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OPINION
May 9, 2012 | By Robert Zaretsky
It was no surprise, of course, whenFrance'snew Socialist president, Francois Hollande, celebrated his election over the weekend at the Place de la Bastille. Once the site of the nation's most notorious prison, the square has long been the place that French leftists proclaim their victories. But while many commentators noted the symbolic importance of the Bastille, they overlook how this symbol has changed over time - a transformation that may hold a lesson for President-elect Hollande.
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NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
To celebrate Bastille Day (known in France as La Fête Nationale ) on July 14, it's obligatory to drink French wine, non? You can never go wrong with a bottle of Champagne, but somehow rouge or blanc makes more sense - for the red and white in the tricolor flag. Head to the closest wine store to pick up a bottle of Beaujolais cru or gnarly Côtes-du-Rhône, or maybe a grassy Sancerre.  If you want to be more deliberate about your picks, here are half a dozen French wines guaranteed to put you in the spirit of La Marseillaise . PHOTOS: 5 French wines for Bastille Day You might want to cook something French, too, maybe a classic Provençal daube (beef braised in red wine)
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NEWS
August 4, 1985 | BEN SHERWOOD, Times Staff Writer
Ask most Frenchmen about the Revolution of 1789, and they are likely to respond: "Liberte, egalite, fraternite. " Nearly 200 years ago, they will say proudly, a republic replaced a monarchy in France and freedom triumphed over oppression. Mention the revolution to a tiny, fervent French minority, though, and the reaction is entirely different. "An abomination," a university student said. "The revolution was a grave mistake, a tragedy."
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Parachutists and a team of Navy Seals will join forces Sunday to help the Marché Bacchus French Bistro and Wine Shop celebrate Bastille Day. Between 5:30 and 6 p.m., members of the Vegas Extreme Skydiving team will be making a jump into Lake Jacqueline, on which the restaurant sits in the northwest part of Las Vegas . A group of Navy Seals   will then pull the skydivers from the water. The bistro will continue the celebration of the French national holiday, which commemorates the start of the French Revolution on July 14, 1789, as owner Jeff Wyatt uses a special saber to slice the tops off several bottles of Champagne.
WORLD
June 28, 2011 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
A few feet from an overgrown path that hugs the banks of the still, green Marne River, two fishermen doze in a small wooden boat under the buzzing wings of insects. Awakened on a humid late afternoon, they raise a beer and shout, "Bonjour!" A little farther on, the riverside path winds toward a tiny island covered with trees, and the muffled sound of music. The trees break for a clearing, revealing a terrace set with red-and-white checkered tablecloths on picnic tables under wisteria-covered trellises.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Striking technicians at the Paris Opera house forced the cancellation of a production of "Faust" this week, but on Wednesday they agreed to let a planned cancer benefit gala starring Frank Sinatra, Liza Minelli and Sammy Davis Jr. go ahead on Tuesday. The technicians are protesting plans to transfer staff to a new People's Opera at Place de la Bastille, which is still under construction. Performances of Tchaikovsky's ballet, "Sleeping Beauty," which is playing on alternate nights with "Faust," are being disrupted by a separate pay strike by the opera's dancers.
TRAVEL
February 16, 1986 | STUART NIXON, Nixon is general manager of the Redwood Empire Assn., San Francisco.
Some searchers find the heart of Paris on the Champs Elysees, some in the Ritz Bar. I found my version in a graveyard. One humid fall afternoon we visited La Cimitiere du Pere--Lachaise, where half of France's heroes rest, and which was about to receive France's newest heroine. At the Place de la Bastille on the Right Bank, a surprised matron replied to my inquiry: "To say au revoir to Simone Signoret?"
BOOKS
July 5, 1987 | Steven Englund, Englund teaches French revolution at the Universite de Paris-VIII and is writing a book on French nationalism in the late 19th Century.
On a flight to Paris from Gabon, Mort Rosenblum, senior foreign correspondent with the Associated Press, found himself sitting next to a young Gabonese cabinet minister. After some wine, the man began talking frankly about his irritation over the foreign policy of Gabon's former imperial master, France: "The French are always talking about emotional ties. Well it's emotional one way. From us. They play on our emotions to make money off of us.
TRAVEL
November 27, 1994
Thank you so much for your article on the Bastille District ("Cafe Cool," Sept. 4). My new bride and I honeymooned in Paris in October. We walked several miles and stopped at about 10 hotels on the Left Bank only to find the entire town was full due to a fashion convention. We weren't far from the area you described, so we gave it a try. It only took us two stops to find a very clean room with a bath at the Hotel Pax (12, rue de Charonnes, 75011 Paris), for $45 a night. The proprietress was very pleasant and she also spoke a little English.
