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NEWS
May 14, 2000 | Reuters
Two gates stolen from a Liverpool children's home immortalized in the Beatles song "Strawberry Fields Forever" have been recovered from a scrap metal yard, British police said Saturday. They were found a day after two thieves cut them down and loaded them into a van in full view of children playing on the Salvation Army home's grounds. The wrought-iron gates, which are 8 feet high and 10 feet wide, have now been returned to the home, near where the song's writer John Lennon grew up.
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NEWS
April 3, 2000 | From Associated Press
Thirty years after they went their own ways, the three surviving Beatles have written a book setting the record straight about the "Fab Four," Paul McCartney's spokesman said Sunday. McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr have spent six years writing the 360-page "Beatles Anthology," to be published in Britain and the United States in the fall. The book will provide the frankest account of how the band ruled the pop world in the 1960s.
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Beatles lead guitarist George Harrison was stabbed in the chest as he fought off a knife-wielding intruder at his heavily secured mansion before dawn Thursday. In a disturbing echo of the assassination of bandmate John Lennon 19 years ago, the attack appeared to be the act of someone obsessed with the group.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1999 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Well I guess it ain't easy doing nothing at all but hey man free rides just don't come along every day." --"Why Don't You Get a Job?" by the Offspring * In its hit song "Why Don't You Get a Job?," the Offspring chide slackers who sit back and let others do the work. But some music critics say the rock group is committing that very same sin with the tune.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1997 | From Reuters
Former Beatle Sir Paul McCartney says that singer Bob Dylan introduced him to marijuana in the 1960s and that he then did the same for Rolling Stone Mick Jagger. McCartney also claims to have played the dominant role in his songwriting partnership with the late John Lennon, according to a new authorized biography. The book by Barry Miles, serialized in the Sunday edition of the newspaper the Observer, is based on hours of interviews with McCartney.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1997 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Be careful who you pretend to be because one day you may wake up to find that's who you are. --Ward Cleaver * Pretending is a big thing in rock 'n' roll. Most groups at least pretend to be cool, and increasingly, many bands even pretend to be somebody else. These so-called tribute bands are everywhere, and according to John Cuda of Barra Cuda Productions, there are more than 100 tribute bands nationwide and about 40 in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1997 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Don Bellezzo, a member of the band "Yesterday," walks out on a concert stage these days, decked out in the costume and haircut of John Lennon circa 1967, the audience reaction is not, initially, ecstatic screaming as was the case at real Beatles concerts in the '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1997 | DON HECKMAN
The association between Ravi Shankar and George Harrison dates back more than three decades, to their meeting in 1966 in London. Shankar, now 76, was already a much honored artist at the time, one who had toured Europe and the United States, recorded widely and composed music for films. But the connection with Harrison, the lead guitar in the enormously popular Beatles, gave him a kind of instant recognizability with the then-emerging boomer generation.
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | From Reuters
The original birth certificate of Sir Paul McCartney sold for $84,146, but it was a hard day's night after that on Saturday in the biggest-ever auction of Beatles memorabilia. In a sale marked by controversy and failure to meet hopes of world-record prices, bidders in Tokyo and London snapped up small mementos of the Fab Four but signaled that the Liverpool Lads' comeback in pop charts did not extend to the auction circuit.
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