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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The BBC Symphony is not one of the world's top five orchestras, but it doesn't matter. It plays clean, it plays straight, it plays with commitment. Give it a hall with as immediate and bright an acoustic as in the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts--where it performed two different programs over the weekend--and count on every detail being heard. Every one: from the hovering glints off tiny antique cymbals in Debussy to the monster fortissimos in Berlioz.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
That rare breed, a viola concerto, showed off the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the acoustic of the Walt Disney Concert Hall about as well as Mussorgsky's mighty "Pictures at an Exhibition" did in a three-part program Thursday. Esa-Pekka Salonen led the U.S. premiere of Brett Dean's Viola Concerto, a work co-commissioned by the Philharmonic, the BBC Symphony, Symphony Australia and the Sydney Symphony. The BBC Symphony led by Rumon Gamba gave the world premiere in April 2005.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2002 | Chris Pasles
The BBC Symphony, scheduled to play Orange County on March 7 and 9, 2003, has canceled its U.S. tour. Subscribers to these concerts, sponsored by the Philharmonic Society, will be contacted regarding their ticket options. The Philharmonic Society has also added two concerts for the 2002-2003 season. Both will be at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. Pianist Zoltan Koscis will play Liszt's Concerto No. 1 with the Hungarian National Philharmonic on Jan. 24.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
"What are you here for?" the immigration official at Gatwick Airport asked. On my landing card, I had written "journalist" as my occupation, and I told him I was a music critic and would report on the BBC Symphony's annual "Composer Weekend" at the Barbican. "You don't mean to say that you've come all this way for four minutes and 32 seconds of silence?" "Actually, it's four minutes and 33 seconds," I corrected.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
"What are you here for?" the immigration official at Gatwick Airport asked. On my landing card, I had written "journalist" as my occupation, and I told him I was a music critic and would report on the BBC Symphony's annual "Composer Weekend" at the Barbican. "You don't mean to say that you've come all this way for four minutes and 32 seconds of silence?" "Actually, it's four minutes and 33 seconds," I corrected.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
That rare breed, a viola concerto, showed off the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the acoustic of the Walt Disney Concert Hall about as well as Mussorgsky's mighty "Pictures at an Exhibition" did in a three-part program Thursday. Esa-Pekka Salonen led the U.S. premiere of Brett Dean's Viola Concerto, a work co-commissioned by the Philharmonic, the BBC Symphony, Symphony Australia and the Sydney Symphony. The BBC Symphony led by Rumon Gamba gave the world premiere in April 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1998 | Timothy Mangan
Hyperion's Romantic Piano Concerto series has highlighted some viable alternatives to the never-ending rehash of Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff concertos. This 18th volume features Korngold's Left-Hand Concerto, written for one-armed pianist Paul Wittgenstein. A strenuous, Straussian affair, full of sugar and sweep, saturated harmonies and instrumental hyperactivity, it leaves you wondering what all its fuss is about--is there an unstated lurid scenario?--but it never bores.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long before they reached Section 101, Row 8 of Staples Center on Wednesday afternoon, Grammy nominees Alistair Beattie and Barry Deacon realized they faced certain disadvantages in their quest for glory. Their band could offer no wicked backbeat, for instance, and there were no drop-dead beautiful bodies on their videos. There had been no promotional campaign to speak of, and for that matter, precious few actual record sales. Beattie and Deacon did, however, have kilts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2000 | MARK SWED
There is no love lost between Ned Rorem and Elliott Carter. Rorem contends in his provocative diaries that he can't make heads or tails of the "crusty cerebrality" of, say, Carter's Third String Quartet. And Carter, the master of complexity, apparently couldn't care less about the beguiling (and often deceptive) simplicity of Rorem's songs. At one point in his "Nantucket Diary," Rorem grumbles that in all their meetings over more than 30 years, "[Carter has] never asked me beans about myself."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2002
Class of 2002 Berlin Philharmonic ...Simon Rattle New York Philharmonic...Lorin Maazel Royal Opera, London...Antonio Pappano Cleveland Orchestra...Franz Welser-Most Bournemouth Symphony, England...Marin Alsop French National Orchestra, Paris...Kurt Masur Vienna State Opera...Seiji Ozawa Oslo Philharmonic...Andre Previn La Monnaie, Brussels...Kazushi Ono Coming soon Philadelphia Orchestra...Christoph Eschenbach (2003) Boston Symphony...James Levine (2004) Minneapolis Orchestra...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2002 | Chris Pasles
The BBC Symphony, scheduled to play Orange County on March 7 and 9, 2003, has canceled its U.S. tour. Subscribers to these concerts, sponsored by the Philharmonic Society, will be contacted regarding their ticket options. The Philharmonic Society has also added two concerts for the 2002-2003 season. Both will be at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. Pianist Zoltan Koscis will play Liszt's Concerto No. 1 with the Hungarian National Philharmonic on Jan. 24.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long before they reached Section 101, Row 8 of Staples Center on Wednesday afternoon, Grammy nominees Alistair Beattie and Barry Deacon realized they faced certain disadvantages in their quest for glory. Their band could offer no wicked backbeat, for instance, and there were no drop-dead beautiful bodies on their videos. There had been no promotional campaign to speak of, and for that matter, precious few actual record sales. Beattie and Deacon did, however, have kilts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2000 | MARK SWED
There is no love lost between Ned Rorem and Elliott Carter. Rorem contends in his provocative diaries that he can't make heads or tails of the "crusty cerebrality" of, say, Carter's Third String Quartet. And Carter, the master of complexity, apparently couldn't care less about the beguiling (and often deceptive) simplicity of Rorem's songs. At one point in his "Nantucket Diary," Rorem grumbles that in all their meetings over more than 30 years, "[Carter has] never asked me beans about myself."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1998 | Timothy Mangan
Hyperion's Romantic Piano Concerto series has highlighted some viable alternatives to the never-ending rehash of Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff concertos. This 18th volume features Korngold's Left-Hand Concerto, written for one-armed pianist Paul Wittgenstein. A strenuous, Straussian affair, full of sugar and sweep, saturated harmonies and instrumental hyperactivity, it leaves you wondering what all its fuss is about--is there an unstated lurid scenario?--but it never bores.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The BBC Symphony is not one of the world's top five orchestras, but it doesn't matter. It plays clean, it plays straight, it plays with commitment. Give it a hall with as immediate and bright an acoustic as in the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts--where it performed two different programs over the weekend--and count on every detail being heard. Every one: from the hovering glints off tiny antique cymbals in Debussy to the monster fortissimos in Berlioz.
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