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Beauty Contests

NEWS
May 7, 1989 | RICK HOLGUIN, Times Staff Writer
The 3-year-old beauty queen was on the living room floor, her eyes fixed on the television screen as a videotape of her victories rolled. When it ended, Brandi Nichele Alvarez rose with a smile and walked across the room. Because she is shy and young, she did not talk about the two beauty contests she has won, nor did she mention the six- and seven-foot trophies, the $75, the rabbit fur coat, the six-inch television set, several decorative crowns and the "Talking Mother Goose." She has also won the right to compete for the Miss American Beauty Pageants' national title this summer in Las Vegas.
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NEWS
November 25, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If China boasts the world's fleetest female swimmers, France the most select of vintages and Ukraine the greatest pole vaulter, where do the world's most comely women come from? From India, of course. It's as official as these kinds of things ever get. This year, anyway. Last Saturday, Aishwarya Rai, 21, an architecture student with gray-green eyes from Bombay, bested contestants from 86 other countries to become Miss World 1994.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
"Oh, my God," blurted 80-year-old Teresa Segura from her wheelchair, "I can't walk, I can't see, and now I've won a beauty contest. Unbelievable. Babalu! Bombs away!" Almost as excited was runner-up Maude Burton, 100, who said she had so much fun that she might "give it another shot next year."
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 13 women competing in the statewide pageant--they don't say "beauty contests" anymore--strutted their stuff in the requisite evening gown competition. And they sang, danced and played musical instruments in the requisite talent competition. They fussed over one another backstage like a gaggle of sorority sisters to get their hair and makeup just right. And they rated the competition. "Boy," whispered one contestant. "Look at her legs!"
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | United Press International
A former dairy princess was sentenced Friday to life in prison, without possibility of parole until 2003, for strangling a former homecoming queen in a jealous rage over a farmer whom both women loved. Lori Esker, 21, was convicted in June of first-degree intentional homicide for the September, 1989, slaying of Lisa Cihaski, 21, who was strangled with a belt in a car outside of a Wausau area motel.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L.A. is not The Place for beauty queens these days. Heads don't always turn when they walk by, agents don't necessarily return their calls, no one is dying to turn them into movie stars or TV talk-show hostesses. Miss USA can't even get a guest shot on her favorite talk show. "Arsenio, are you listening?" asks Gretchen Polhemus as she coils her sinuous, six-foot body toward a reporter's tape recorder, in the hope that her plea will reach Arsenio Hall. But it probably won't--and she knows it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2004 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
Orange County might seem a little less talented, a bit less articulate and a lot less cute this weekend, when 12 local women will be in Fresno competing for the title of Miss California. Miss Placentia, a pianist and aspiring professional snowboarder, will be there. So will Miss Orange County, a hard-of-hearing woman who hopes to use the title to empower the disabled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times Frank Godden, who played a significant role in the development of Val Verde, a secluded and long-closed local resort community known as "the black Palm Springs," has died. He was 101. Godden, who had cancer, died Aug. 3 at his Los Angeles home, his family announced. Val Verde was founded in 1924 in the Santa Clarita Valley at a time when the region's black citizens were barred from beaches, parks and other attractions because of the color of their skin. There they could escape racism, if only for a weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2006 | Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writer
It is not a response Justin Rudd expects from a would-be Miss America. But as he coaches Miss Nevada in his Long Beach living room, asking her mock pageant questions about cosmetic surgery and her diet of chicken fingers and fries, he is unfazed by this potential misstep: "What," Rudd asks Crystal Wosik, "do you dislike most about yourself?" Miss Nevada does not pause. "My back fat." Rudd gives no grimace. "And my nose," she goes on. Rudd doesn't blink.
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