Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBattery
IN THE NEWS

Battery

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2008 | Nardine Saad
An Anaheim chiropractor has been convicted of sexually assaulting four patients in his office who were referred to him for treatment by attorneys after car accident injuries, officials said Tuesday. A jury found Chi Van Pham, 43, of Yorba Linda guilty of four felony counts of sexual battery by fraud and two misdemeanor counts of battery. The jury hung on the charges related to a fifth victim who was 13 at the time of the molestation and sister to one of the four women whom Pham was convicted of assaulting, according to a district attorney's office report.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2008 | Associated Press
An attorney for former Blue Lake Police Chief David Gundersen is asking a judge to throw out his client's battery and weapons convictions. A jury acquitted Gundersen earlier this year on two dozen counts of spousal rape. Instead, it found him guilty of lesser battery charges for taking nude photos of his wife without permission. He also was convicted of illegally possessing weapons. On Wednesday, his attorney argued in a motion that the verdicts were "contrary to both law and evidence."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Kid Rock has been sentenced to a year's probation and fined $1,000 for his role in a fight at a suburban Atlanta Waffle House last fall. The DeKalb County solicitor's office said the 37-year-old rock singer was also sentenced Monday to six hours of anger management counseling and 80 hours of community service. The entertainer, whose real name is Robert J. Ritchie, pleaded no contest to one count of simple battery. Four counts of battery were dropped. From the Associated Press cutline> ##et-quick23#k4f8vync#0N2668TB### Bailey Hanks is "Legally Blonde."
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik, The Economy Hub
Every battery needs recharging, and those that operate the Economy Hub are no exception. We'll be taking time off over the next two weeks. Blogging in that period will be sparse, on an as-needed basis only. Normal programming will resume on April 28.  
BUSINESS
August 25, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
As the world's first mass-produced gasoline-electric car, the Toyota Prius has become the iPod of hybrids. More than 2 million of these automotive icons have been sold since the Prius was introduced in 1997, with mostly minor changes to its aerodynamic profile. But that's about to change with the 2012 Prius v — a larger version that looks as if growth hormones were slipped into the tank. Due in showrooms in October, the v — for "versatility" — lengthens the rear cargo hold on the regular Prius and ratchets up the hatch, opening up far more space in the back 40 without sacrificing too many miles per gallon.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2001 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a Stage 2 power alert and I could be taken offline any minute if the California Independent System Operator orders rolling blackouts. But I'm not worried. I have a backup system that will keep my PC running at least two hours--long enough to get through a typical blackout. To test my backup system, I staged my own blackout by switching off the circuit breaker that provides power to my office. I'm still working. I'm writing this column from my desktop PC, which is plugged into an xPower 600 backup power system that delivers 600 watts of AC electrical current.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1995
Michael Schrage's "Marketers Own the Electric Vehicle's Future, Not Engineers" (Jan. 19) is typical of the political approaches to battery-driven cars, which will not help with what is a problem in basic chemistry. When gasoline and air burn in a cylinder, the transfer of electrons and energy is quick and remarkably complete. Putting a few gallons of gasoline in a tank is fast and easy, while the air supplies itself. Not so with a battery. The same electrons must go through an "oxidizing" reaction, but the oxygen and the fuel must both be within the battery, and the oxidation goes slowly through some "electrolyte."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|