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Beak

NEWS
June 28, 1987
His boat festooned with feathered friends, Zhang Laosi drifts lazily down a river on the outskirts of Beijing, bringing a bit a rural fisherman's life to the city. The sight of Zhang and his fishing birds, cormorants, is rare in busy Beijing, but it is common in rural China. Zhang and thousands of other rural fishermen still use cormorants to do their fishing. The birds dive gracefully into the water, snatch up fish and return them to the boats.
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MAGAZINE
January 13, 1991 | JACK SMITH
MY WIFE'S COCKATIEL died the other day. I don't know how old he was, but he seems to have been around almost as long as I have. I don't know what sex it was, but I always thought of it as a he, possibly because he was aggressive, mean-spirited and shrewish. If anyone thinks that only females can be shrewish, I suggest that person is being sexist. Males make the worst shrews. I had almost no contact with the bird. He stayed in his cage, I stayed in mine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1989 | GEORGE FRANK, Times Staff Writer
Loren Hays had been in bed for hours when most people were just starting to celebrate New Year's Eve. His sleep was important. He got up in the darkness Sunday morning, made his way toward the coastal wetlands and waited for the sun to rise so he could look through a telescope and spot such species as the double-crested cormorant, northern shoveler, blue-winged teal, common loon and the long-billed dowitcher.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | ESTHER SCHRADER, Times Staff Writer
The owner of the 50-foot boulder from which the community of Eagle Rock gets its name said this week that he is negotiating with Los Angeles officials who want to buy the rock and the land around it for a park. But the owner's cooperation may not signal the end to a yearlong battle waged by city officials and Eagle Rock residents to block development near the historic rock.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999 | From Associated Press
It looked like a dolphin, but it was a 1,000-pound beaked whale that beached itself Friday in Malibu, setting off an extensive rescue operation that ended with her transport to a center with a portable pool for marine mammals. Lifeguards at Point Dume County Beach spotted the whale attempting to beach herself early Friday afternoon, said lifeguard Capt. Steve Moseley.
BOOKS
November 13, 1994 | CAROL J. LONSDALE and HARDING E. SMITH, Carol Lonsdale is a research scientist at Caltech. Harding Smith is a professor of physics at UC San Diego. They were 1994 science book prize judges
Charles Darwin never imagined that it would be possible to observe the effects of natural selection during a human lifetime, let alone in the mere span of a few years. The theory that took seed with his foraging and collecting in the Galapagos Archipelago was thought by this scientific visionary to be a matter of centuries, with the evidence to be found in the fossil record and the diversity of living forms. Most people today still assume that this is the case.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1990 | DON KENDALL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
No country is ready to knock the United States from its roost as the world's top poultry producer. But in the global game of chicken there is a beak-to-beak race to see who is the most efficient. Efficiency can translate into profits for producers and lower prices for consumers. Efficiency also is a big factor in one country's having an export advantage over another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers working in China say they have found the remains of the first bird with a beak, and the discovery could point the way to the earliest bird of all. They named the bird Confuciusornis sanctus , after the ancient Chinese philosopher, and said its remains provided the first evidence of a bird covered with true feathers.
SCIENCE
July 25, 2009 | Shara Yurkiewicz
The toucan's enlarged bill may not just be for attracting mates or handling food, as biologists have speculated. It also may be able to exchange heat with its environment, enabling the bird to adjust its body temperature as its surroundings change.
SCIENCE
March 29, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The razor-sharp beaks that giant squids use to attack might one day lead to improved artificial limbs for people. That deadly beak has long puzzled scientists, who wondered how a creature without any bones could wield it without hurting itself. Researchers at UC Santa Barbara reported Friday in the journal Science that they have an explanation.
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