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Baudelaire

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May 2, 1986 | COLIN GARDNER
"Artificial Paradise" is the title of an eclectic group show that brings together artists as wide ranging as Robert Yarber, Michael McMillen and Llyn Foulkes in an attempt to explore some of the more painterly elements of that slippery "genre" called Neo-Surrealism. The title is taken from Baudelaire, although it has more to do with a 1985 German exhibition of the same name that examined painting and art collecting as a form of psychological and aesthetic escapism.
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December 6, 2012 | By Thomas McGonigle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
La Folie Baudelaire By Roberto Calasso Translated from the Italian by Alastair McEwen Farrar Straus and Giroux: 339 pp., $35 Charles Baudelaire is more scandalous today than he was more than 150 years ago. Then, he was an obscure poet with one partly suppressed book, "Flowers of Evil"; an art critic when there didn't seem to be any major artists; and the translator-promoter of a marginal foreign writer named Edgar Allan Poe. Today,...
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NEWS
December 8, 1987 | ROSS MILLER, Miller teaches English and American Studies at the University of Connecticut. He is a frequent contributor to the Book Review. and
Image and Word, the Interaction of 20th-Century Photography and Text by Jefferson Hunter (Harvard University Press: $25; 233 pages, illustrated) Photography has never been fully accepted as an art. People who wait in line to see a celebrated show of paintings, a dance concert or a visiting orchestra will more likely show you their slides of Europe than spend time in front of carefully printed and framed photographs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
I don't know that Baudelaire meant music in his poem "Invitation to the Voyage," when he thought of a world far away -- exotic, unobtainable, a land lost in love's gaze. "All is order there, and elegance," he wrote, "pleasure, peace and opulence." But I think he did. Music as an outpost of order, pleasure, peace and opulence kept Bartok and Stravinsky sane when their world was not. In 1936, with the Nazi takeover of Hungary inevitable, Bartok turned to fugues and the mathematical Fibonacci series for "Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta," one of his most magical scores.
BOOKS
July 1, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER ROBINSON, Christopher Robinson is professor of European literature at Oxford University and the author of several books, including "C.P. Cavafy" and "French Literature in the Twentieth Century."
It is an odd fact that poets tend to be either larger-than-life figures of rebellion, as Lord Byron and Allen Ginsberg were, or that they happen to lead lives of (at least outward) banal conformity: Mallarme the schoolmaster, Philip Larkin the librarian, Wallace Stevens the insurance man. Constantine P. Cavafy belonged firmly to the latter group.
NEWS
March 21, 1985 | From Reuters
A first edition of "Les Fleurs du Mal" ("The Flowers of Evil") by Charles Baudelaire was sold for $130,000 at an auction of rare 19th-Century books Wednesday. The slim, handwritten volume of poetry was bought by Pierre Beres, a Parisian rare-book dealer.
BOOKS
November 27, 1988 | Michael Palmer
A man undergoes pain sitting at a piano knowing thousands will die while he is playing He has two thoughts about this If he should stop they would be free of pain If he could get the notes right he would be free of pain In the second case the first thought would be erased causing pain It is this instance of playing he would say to himself my eyes have grown hollow like yours my head is enlarged though empty of thought Such thoughts destroy music and this at least is good From "Sun"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Thomas McGonigle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
La Folie Baudelaire By Roberto Calasso Translated from the Italian by Alastair McEwen Farrar Straus and Giroux: 339 pp., $35 Charles Baudelaire is more scandalous today than he was more than 150 years ago. Then, he was an obscure poet with one partly suppressed book, "Flowers of Evil"; an art critic when there didn't seem to be any major artists; and the translator-promoter of a marginal foreign writer named Edgar Allan Poe. Today,...
BOOKS
April 26, 1998 | ROGER SHATTUCK, Roger Shattuck is the author of several books, including "The Banquet Years: The French Avant-Garde Before World War I," "Forbidden Knowledge" and "The Innocent Eye: On Modern Literature & the Arts." His essay is a revised version of the second annual Irving Howe Memorial Lecture, which he delivered at the Center for the Humanities, City University of New York
Twenty centuries ago, Horace in his brief and celebrated lines in "The Art of Poetry" suggested that art at its best fulfills a double purpose: to instruct and to delight. These two factors lived and worked together for centuries. Today, however, a third factor--art for art's sake--complicates the picture. We now have to deal with three positions that, taken together, have presented us with a most peculiar and difficult moral predicament.
