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NATIONAL
March 21, 2010 | By David Zucchino
The proud lieutenant commander of the Smithfield Light Infantry of the Sons of Confederate Veterans is John M. Booker, a burly retired veterinarian with a trove of Civil War books and an abiding fascination with all things Confederate. Since 2006, Booker has devoted himself to erecting a statue of Joseph E. Johnston, the last Confederate general to mount an effective fight against Union forces. Johnston ultimately surrendered to Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman after the pivotal Battle of Bentonville, fought in March 1865 on a site a few miles from Booker's white-columned Greek Revival home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
When plans for a Holocaust memorial in Berlin were announced years ago, German writer Martin Walser wondered how many monuments to shame his country would have to build. It was a telling sentiment for a nation that could not cleanse the past yet wanted its young freed from the stain of their Nazi ancestors. The ruin of World War II - bones of the fallen are still occasionally dug up in forests outside Berlin - led to decades of national silence, anger, reparation and collective guilt.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
British soldiers on the front lines in Afghanistan have been armed with pocket-sized spy drones that can give operators bird's-eye views of the battlefield below. The little flying machine, dubbed Black Hornet Nano, is just 4 inches long and weighs about a half-ounce. It flies like a helicopter, allowing it to hover and dart back and forth. “We used it to look for insurgent firing points and check out exposed areas of the ground before crossing, which is a real asset,” Sgt. Christopher Petherbridge with Britain's Brigade Reconnaissance Force told the Associated Press . The drone, which resembles a child's toy, is made by the Norwegian company Prox Dynamics AS. According to the company's website, the Hornet can fly indoors or outdoors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2014 | By John Horn
Marcus Luttrell is very polite and quiet - "Yessir," "No, ma'am," "Thank you very much" - but his abiding civil demeanor can't mask the fact that the physically imposing former Navy SEAL isn't inclined to suffer fools. At a breakfast meeting at the Four Seasons hotel in Beverly Hills not that long ago, a waitress informed Luttrell that his companion dog, which Luttrell uses to help him deal with a traumatic brain injury suffered in combat, could no longer sit next to him on a banquette.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Near the height of the Afghanistan war, the Pentagon spent $297 million on a seven-story blimp-like aircraft - as long as a football field - that would hover over the war zone for weeks at a time, beaming back crucial intelligence. But as the military wound down its presence in the Middle East, plans for the unmanned floating spy center deflated. The aircraft fell behind schedule, became 12,000 pounds overweight and was ultimately canceled after just one test flight. Last month, the Pentagon quietly decided to sell back the sophisticated spyship to the British company that built it for $301,000 - a fraction of its investment.
NATIONAL
January 19, 2013 | By Candy Thomson
The DNA of a battle that helped turn the tide of a war going horribly wrong for America lay buried just 6 inches below a Maryland cornfield. For nearly two centuries, musket balls, canister shot and other artifacts from intense fighting at Caulk's Field waited to tell the story of a sweltering August night in 1814, when militiamen sprang a trap on a British raiding party bent on destruction. How did the citizen-soldiers best their battle-tested foes? State archaeologist Julie Schablitsky hopes to figure that out. With the help of cadaver-sniffing dogs and history buffs armed with metal detectors, she is retracing the footsteps of Sir Peter Parker, a British marine captain who led 170 troops, and a like number of militiamen commanded by Col. Philip Reed.
NEWS
August 25, 1996 | From Associated Press
With a light breeze rustling a Confederate flag, the remains of a soldier known only as "Rebel Butler" were buried Saturday, 132 years after he died in one of the Civil War's fiercest battles. Men in gray wool uniforms and women in black veils dropped clods of red clay onto a tiny coffin containing a skull that was found on the battlefield at Spotsylvania Courthouse and carried home as a memento by a Union soldier.
OPINION
January 10, 2013 | By Michael Kinsley
The most famous painting of the 20th century, Picasso's "Guernica," commemorates the 1937 bombing of this small Spanish town by the German air force, in support of Gen. Francisco Franco's fascists in the Spanish Civil War. Hard to believe, but this was history's first extensive bombing of a civilian population. In his book "Postwar," historian Tony Judt pointed out that more civilians died in World War II, of various causes, than did soldiers. That was not true of World War I or of most earlier conflicts.
HEALTH
October 5, 2009 | Melissa Healy
Last month, when University of Southern California wide receiver Garrett Green bobbled the football on a key play against Washington State, red flags went up among the Trojans' athletic trainers on the sidelines. Only minutes before, Green had tackled an opponent -- hard -- on a kickoff return. His sudden lack of coordination struck team trainer Russ Romano as a pretty likely sign of concussion. Romano called Green to the sidelines, asked him a few quick questions and got back answers confused enough to take the senior from Chatsworth out of the game.