NEWS
July 12, 1990
The French national holiday Bastille Day, celebrated Saturday, commemorates the 18th-Century insurrection over the power of the crown initiated after the Bastille was overtaken by an incensed mob. "Today in France we celebrate with lots of picnics and fireworks and fairs," Norbert Viaud said. Viaud is owner of Raffine Gourmet Boutique in Westlake Village, which offers a variety of French foods and desserts and can provide delicious gourmet entrees to fill a Bastille Day picnic basket.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Isabella Alsobrook
Bastille Day Brunch: In celebration of Bastille Day , the French independence holiday, Church & State Bistro is offering a La Jour de la Bastille brunch from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on July 14. The traditional French menu includes oysters, foie de volaille with toasted baguette, lamb merguez sandwiches, brochette de poulet, ratatouille, and mousse au chocolat. The brunch will be accompanied with drinks -- pastis,   picpoul, panache, rosé, and mint spritzers -- and a pétanque tournament.
OPINION
May 9, 2012 | By Robert Zaretsky
It was no surprise, of course, whenFrance'snew Socialist president, Francois Hollande, celebrated his election over the weekend at the Place de la Bastille. Once the site of the nation's most notorious prison, the square has long been the place that French leftists proclaim their victories. But while many commentators noted the symbolic importance of the Bastille, they overlook how this symbol has changed over time - a transformation that may hold a lesson for President-elect Hollande.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Thursday is Bastille Day, an explosion of parades, public events, parties and, well, explosions, in honor of French culture. Like Independence Day in America, the celebration ends with the skies full of fireworks. But you don't need to be at the Eiffel Tower to celebrate the day. The Paris fireworks, which will take place at 2 p.m. Pacific time, can be viewed from this French website . Check it out. A digital clock on the homepage is counting down the minutes until the big event.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Nothing like Bastille Day to get you thinking about the glamorous French Foreign Legion, which was formed in 1831. "Whatever your origins, nationality or religion might be, whatever qualifications you may or may not have, whatever your social or professional status might be, whether you are married or single, the French Foreign Legion offers you a chance to start a new life ... " So says the legion's website , which includes a pretty impressive...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Naturalist Anne LaBastille became something of a cult hero among modern women for embracing a distinctly frontier past. When her marriage fell apart in the mid-1960s, she took refuge in the wilderness, building a log cabin on a hidden lake in the Adirondack Mountains and then carving an influential writing career out of her remote existence. Both the women's and environmental movements were on the rise in 1976 when she published "Woodswoman," the first in a four-volume autobiographical series that celebrated her adventures — and inspired women across the nation to engage in the great outdoors.
WORLD
June 28, 2011 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
A few feet from an overgrown path that hugs the banks of the still, green Marne River, two fishermen doze in a small wooden boat under the buzzing wings of insects. Awakened on a humid late afternoon, they raise a beer and shout, "Bonjour!" A little farther on, the riverside path winds toward a tiny island covered with trees, and the muffled sound of music. The trees break for a clearing, revealing a terrace set with red-and-white checkered tablecloths on picnic tables under wisteria-covered trellises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1996
Never mind all the coaching and rehearsing that went into Friday's reenactment of the infamous storming of the Bastille. When the time came, all 27 third-graders bused from their Long Beach elementary school to a Cerritos bistro acted precisely as their Parisian counterparts had in 1789: They charged a mock prison with all the grace of a hungry mob. Giggles gave them away, but the students from Roosevelt Elementary were convincingly clad in peasant costumes they helped create.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2000 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bastille Day, July 14, is the most important national holiday in France. It marks the date in 1789, during the early days of the French Revolution, when workers attacked the prison in Paris, primarily looking for munitions. The Bastille, a notorious prison in the early 1700s, held only seven prisoners and was slated for demolition. Still, the seemingly miraculous capture of this former medieval fortress was a powerful and lasting symbolic act.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2010
FAMILY Children of Many Colors Native American Powwow Native American intertribal singing, dancing, drumming, celebrating, ceremonies, arts, crafts, food and more. Teepees and other traditional dwellings will be on display. Moorpark College athletic field, 7075 Campus Road, Moorpark. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. today; 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sun. $2 suggested donation per vehicle. http://www.redbirdsvision.org . San Clemente Ocean Festival "The Greatest Show on Surf" kicks off its 34th year with sand-and-sea-related activities for the entire family at the San Clemente Ocean Festival.
OPINION
July 13, 2008 | Susan Nagel, Susan Nagel, a professor at Marymount Manhattan College, is the author, most recently, of "Marie-Therese, Child of Terror: The Fate of Marie Antoinette's Daughter."
It may not be surprising that Prince Charles-Henri de Lobkowicz, a descendant of France's King Charles X (the youngest brother of the executed Louis XVI), wears a black tie every year on Bastille Day. Or that Marc de Gontaut-Biron, a member of an ancient noble French family, wears only royal blue, the color of the Bourbon flag, on July 14.
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