BOOKS
January 15, 1995 | Daniel Harris, Daniel Harris' essays appear in Harper's and Salmagundi. He is writing a book on gay culture
The notorious career of one of France's most iconoclastic poets began, not with the controversial appearance in 1857 of "Les Fleurs du Mal"--which unleashed a fire storm of criticism and nearly a century of acrimonious litigation--but with an altogether less significant incident.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2007 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
A great medievalist once remarked that, in the end, Byzantine civilization failed because it was merely ingenious rather than original. Thanks to what we now call modernism, that can't be said of the Euro-American culture that has dominated the world for the last two centuries. Peter Gay is perhaps our leading historian of culture and ideas, and in "Modernism: The Lure of Heresy: From Baudelaire to Beckett and Beyond," he sets himself an interesting -- personally felt -- task.
BOOKS
July 1, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER ROBINSON, Christopher Robinson is professor of European literature at Oxford University and the author of several books, including "C.P. Cavafy" and "French Literature in the Twentieth Century."
It is an odd fact that poets tend to be either larger-than-life figures of rebellion, as Lord Byron and Allen Ginsberg were, or that they happen to lead lives of (at least outward) banal conformity: Mallarme the schoolmaster, Philip Larkin the librarian, Wallace Stevens the insurance man. Constantine P. Cavafy belonged firmly to the latter group.
BOOKS
April 26, 1998 | ROGER SHATTUCK, Roger Shattuck is the author of several books, including "The Banquet Years: The French Avant-Garde Before World War I," "Forbidden Knowledge" and "The Innocent Eye: On Modern Literature & the Arts." His essay is a revised version of the second annual Irving Howe Memorial Lecture, which he delivered at the Center for the Humanities, City University of New York
Twenty centuries ago, Horace in his brief and celebrated lines in "The Art of Poetry" suggested that art at its best fulfills a double purpose: to instruct and to delight. These two factors lived and worked together for centuries. Today, however, a third factor--art for art's sake--complicates the picture. We now have to deal with three positions that, taken together, have presented us with a most peculiar and difficult moral predicament.
BOOKS
January 15, 1995 | Daniel Harris, Daniel Harris' essays appear in Harper's and Salmagundi. He is writing a book on gay culture
The notorious career of one of France's most iconoclastic poets began, not with the controversial appearance in 1857 of "Les Fleurs du Mal"--which unleashed a fire storm of criticism and nearly a century of acrimonious litigation--but with an altogether less significant incident.
BOOKS
November 27, 1988 | Michael Palmer
A man undergoes pain sitting at a piano knowing thousands will die while he is playing He has two thoughts about this If he should stop they would be free of pain If he could get the notes right he would be free of pain In the second case the first thought would be erased causing pain It is this instance of playing he would say to himself my eyes have grown hollow like yours my head is enlarged though empty of thought Such thoughts destroy music and this at least is good From "Sun"
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | ROSS MILLER, Miller teaches English and American Studies at the University of Connecticut. He is a frequent contributor to the Book Review. and
Image and Word, the Interaction of 20th-Century Photography and Text by Jefferson Hunter (Harvard University Press: $25; 233 pages, illustrated) Photography has never been fully accepted as an art. People who wait in line to see a celebrated show of paintings, a dance concert or a visiting orchestra will more likely show you their slides of Europe than spend time in front of carefully printed and framed photographs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
I don't know that Baudelaire meant music in his poem "Invitation to the Voyage," when he thought of a world far away -- exotic, unobtainable, a land lost in love's gaze. "All is order there, and elegance," he wrote, "pleasure, peace and opulence." But I think he did. Music as an outpost of order, pleasure, peace and opulence kept Bartok and Stravinsky sane when their world was not. In 1936, with the Nazi takeover of Hungary inevitable, Bartok turned to fugues and the mathematical Fibonacci series for "Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta," one of his most magical scores.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2007 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
A great medievalist once remarked that, in the end, Byzantine civilization failed because it was merely ingenious rather than original. Thanks to what we now call modernism, that can't be said of the Euro-American culture that has dominated the world for the last two centuries. Peter Gay is perhaps our leading historian of culture and ideas, and in "Modernism: The Lure of Heresy: From Baudelaire to Beckett and Beyond," he sets himself an interesting -- personally felt -- task.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1986 | COLIN GARDNER
"Artificial Paradise" is the title of an eclectic group show that brings together artists as wide ranging as Robert Yarber, Michael McMillen and Llyn Foulkes in an attempt to explore some of the more painterly elements of that slippery "genre" called Neo-Surrealism. The title is taken from Baudelaire, although it has more to do with a 1985 German exhibition of the same name that examined painting and art collecting as a form of psychological and aesthetic escapism.
NEWS
March 21, 1985 | From Reuters
A first edition of "Les Fleurs du Mal" ("The Flowers of Evil") by Charles Baudelaire was sold for $130,000 at an auction of rare 19th-Century books Wednesday. The slim, handwritten volume of poetry was bought by Pierre Beres, a Parisian rare-book dealer.
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