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BUSINESS
November 11, 1997 | Associated Press
General Motors Corp. will begin using batteries that nearly double the driving range of electric pickups between charges. Utilities in Detroit, Atlanta and Los Angeles will each test an electric pickup that has a nickel-metal hydride battery, GM spokesman Dick Thompson said. The batteries will be installed in the Detroit-based auto maker's electric cars in California and Arizona starting sometime next year, he said. Honda Motor Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1989 | SHAWN MAREE SMITH, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court jury has awarded a Redding couple $9.7 million after determining that a battery manufacturer knowingly distributed defective batteries, one of which exploded when the husband tried to help a couple jump-start their car. The jury awarded general damages of $3.2 million on Thursday and punitive damages of $6.5 million on Friday to Gary and Mona Jones after finding that Johnson Controls Inc., manufacturer of the Die-Hard battery, and Sears Roebuck & Co. Inc.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1994 | From Reuters
Ford Motor Co. said Monday that the sodium sulfur battery remains promising for commercial electric cars despite two fires in test vehicles using the high-heat propulsion system. Ford last week grounded its fleet of 36 Ecostar test vehicles made with the sodium sulfur battery pending an investigation into the cause of the fires.
AUTOS
April 25, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
“These are not your grandma's Priuses.” So began Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa at Monday's press conference announcing Formula E racing was coming to the city. The open-wheel race series will make 10 stops around the world in its inaugural year, with L.A. expected to host a race in late 2014 or early 2015. Indeed, the cars used in these races are indeed nothing like Priuses. Capable of speeds up to 140 mph, race organizers said these fully electric cars are built to demonstrate to the public that EVs don't have to be boring or slow.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2006 | Claire Hoffman, Times Staff Writer
Dell Inc., the world's largest computer maker, acknowledged Monday that it would recall 4.1 million notebook computer batteries because they can overheat and sometimes catch fire. It would be the largest recall in the history of the consumer electronics industry. Dell's action will affect batteries in its notebooks sold between April 2004 and July 18, 2006. That includes 2.7 million battery packs sold in the U.S. and 1.4 million abroad. The recall, set to be announced today by Dell and the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1995 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Electric cars using lead-acid batteries could dramatically increase lead pollution in the country and set back a decades-long effort to eliminate the toxic substance from the environment, according to a study by three researchers for Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Big Three auto makers are forming a Manhattan Project-style research consortium with utilities, battery makers and the federal government to develop a cheap, durable battery capable of powering the non-polluting electric cars of the future, officials said Friday. The lack of such a battery is the most important technological impediment to a practical electric vehicle, said Roberta J. Nichols, a manager in Ford Motor Co.'s alternative fuels department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1990 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John DeTomaso, a cargo employee for Pan American World Airways, thought he had a good idea on how to make a few extra bucks. So, in 1978, he paid $300 for unclaimed merchandise that the airline stored in bins and periodically sold to the public sight unseen. In the luck of the draw, two of his bins contained a surfboard, Indian-style costume jewelry and cheap clothing, he said. Another bin contained 13,000 watch batteries.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1999 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a career that spanned 40 years in the auto industry, Robert A. Lutz often displayed a Hollywood flair for the dramatic. Take the 1992 Detroit auto show. Lutz, then the No. 2 executive at Chrysler Corp., unveiled the 1993 Jeep Grand Cherokee by driving a cherry-red model through a plate-glass window.
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