids are in to play host to the 1991 National Sports Collectors Convention, an annual event that is the ultimate in baseball card swap meets. Barring any last-minute maneuvering, Jack Petruzzelli figures his bid to hold the convention at the Anaheim Convention Center will win. Dealers at this year's National, as baseball card collectors call it, will vote next Friday in Arlington, Tex., to decide between Anaheim and San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A shareholder in The Upper Deck Company has withdrawn a lawsuit charging that two Orange County men used their positions with a baseball card company to reprint famous cards, made valuable by errors, for personal profit, it was announced Thursday. In a two-page statement released by the company, shareholder William Hemrick admitted that the lawsuit he recently filed in Orange County Superior Court was based on misleading information provided by a disgruntled former employee.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The national pastime's lockout nearly threw the baseball card business a curve, but Upper Deck, the hottest commodity in that booming market, already was safe at home. Baseball card sales are typically slowest just before spring training opens. With the delay caused by the player lockout, some expected the retail card market to suffer a prolonged sag.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1991 | LARRY SPEER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baseball card dealers across Ventura County think professional thieves are stalking their industry after a string of unsolved burglaries netted criminals more than $50,000 in rare cards this summer. Police and sheriff's deputies in Camarillo, Simi Valley and Thousand Oaks are investigating the thefts, although detectives acknowledge that there is little chance of the cards being found.
SPORTS
September 28, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Dan Clements reached into his bag for a roll of a blue duct tape. Dodger blue. Then he pulled out a pack of baseball cards, so shiny that the glare blinded you for a moment. He flipped through the cards, one Dodgers star after another. He had room for only one card, so it needed to be just right. Mike Piazza? Never won a postseason game with the Dodgers. Eric Karros? Same thing. Jackie Robinson? On the one hand, who can go wrong with Jackie Robinson? On the other hand, he never knew of something called a "postseason.
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