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August 4, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was George Harrison--the quiet, but not-oblivious-to-trademark-law Beatle--who in 1980 first noticed the potential for conflict. Leafing through a British magazine, Harrison saw an ad for an Apple Computer Inc. retailer. So the composer of the "Sue Me, Sue You, Blues" quickly rang up the trademark agents at the Beatles' company, Apple Corps Ltd., and asked them to investigate. The two firms have been at odds over the name they share almost since--most recently in a London courtroom.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009
Beatlemania: A 1966 magazine signed by John Lennon containing his remark that the Beatles were more popular than Jesus has sold at auction for $12,713. The buyer was a New York surgeon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1995 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
After the breakup of the Beatles in 1970, Paul McCartney thought of naming his first album "I'm the One It Hit the Most," because he was so devastated by the split. Today, however, he looks back with affection on the Beatles years and their legacy. In a phone interview, he spoke about returning to the studio with rock's greatest band, but why we shouldn't expect a tour. * Question: What was it like, emotionally, going back into the studio with George and Ringo?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007 | Randy Lewis
Paul McCartney tells Billboard.com that he's "pretty sure" the Beatles catalog will finally be available online in 2008. "The whole thing is primed, ready to go," he's quoted as saying on the magazine's website. "It's down to fine-tuning, but I'm pretty sure it'll be happening next year." The long-awaited move has been expected after the arrival of each of the Fab Four's solo catalog's went online this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first Orange County-bred rock star to sing and play on the stage of the Orange County Performing Arts Center will be . . . George Harrison. At least that's the alias Jim Owen will be singing and playing under Saturday. Since his teens, this 30-year-old Westminster resident has been earning his living impersonating the quiet Beatle as a cast member in "Beatlemania" and other touring tributes to the Fab Four.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2007 | James Marcus, Special to The Times
From the very beginning of their career, the Beatles have proved an irresistible temptation for biographers. The first substantial book about them, Michael Braun's "Love Me Do," appeared in 1964 -- just a year after the group's initial conquest of the United Kingdom with "Please Please Me."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2001 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Before Jessie Nelson began work on "I Am Sam," a wrenching drama due at Christmas that stars Sean Penn as a mentally handicapped father battling to keep custody of his 7-year-old daughter, the writer-director spent several months at the L.A. Goal center for people with disabilities in Culver City. It didn't take long for Nelson to notice something the center's residents had in common: Nearly everybody was a huge Beatles fan.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, Chris Willman is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
Like the character in the old Steely Dan song who has to tell his younger lover, "Hey, 19, that's 'Retha Franklin," one invariably feels one's age explaining to teen-agers and even some young adults that "Yesterday" wasn't always elevator music, and that Ringo Starr was in a rock band before he landed that gig playing the miniature train conductor on a Saturday morning kids' show.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1995
Most portentous Beatles-related coincidence: The group's album, "With the Beatles," was released in England on Nov. 22, 1963--the same day that President Kennedy was assassinated. * Most macabre misreporting of a Beatle malady by the press: The BBC reported in 1964 that Ringo Starr had his toenails removed. In fact, the extricated anatomy in question was Ringo's tonsils.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1995 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop critic
Rock 'n' roll, each generation reminds us, is meant to be irreverent--suspicious, if not downright scornful, of anything handed down from earlier decades. The goal with each passing of the torch is to reject, discover and liberate. So why do the Beatles remain the most revered attraction in rock after three decades? "The television event of a lifetime . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2007 | James Marcus, Special to The Times
From the very beginning of their career, the Beatles have proved an irresistible temptation for biographers. The first substantial book about them, Michael Braun's "Love Me Do," appeared in 1964 -- just a year after the group's initial conquest of the United Kingdom with "Please Please Me."
BUSINESS
October 10, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Apple Inc.'s iTunes began selling nine albums from the late George Harrison, the last of the four Beatles to have his solo work added to the online music store. The albums, including "All Things Must Pass," went on sale Tuesday, Apple said. This year, the Cupertino, Calif.-based company added solo music from former Beatles Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and the late John Lennon. ITunes, the most popular online music store, still lacks songs from the Beatles as a group.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A monument to the Beatles will be built in Hamburg, Germany, where the Fab Four launched their international career 45 years ago. Radio station Oldie 95, the organizer, says the $625,000 steel monument will be built on a corner of the St. Pauli district near clubs where the Beatles played songs such as "Love Me Do" in 1962. The monument will represent Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison, Ringo Starr and early Beatle Stuart Sutcliffe, who died in Hamburg in 1962, the radio station said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Apple Corps, guardian of the Beatles' commercial interests, said Tuesday its chief executive, a longtime friend of the Fab Four, has quit. Neil Aspinall, a school friend of Sir Paul McCartney and George Harrison, was the band's first road manager and would drive them between gigs in his van. He later became their personal assistant and in 1968 was given a management role at Apple Records, the band's record label.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2007 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
The long and winding road that would allow music lovers to finally meet the Beatles via digital downloads still has a few miles to go despite a copyright settlement Monday that raised hopes it would happen soon. Although the Beatles' Apple Corps record label made peace with computer and digital media company Apple Inc. over their uses of the fruit as a logo, there are hurdles to clear before "Maxwell's Silver Hammer" can be purchased on iTunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2006 | From Reuters
The Beatles are set to appear on British postage stamps for the first time. Some 37 years after the world's most famous pop group broke up, Britain's Royal Mail will release a set of six stamps on Jan. 9 depicting iconic Beatles' album covers. The stamps "celebrate the Beatles' extraordinary cultural contribution to Britain," the Royal Mail said. The featured albums are "With the Beatles," "Help!," "Revolver," "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band," "Abbey Road" and "Let It Be."
BUSINESS
February 22, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
The music of the '80s is striking a sour note with the leading rock stars of the '60s. Apple Records, the recording company created more than two decades ago by and for the Beatles--yes, John, Paul, George and Ringo--is suing Apple Computer, the darling of the Silicon Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1999 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Well I guess it ain't easy doing nothing at all but hey man free rides just don't come along every day." --"Why Don't You Get a Job?" by the Offspring * In its hit song "Why Don't You Get a Job?," the Offspring chide slackers who sit back and let others do the work. But some music critics say the rock group is committing that very same sin with the tune.
NEWS
December 28, 2006 | From the Associated Press
An album cover signed by all four Beatles as a gift for George Harrison's sister has sold at auction for $115,228.82. The sale, to an unidentified buyer, was believed to set a record price for a signed Beatles album purchased at a public sale, said Mark Zakarin, president of the online auction company It's Only Rock 'N Roll (www.itsonlyrocknroll.com). The copy of "Meet the Beatles," the band's first U.S. release on Capitol Records, was put up for sale by Harrison's sister, Louise.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2006 | Randy Lewis
If it's true that you can't go home again, the Beatles are proving that you can come close. After a two-month hiatus, the long-running "Breakfast With the Beatles" radio program returns to L.A. airwaves starting Nov. 26 at a new home, KLOS-FM (95.5), next door on the dial to where it originated in 1983 on now-defunct KMET-FM (94.7) Host Chris Carter said Thursday that the show, mothballed in September from KLSX-FM (97.1), will resume broadcasting Sunday mornings.
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