NATIONAL
September 16, 2012 | By Michael Dresser
The fighting that killed or wounded 21,000 Americans in the rolling hills of western Maryland was over in about 12 grisly hours. But a century and a half after the bloodiest day in American military history, the struggle to preserve the ground where Union and Confederate soldiers fought the Battle of Antietam only now appears close to a declaration of victory. As Americans gather to honor the sacrifice of those who fell Sept. 17, 1862 - as they are doing this weekend and Monday on the 150th anniversary - they will do so at one of the nation's best-preserved Civil War sites.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
ALBUQUERQUE - A high-desert city in one of the poorest states in the nation has become the abortion debate's latest battlefield and a testing ground for whether abortion limits can be imposed on the local level. Early voting is underway in Albuquerque for an election Tuesday, which will decide whether to ban abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Although similar bans have been passed by state legislatures, New Mexico's largest city is believed to be the first municipality in the country to place such an initiative on a ballot.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Near the height of the Afghanistan war, the Pentagon spent $297 million on a seven-story blimp-like aircraft - as long as a football field - that would hover over the war zone for weeks at a time, beaming back crucial intelligence. But as the military wound down its presence in the Middle East, plans for the unmanned floating spy center deflated. The aircraft fell behind schedule, became 12,000 pounds overweight and was ultimately canceled after just one test flight. Last month, the Pentagon quietly decided to sell back the sophisticated spyship to the British company that built it for $301,000 - a fraction of its investment.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
A Maryland-based Ku Klux Klan group plans on holding an event in Gettysburg National Military Park, site of the three-day Civil War battle, park officials said. The Confederate White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, a white supremacy group, will stage a three-hour event on Oct. 5, on the battlefield's grounds, just a stone's throw from the national cemetery. President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address - regarded as one of most famous speeches in U.S. history - was delivered at the dedication of the national cemetery.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Robin Wright
Here's a scorecard on how the U.S.-Russia deal to rid Syria of its chemical weapons may play out for some of the key players: • A relief for the Obama administration and even more for the American public, which opposes the potential slippery slope of even a limited intervention. • A setback for interventionists who favor greater U.S. involvement on Syria, where 99% of the deaths have been from conventional weapons. • A boon for Russian President Vladimir Putin, who's struggled to rebuild Moscow's status on the world stage since the Soviet Union's demise.
OPINION
September 4, 2013
Re "To Mideast, U.S. policy on region seems adrift," Sept. 2 Friends and foes alike are angry at us. Maybe we're on to something. The Syrian rebels are angry because we won't bomb immediately, whereas the Syrian government thinks we're soft. Israel, our alleged best friend in the region, thinks we haven't shown enough gumption. And no one's asking why we aren't talking to the new president of Iran, who claims to want an opening of new avenues. The Middle East is dangerous and uncontrollable.
WORLD
March 29, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman, Los Angeles Times
TEL AVIV - Israel's highest-ranking female soldier says efforts to draft male ultra-Orthodox students into the Israel Defense Forces should not come at the expense of women's advancement in the army. Last year, the nation's Supreme Court determined that a legal exemption for the ultra-Orthodox from mandatory military service was unfair, and the issue is a top legislative priority of the newly formed Israeli government. Orna Barbivai, 50, Israel's first female major general and commander of the army's personnel department, says the nation has come a long way in integrating women into meaningful military professions, including allowing them to serve as pilots and in a special combat battalion with 60% female members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1991 | GLENN ZORPETTE, Zorpette is an editor at IEE Spectrum magazine in New York
It is war unlike any other that has been fought. True, combatants meet on a "battlefield" where, for all appearances, they blast away at one another from tanks, airplanes and helicopters. But fighting alongside the troops are robots. Invisible, ghostly observers can move back and forth in time, soar over the battlefield in "flying carpets" and infiltrate tanks, unnoticed by the vehicles' occupants. No one dies or even gets hurt. Welcome to the virtual war, now being fought in high-tech simulators in the United States and Germany.
WORLD
March 29, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman, Los Angeles Times
TEL AVIV - Israel's highest-ranking female soldier says efforts to draft male ultra-Orthodox students into the Israel Defense Forces should not come at the expense of women's advancement in the army. Last year, the nation's Supreme Court determined that a legal exemption for the ultra-Orthodox from mandatory military service was unfair, and the issue is a top legislative priority of the newly formed Israeli government. Orna Barbivai, 50, Israel's first female major general and commander of the army's personnel department, says the nation has come a long way in integrating women into meaningful military professions, including allowing them to serve as pilots and in a special combat battalion with 60% female members.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
British soldiers on the front lines in Afghanistan have been armed with pocket-sized spy drones that can give operators bird's-eye views of the battlefield below. The little flying machine, dubbed Black Hornet Nano, is just 4 inches long and weighs about a half-ounce. It flies like a helicopter, allowing it to hover and dart back and forth. “We used it to look for insurgent firing points and check out exposed areas of the ground before crossing, which is a real asset,” Sgt. Christopher Petherbridge with Britain's Brigade Reconnaissance Force told the Associated Press . The drone, which resembles a child's toy, is made by the Norwegian company Prox Dynamics AS. According to the company's website, the Hornet can fly indoors or outdoors.
NATIONAL
January 19, 2013 | By Candy Thomson
The DNA of a battle that helped turn the tide of a war going horribly wrong for America lay buried just 6 inches below a Maryland cornfield. For nearly two centuries, musket balls, canister shot and other artifacts from intense fighting at Caulk's Field waited to tell the story of a sweltering August night in 1814, when militiamen sprang a trap on a British raiding party bent on destruction. How did the citizen-soldiers best their battle-tested foes? State archaeologist Julie Schablitsky hopes to figure that out. With the help of cadaver-sniffing dogs and history buffs armed with metal detectors, she is retracing the footsteps of Sir Peter Parker, a British marine captain who led 170 troops, and a like number of militiamen commanded by Col. Philip Reed.
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