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Baseball Players Labor Relations

SPORTS
August 23, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The baseball players' union officially rejected the owners' offer on service time Thursday, but management negotiator Randy Levine said he thought the sides had "inched closer" to an agreement. Negotiations have been put on hold again until Monday, giving owners a chance to plan their next move on the pivotal issue of restoring service time for the 75 regular-season days the players were on strike in 1994-95. Management's labor policy committee will meet with Levine by phone today.
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SPORTS
August 11, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the verge of an armistice in baseball's three-year labor war--or "peace in our time," as a union lawyer called it--negotiators for owners and players yielded to exhaustion Saturday night. Having bargained on an almost constant basis since late Friday morning, talks in New York were recessed in mid-evening Saturday. They will resume about noon today, with likelihood of an agreement on a new labor contract before Monday.
SPORTS
August 10, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Indicating a possible breakthrough in their long labor talks, negotiators for baseball's owners and players met four times Friday. The fourth meeting ended after midnight in New York, but neither side was heading to bed. They expected to reconvene, continuing to work through the night. "There has been movement on both sides," a management negotiator said during a late evening break, refusing to speculate on a possible settlement.
SPORTS
December 6, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were a few snags--what would a baseball labor deal be without complications?--but no last-minute surprises in Dorado Beach, Puerto Rico, on Thursday. Baseball players, as expected, ratified the proposed labor deal, officially ending a bitter four-year battle with owners that forced cancellation of the 1994 World Series and led to more than $1 billion in losses for owners and players during the 232-day strike of 1994-95.
SPORTS
December 5, 1996 | JIM MURRAY
In 1920, when Boston Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees for $125,000 (and a passel of loan guarantees), it was the most expensive deal in the history of baseball, but it was widely held to be an example of how stupid the grand old game had become fiscally. I mean, who was worth $125,000? Babe Ruth was, of course. He was more than a player, he was a god. He was a revolution. He changed the way the game was played forever.
SPORTS
March 21, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Revenue sharing? Why not bring back the replacement players? "I thought we had a handle on it back then," Cincinnati Red owner Marge Schott said Wednesday of baseball's alleged financial problems and the industry's ill-conceived response to the work stoppage of last spring. Leave it to Schott to suggest that baseball missed an opportunity to challenge--and possibly break--the players' union by maintaining the replacement concept until achieving a bargaining agreement that included a salary cap.
SPORTS
January 7, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel President Richard Brown said he's "more optimistic than not" the team will re-sign pitcher Jim Abbott, but the sides will have to close a considerable gap in negotiations if they are to strike a deal by Monday's deadline. Neither Brown nor Scott Boras, Abbott's agent, would comment on the specifics of the negotiations, but sources indicated the sides are at least $1 million apart on a potential three-year deal.
SPORTS
November 7, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Major league baseball owners overwhelmingly rejected the proposed labor agreement during a seven-hour meeting Wednesday but voted unanimously to accept it if the players' union agrees to what acting Commissioner Bud Selig called "certain modifications and clarifications." Modifications and clarifications? While Selig insisted that the owners could accept the "vast majority of issues" in the proposed agreement, it was learned that they basically want an entire rewrite.
SPORTS
November 27, 1996 | MIKE DOWNEY
Peace is at hand, Henry Kissinger would say, had he negotiated the baseball truce talks. Except for a dotted i here or a slashed $ there, an agreement has been forged between the workers and the bosses, so, on with the Show.
SPORTS
November 15, 1996 | Staff and Wire Reports
Delino DeShields' agent said Wednesday that six teams have contacted him about the free-agent second baseman and that no decision on a contract will be made before next week. Adam Katz said the Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, St. Louis Cardinals, San Diego Padres, Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds have shown interest, and that reports that DeShields had agreed to a two-year deal with the Reds were inaccurate.
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