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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1992 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 17-year-old Dorsey High School baseball player died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head while aboard the team bus as it returned from a game Tuesday, police said. Wilford Wright, the team's starting shortstop, was playing Russian roulette in the back of the bus when his .22-caliber pistol went off, said the team's coach, former Dodger outfielder Derrel Thomas. But Los Angeles Police Department investigators said the shooting could have been a suicide.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | Kevin Baxter, Brian Bennett
Yasiel Puig's journey to Los Angeles - and riches with the Dodgers - is a serpentine tale of drug cartels, nighttime escapes and international human smuggling. Yet in the booming marketplace for Cuban ballplayers, it is far from unique. Since 2009, nearly three dozen have defected, with at least 25 of them signing contracts worth more than a combined $315 million. Many, like Puig, were spirited away on speedboats to Mexico, Haiti or the Dominican Republic. Once there, they typically were held by traffickers before being released to agents - for a price.
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SPORTS
April 29, 2000 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles Chatman was an exceptional running back and safety at Costa Mesa High, but his days as a football player ended while he was on scholarship at Kent State. Now, with some guidance from his uncle, Cleveland Indian batting coach Clarence Jones, Chatman is playing baseball at Concordia and hoping he didn't wait too long to change his focus. "This is what I should have been doing all along, playing baseball," said Chatman, who rushed for 2,500 yards and 29 touchdowns at Costa Mesa in 1994.
SPORTS
March 29, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
In those heady days when Barry Bonds was hitting a home run just about every day, visitors would flock to the clubhouse of the San Francisco Giants. You would turn to the right for Bonds, for his entourage, for his oversized lounge chair, and for the Giants employee nervously trying to block reporters and other outsiders from approaching the slugger. You would turn to the left for other players, and their standard-issue chairs, and their detached bemusement. Mike Trout is baseball's best player.
SPORTS
July 14, 1992 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kyle Abbott couldn't wait for tonight's All-Star game. Not that the Philadelphia Phillie rookie left-hander will play in it. Heck, he probably won't even watch it on television or listen to it on the radio. Nope. What Abbott wants out of this three-day break in the major league schedule is to catch a break himself, a brief respite from the miserable season he has endured thus far. Abbott, once a top prospect in the Angels' organization, is living a pitcher's nightmare.
SPORTS
February 25, 1998 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
From the time they were old enough to chew bubble gum, Matt Fisher, Matt Cassel and Conor Jackson have been called baseball wonders. Every step of the way, from T-ball through senior league, they've stood out as all-stars. In youth drafts, they were certain No. 1 picks. If only they had agent Dennis Gilbert to negotiate their pizza deals. Time has flown by. They're now sophomores in high school, Fisher and Cassel at Chatsworth, Jackson at El Camino Real.
SPORTS
February 28, 1990 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Dodgers will celebrate their 100th anniversary season without the most celebrated pitcher in franchise history, as Sandy Koufax confirmed Tuesday that he has severed his ties with the organization. Koufax, a Hall of Fame member who served as a minor league pitching instructor since 1979, said he has resigned because he is weary of the job. Although Dodger officials called it a one-year sabbatical, Koufax said he has placed no time frame on the resignation.
SPORTS
April 8, 1992 | TOM HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seattle Mariners' scout Myron Pines has a different perspective when it comes to evaluating potential major league players. While most scouts are content to sit in the stands and watch, Pines gets a closer look--from the dugout. Pines is in his seventh season as baseball coach at Santiago High School, where he helped turn around a struggling program. Last year, he led the Cavaliers to their first outright league championship since 1969.
SPORTS
February 17, 2012 | by Eric Sondheimer
Players to watch in 2012: Pitchers Tyler Brashears, El Toro, Sr. UC Irvine signee was 11-2 with 0.77 ERA Chase DeJong, Long Beach Wilson, Sr. Let's see if anyone can beat him Max Fried, Harvard-Westlake, Sr. Left-hander with elite skills Justin Garza, Bonita, Sr. Was 13-0 in 2011 Lucas Giolito, Harvard-Westlake, Sr. Threw a 99 mph fastball in winter ball Cole Irvin, Servite, Sr. Oregon signee throws strikes...
NEWS
June 14, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
What makes baseball players like Jose Reyes of the New York Mets and Adrian Gonzalez of the Boston Red Sox such good hitters? It might have something to do with the time of day (or night) when the umpire yells, “Play ball!” You see, professional ballplayers are just like the rest of us – some of them are morning people and some of them are night owls. And as anyone who has ever had to drag himself to a 7 a.m. breakfast meeting after staying up to catch the end of “The Colbert Report” knows, it’s hard to perform your best when your work hours are in conflict with your natural sleep cycle.
