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Bay Of Pigs Invasion

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tad Szulc, a distinguished foreign correspondent for the New York Times who broke the story of the Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961 and later wrote an important biography of Cuban leader Fidel Castro, died of cancer Monday at his home in Washington, D.C. He was 74. Szulc (pronounced Schulz) was diagnosed in 1999 with colon cancer, which spread to his liver and lungs. On March 25, he wrote in an article for Parade magazine about how the diagnosis "incurable cancer" gave him "a curious sense of calm."
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OPINION
May 9, 2011 | By Jim Rasenberger
It's plenty busy at the White House these days, but somebody should take a moment to light 50 candles in honor of the Situation Room, that suite in the West Wing basement that's as modest in dimension and decor as it is grand in historical significance. May marks the Situation Room's 50th birthday. Rooms are not usually given birthday parties, but if there's ever a time and place to make an exception, this is it. The "Sit Room," as insiders call it, has seen an extraordinary amount of drama over the last half a century.
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NEWS
December 14, 1991
Edward J. O'Donnell, 84, U.S. Navy admiral who commanded the Guantanamo, Cuba, base during the Cuban missile crisis and the Bay of Pigs invasion. The admiral became head of the Cuban base in December, 1960, when the United States and Cuba were about to begin diplomatic negotiations. Five months later, in April, 1961, O'Donnell led U.S. forces at the Cuban base in the covert Bay of Pigs invasion. Then, in October, 1962, President John F.
OPINION
April 19, 2011
Fifty years ago Tuesday, a ragtag army of Cuban exiles — recruited, trained and armed by the United States — was scrambling across the Playa Giron on the southern coast of Cuba, retreating under fire in the wake of a badly botched invasion. In Washington, the CIA officials who had planned the operation gathered around a radio to hear a final message from the brigade commander, who had been pleading all day for supplies and air cover. "Tanks are in sight," he said. "I have nothing left to fight with.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | From Associated Press
Richard M. Bissell Jr., a former deputy CIA director and principal architect of the Bay of Pigs invasion, the Kennedy Administration's failed attempt to topple Cuban leader Fidel Castro, has died. He was 84. He died Monday of heart failure, said his associate, Frances T. Pudlo. Bissell had been on track to succeed CIA Director Allen Dulles, but after the Bay of Pigs debacle in 1961, President John F. Kennedy told both they would have to resign.
NEWS
March 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Former Cold War adversaries strolled together Saturday along the beaches where an exile force suffered a disastrous defeat 40 years ago in the invasion known as the Bay of Pigs. Alfredo Duran, one of the exiles trained by the CIA, stared out at the water and said: "It is very emotional to be on this beach, where a lot of my friends died, where a lot of people died on the other side." More than 1,000 invaders were captured. An additional 100 invaders and 151 defenders died.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
A young Fidel Castro joked and swore as he barked out orders by telephone to defending troops at the Bay of Pigs 40 years ago, according to Cuban documents declassified this week at a conference bringing together former opponents in the battle. "I think that up to now you have been missing the party," Castro told his younger brother, Raul, who was far from the fighting the morning of April 17, 1961, shortly after the three-day invasion began.
OPINION
May 9, 2011 | By Jim Rasenberger
It's plenty busy at the White House these days, but somebody should take a moment to light 50 candles in honor of the Situation Room, that suite in the West Wing basement that's as modest in dimension and decor as it is grand in historical significance. May marks the Situation Room's 50th birthday. Rooms are not usually given birthday parties, but if there's ever a time and place to make an exception, this is it. The "Sit Room," as insiders call it, has seen an extraordinary amount of drama over the last half a century.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN and DOLLY MASCARENAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Thomas "Pete" Ray's B-26 bomber was shot down by Cuban antiaircraft batteries near Playa Giron on April 19, 1961, he wasn't there. So said the CIA. And for decades, the U.S. government publicly denied that a top-secret squadron of civilians recruited from the Alabama Air National Guard ever existed, let alone was on a CIA mission to bomb Cuba in one of the agency's best-kept and most humiliating secrets.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | Reuters
A U.S. Defense Department official said Monday that he had found two bodies believed to be those of anti-Castro Cuban pilots who crashed on their way to support the aborted 1961 invasion at the Bay of Pigs. Bradley Adams of the U.S. Army's Central Identification Laboratory told journalists that three weeks of excavation had uncovered human remains and personal effects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2010
Jyoti Basu Communist statesman of India Jyoti Basu, 95, a veteran communist leader who in 1996 came close to becoming India's prime minister, died Sunday in Calcutta of multiple organ failure, a party spokesman said. Basu became chief minister of West Bengal state in 1977 and served for 23 years, making him the longest-serving chief minister in India's political history. In 1996, a group of parties asked Basu to lead a coalition government in New Delhi. However, the Communist Party declined, saying it did not want to be part of a government in which it did not have a majority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2009 | Matt Schudel, Schudel writes for the Washington Post.
