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Beale S Cut

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1992
The city of Santa Clarita and a landowner are seeking to have a famous pioneer pass known as Beale's Cut designated as a state historical landmark. The cut is a narrow, 90-foot-deep gash in the rocky pass that separates the Santa Clarita and San Fernando valleys. Excavated in 1862 by U. S. Army Lt. Edward Fitzgerald Beale, it opened trade between Los Angeles and the north and was the only convenient passageway connecting the two regions for years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was cut from the earth with picks and shovels and bare hands, a triumph of human endurance and engineering over sheer geology. But today, Beale's Cut, the historic mountain pass between the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys, is a third full of mud and rock, thanks to El Nino-powered storms, and has been rendered impassable once more. Who will reclaim this legendary site? Not the city of Santa Clarita, arguably made possible in the 20th century because of the foresight of U.S. Army Lt.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1997 | STEVE PADILLA
Until Edward Fitzgerald Beale came along, there was no good way to cross the mountains separating the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys. Most travelers used old Indian trails. Stagecoaches and wagons were raised and lowered using ropes and pulleys. Then in 1862, under Beale's direction, U.S. soldiers swinging picks and shovels dug a 90-foot-deep, 240-foot-long gash in the mountains. It was only 13 feet across, but it was enough. The traffic began to flow, opening the Valley to parts north.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1997 | STEVE PADILLA
Until Edward Fitzgerald Beale came along, there was no good way to cross the mountains separating the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys. Most travelers used old Indian trails. Stagecoaches and wagons were raised and lowered using ropes and pulleys. Then in 1862, under Beale's direction, U.S. soldiers swinging picks and shovels dug a 90-foot-deep, 240-foot-long gash in the mountains. It was only 13 feet across, but it was enough. The traffic began to flow, opening the Valley to parts north.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Developers of a proposed 117-acre office park on the site of a former oil refinery and historic travel route expect approval today of the project by the Planning Commission. The Valley Gateway project, which is south of the intersection of Sierra Highway and San Fernando Road, is to include 860,000 square feet of office space. Developers predict that the complex will provide Santa Clarita with 2,500 jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was cut from the earth with picks and shovels and bare hands, a triumph of human endurance and engineering over sheer geology. But today, Beale's Cut, the historic mountain pass between the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys, is a third full of mud and rock, thanks to El Nino-powered storms, and has been rendered impassable once more. Who will reclaim this legendary site? Not the city of Santa Clarita, arguably made possible in the 20th century because of the foresight of U.S. Army Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Developers of a proposed 117-acre office park on the site of a former oil refinery and historic travel route expect approval today of the project by the Planning Commission. The Valley Gateway project, which is south of the intersection of Sierra Highway and San Fernando Road, is to include 860,000 square feet of office space. Developers predict that the complex will provide Santa Clarita with 2,500 jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1992
The city of Santa Clarita and a landowner are seeking to have a famous pioneer pass known as Beale's Cut designated as a state historical landmark. The cut is a narrow, 90-foot-deep gash in the rocky pass that separates the Santa Clarita and San Fernando valleys. Excavated in 1862 by U. S. Army Lt. Edward Fitzgerald Beale, it opened trade between Los Angeles and the north and was the only convenient passageway connecting the two regions for years.
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