SCIENCE
March 25, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Young men who exercise keep some of the benefits to their bones into old age, even if they don't keep at it, according to researchers who compared the throwing arms and the nonthrowing arms of professional baseball players over time. Bone mass, size and strength increase with physical activity in youth, but it was unclear whether those benefits carried into later years. The researchers looked at the arms of 103 pro baseball players -- major and minor leagues -- and at the arms of 94 “regular” men; they reported their findings in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
SPORTS
March 13, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 For years, Curtis Godin was a baseball player. Last year, as a junior, he gave up trying to make Mater Dei's varsity baseball team and decided to try something different -- track and field. He ran the 100 meters in 10.79 seconds in his first year. In the off season, he began full-time track training, lifting weights and running. Last week, in his season debut, he ran the fastest time in the state, clocking in at 10.71 seconds. Suddenly, Mater Dei might have a top 100-meter runner.
SPORTS
February 23, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Pitchers Solomon Bates; Oak Hills; Jr.; Gardena Serra transfer was 7-0 with 0.94 ERA. Quinn Brodey; Loyola; Sr.; Stanford signee is left-hander who likes pressure. Griffin Canning; Santa Margarita; Sr.; UCLA signee comes through in big games. Jack Flaherty; Harvard-Westlake; Sr.; Reigning Division 1 player of the year. Nathan Hadley; Loyola; Sr.; Let's see who can hit his slider. Grant Hockin; Damien; Sr.; UCLA signee with good velocity. Garett King; Orange Lutheran; Sr.; Nebraska signee making big-time improvement.
SPORTS
February 21, 2014 | Dylan Hernandez
Explaining how a natural introvert such as himself could flash Mickey Mouse ears in front of more than 50,000 screaming fans, Adrian Gonzalez looked around the Dodgers' locker room. "It's the clubhouse," he said. "It's the city, it's the fans. " The acquisition of Gonzalez and three other players from the Boston Red Sox in 2012 was expected to transform the Dodgers, and it did. What was unknown at the time was that the deal would also change Gonzalez. With the Dodgers, Gonzalez has allowed his personality to emerge in ways it never did with the Red Sox or San Diego Padres.
SPORTS
January 26, 2014 | Mike DiGiovanna
Jerry Kramer used to be bitter about being snubbed by the Hall of Fame, the former Green Bay Packers guard who was an integral part of five championship teams in the 1960s vowing to stick it to the pro football shrine in Canton, Ohio, if he had the chance. "I decided early on that if they ever called, I was going to send them a statuette of my fist with a middle finger raised and tell them to put that in the Hall of Fame," Kramer, 78, said by phone from his home in Boise, Idaho. "I was angry.
SPORTS
January 26, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
A baseball fanfest bringing together minor leaguers and some major leaguers from the Los Angeles area to benefit research for a cure to Crohn's disease was held on Sunday at the Mid Valley baseball complex in Encino. Put together by former Harvard-Westlake pitchers Max Fried and Lucas Giolito, the event drew a good crowd of fans who received free autographs from participating players, many of whom worked out on the mound and at the plate. Jon Garland, a Kennedy High grad who pitched for the Dodgers and Angels, dropped by to offer his support.
SCIENCE
March 25, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Young men who exercise keep some of the benefits to their bones into old age, even if they don't keep at it, according to researchers who compared the throwing arms and the nonthrowing arms of professional baseball players over time. Bone mass, size and strength increase with physical activity in youth, but it was unclear whether those benefits carried into later years. The researchers looked at the arms of 103 pro baseball players -- major and minor leagues -- and at the arms of 94 “regular” men; they reported their findings in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
SPORTS
May 18, 1999 | From Staff Reports
Three Westlake High baseball players, including two starters, were among five students suspended last week for allegedly vandalizing the Thousand Oaks High baseball field. The players did not participate in a Marmonte League game Friday against Simi Valley and are not expected to play the rest of the season. The Ventura County Sheriff's Department is investigating, with charges pending against the juveniles, Sheriff's Deputy John Wright said.
SPORTS
January 15, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Max Fried and Lucas Giolito, former pitching standouts at Harvard-Westlake who became first-round draft choices, have put together a special free event for fans on Sunday, Jan. 26, from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Mid Valley Baseball Complex, 17301 Oxnard Blvd. in Encino. Called Baseball FanFest , fans will be able to watch local professional players in a workout, then get autographs from the players afterward. It's a way for the players to give back to their local community, with free parking and free admission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Michael Weiner, who devoted his adult life to representing Major League Baseball players and rose to become their leader during an era of unprecedented prosperity and labor peace, died Thursday. He was 51. Weiner, who was found to have inoperable brain cancer 15 months ago, died at his New Jersey home, the union said. His casual manner and dress belied his stature as one of the smartest men ever to work in sports. His popularity extended beyond the players and their union to the commissioner's office, and to the very executives against whom he negotiated.
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