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Basil Wolverton

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NEWS
October 4, 2007 | Alex Chun, Special to The Times
Cartoonist Basil Wolverton's biomorphic caricatures are anything but pretty. But that didn't stop him from becoming one of the most influential cartoonists of the 1960s underground comix movement -- a movement that included Robert Williams, Art Spiegelman and Robert Crumb. In recognition of that influence, the Grand Central Art Center in Santa Ana is hosting a retrospective featuring more than 100 Wolverton originals.
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NEWS
October 11, 2007
Thank you for Alex Chun's article about cartoonist Basil Wolverton ("Just Mad About Basil Wolverton," Oct. 4). I remember how Wolverton burst into fame in 1946 when Al Capp's "Li'l Abner" comic strip had a running episode about Lena the Hyena, the ugliest woman in the world. Her face was so horrible that the sight of it would cause any who saw her to go insane. So, of course, Capp never showed her face.
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NEWS
October 11, 2007
Thank you for Alex Chun's article about cartoonist Basil Wolverton ("Just Mad About Basil Wolverton," Oct. 4). I remember how Wolverton burst into fame in 1946 when Al Capp's "Li'l Abner" comic strip had a running episode about Lena the Hyena, the ugliest woman in the world. Her face was so horrible that the sight of it would cause any who saw her to go insane. So, of course, Capp never showed her face.
NEWS
October 4, 2007 | Alex Chun, Special to The Times
Cartoonist Basil Wolverton's biomorphic caricatures are anything but pretty. But that didn't stop him from becoming one of the most influential cartoonists of the 1960s underground comix movement -- a movement that included Robert Williams, Art Spiegelman and Robert Crumb. In recognition of that influence, the Grand Central Art Center in Santa Ana is hosting a retrospective featuring more than 100 Wolverton originals.
BOOKS
December 17, 2006 | David L. Ulin, david.ulin@latimes.com David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
WHO says comics aren't for kids anymore? Not Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly. Between 2000 and 2003, the husband-and-wife team -- he, the Pulitzer Prize-winning creator of "Maus"; she, the art editor of the New Yorker -- re-imagined children's comics with "Little Lit": three oversized hardcover anthologies geared toward younger readers and featuring strips by some of the most accomplished talents in the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1995 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another cartoon exhibition? Do we really need another survey just months after such material was shown at the Muckenthaler Cultural Center and at Orange Coast College? Ah, but "Takeoffs: Cartoon and Caricature in the Fine Arts"--at Chapman University's Guggenheim Gallery through Nov. 12--is on to something else entirely. The show does include some "real" cartoons: a set of suavely observed grotesqueries by Basil Wolverton, admired by several younger artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the throes of a love affair with Pop Art in the '60s, a would-be artist named Richard Turner decided to follow Roy Lichtenstein's lead. * "I was an undergrad and realized I didn't want to learn how to draw," recalls Turner. So, like Lichtenstein, he found himself an overhead projector and traced a comic-strip image onto a canvas.
BOOKS
October 12, 2003 | Reviews are provided courtesy of Publishers Weekly, where they first appeared. Copyright 2003, Publishers Weekly.
One Witch Laura Leuck, illustrated by S.D. Schindler Walker & Co.: 32 pp., $15.95 Laura LEUCK'S ("Goodnight, Baby Monster") smooth counting rhyme tracks a witch as she collects nasty "goodies" from ghosts, goblins and the like. "Two cats / inside a pail / gave the witch / a fish's tail. / Three scarecrows / stuffed with straw / gave the witch / a blackbird's claw."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1994 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Kustom Kulture: Von Dutch, Ed 'Big Daddy' Roth, Robert Williams & Others," last summer's big show at the Laguna Art Museum, was a ground-breaking exhibition that lingers in the mind. Its major appeal was the novelty of seeing a show primarily devoted to irreverent imagery that taps into teen-age male preoccupations with speed, violence, power, gross-out situations and automotive craftsmanship.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2009 | Reed Johnson
The artist who gave the comic-book world Mr. Natural, Angelfood McSpade and Fritz the Cat has a new cast of characters: Adam, Eve, Noah, Abraham and, well, You Know Who. R. Crumb, the Albrecht Dürer of the urban demimonde, has just published "The Book of Genesis Illustrated" (W.W. Norton), a profusely pictorial, surprisingly faithful version of the first 50 chapters of the Old Testament. In theory, the project may strike some as perverse, like having Charles Bukowski pen the script for a remake of "It's a Wonderful Life."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1985 | WILLIAM WILSON
The name Red Grooms evokes the antic, flamboyant energy stereotypically associated with carrot-topped persons. It also suggests various character types from a gregarious Southern Gentleman to a baggy-pants burlesque comedian. One thing it does not suggest--at least not on the West Coast--is a veteran New York artist dripping great dollops of talent into heaving seas of accomplishment. In the West, we have heard of Red Grooms without seeing much of his art in the living flesh.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009 | Reed Johnson
So you've just dipped into one of Sergio Aragones' cartoons. Relax. Make yourself at home. The artist would like you to feel perfectly at ease in the miniature cosmos he has created, which, you may have observed, is as spatially balanced and packed with information as a Medieval prayer book. Notice the careful detailing -- of the rustic Mexican village street, the rock concert, the battlefield, whatever.
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