Milan C. "Mike" Miskovsky, a onetime CIA lawyer who quietly worked behind the scenes in high-profile prisoner negotiations and also investigated the causes of racial turmoil in the 1960s, died Oct. 15 of lung cancer at his home in Washington. He was 83. Miskovsky's varied career began when he was a forester in the western United States and took him to flash points of the Cold War and civil rights movement. He negotiated a prisoner exchange that freed U-2 spy plane pilot Francis Gary Powers and helped arrange the release of Cuban Americans captured during the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bernard Barker, a Cuban-born CIA operative who participated in the Bay of Pigs invasion and was later a Watergate burglar, died Friday in suburban Miami. He was 92. Barker died at his home after being taken to the Veterans Administration Medical Center on Thursday night, his stepdaughter, Kelly Andrad, told the Associated Press. He appeared to have died from complications of lung cancer, and he had also experienced heart problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tad Szulc, a distinguished foreign correspondent for the New York Times who broke the story of the Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961 and later wrote an important biography of Cuban leader Fidel Castro, died of cancer Monday at his home in Washington, D.C. He was 74. Szulc (pronounced Schulz) was diagnosed in 1999 with colon cancer, which spread to his liver and lungs. On March 25, he wrote in an article for Parade magazine about how the diagnosis "incurable cancer" gave him "a curious sense of calm."
NEWS
March 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Former Cold War adversaries strolled together Saturday along the beaches where an exile force suffered a disastrous defeat 40 years ago in the invasion known as the Bay of Pigs. Alfredo Duran, one of the exiles trained by the CIA, stared out at the water and said: "It is very emotional to be on this beach, where a lot of my friends died, where a lot of people died on the other side." More than 1,000 invaders were captured. An additional 100 invaders and 151 defenders died.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
A young Fidel Castro joked and swore as he barked out orders by telephone to defending troops at the Bay of Pigs 40 years ago, according to Cuban documents declassified this week at a conference bringing together former opponents in the battle. "I think that up to now you have been missing the party," Castro told his younger brother, Raul, who was far from the fighting the morning of April 17, 1961, shortly after the three-day invasion began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2010
Jyoti Basu Communist statesman of India Jyoti Basu, 95, a veteran communist leader who in 1996 came close to becoming India's prime minister, died Sunday in Calcutta of multiple organ failure, a party spokesman said. Basu became chief minister of West Bengal state in 1977 and served for 23 years, making him the longest-serving chief minister in India's political history. In 1996, a group of parties asked Basu to lead a coalition government in New Delhi. However, the Communist Party declined, saying it did not want to be part of a government in which it did not have a majority.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | Reuters
A U.S. Defense Department official said Monday that he had found two bodies believed to be those of anti-Castro Cuban pilots who crashed on their way to support the aborted 1961 invasion at the Bay of Pigs. Bradley Adams of the U.S. Army's Central Identification Laboratory told journalists that three weeks of excavation had uncovered human remains and personal effects.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN and DOLLY MASCARENAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Thomas "Pete" Ray's B-26 bomber was shot down by Cuban antiaircraft batteries near Playa Giron on April 19, 1961, he wasn't there. So said the CIA. And for decades, the U.S. government publicly denied that a top-secret squadron of civilians recruited from the Alabama Air National Guard ever existed, let alone was on a CIA mission to bomb Cuba in one of the agency's best-kept and most humiliating secrets.
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