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Beauty Contests

NEWS
January 13, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Girls in Colombia dream of growing up to be queen. They imagine hearing their names being called and walking down the runway to be crowned queen of rice, queen of the sea, queen for a harvest or a day. "Every girl wants to be queen, even if it's queen of the house," quips Angie Melissa Arbelaez, Miss Choco 1997. "It's very obsessive here," says anthropologist Maria Victoria Uribe, Miss Bogota 1968. "There are more beauty contests here. . . . There are millions of queens."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1998 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
She's tall, she's blond, she's smart--and now that she's royalty, Christina Leanne Farrell won't have to walk. The 17-year-old senior was named the 81st Rose Queen on Tuesday and will reign over the last Rose Parade of the 20th century atop a float. Last year, Farrell walked the parade in the Arcadia High School marching band. "I'm just really shocked. It's so overwhelming," said Farrell, a National Honor Society member. "I first decided I wanted to be queen when I was 5."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 18-year-old Arcadia High School senior who plans to study history in college was chosen Tuesday as queen of the 105th Rose Parade, emerging from a field of seven finalists. When her name was announced in ceremonies at tournament headquarters in Pasadena, Erica Beth Brynes huddled emotionally for a minute with her six princesses. Then, straightening her tiara, she accepted a bouquet of roses and stood gamely at attention for a battalion of photographers and television cameras.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | From Associated Press
Miss Hawaii, Carolyn Suzanne Sapp, was crowned Miss America early today. Sapp smiled, wept and then knelt to receive her crown before walking down the runway waving to the crowd, blowing kisses and at one point pumping her fist in victory. Sapp, 24, of Honolulu, is the first contestant from her state to become Miss America. Miss New York, Marisol Montalvo, 23, of Holbrook, was first runner-up.
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-four young women in white shorts, red tops and white high heels rehearse a musical number in the lunchroom of Shively Elementary School. The dance begins well enough but soon deteriorates into a mess of missteps, confusion and laughter. "Girls!" The voice comes from choreographer Lynne Ashway. "We have one more week to pageant," she says in the slow but forceful tone of a fifth-grade teacher--which she is. "It's getting kind of panicky, isn't it?
SPORTS
January 2, 1994 | KIRBY LEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a lot of pain in hopes of financial gain, but the investment is worth it for Kelly McColgan, who has dreams of pursuing a career in modeling after appearing in Playboy and Swimwear Illustrated. McColgan, a 25-year-old Hermosa Beach resident, devotes an hour a day to aerobics and lifts weights five to six days a week. The payoff may come this month, when McColgan will be among a field of 175 contestants from 10 countries competing in the $100,000 Miss Galaxy contest in Kissimmee, Fla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1994 | CYNTHIA WALKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 17-year-old high school senior from San Marino who plans to study history in college was chosen Tuesday as queen of the 106th Tournament of Roses parade. * Waiting nervously as a drum roll sounded in the background, Aliya Haque trembled when her name was announced in ceremonies at tournament headquarters in Pasadena. The six other finalists, wearing royal blue dresses and black pumps, besieged her with hugs and kisses as her family shrieked from the sidelines.
WORLD
May 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
With dreadlocks down to below her hips, the first Rastafarian to win the Miss Jamaica title is out to break the stereotype that Rastas are interested only in reggae and marijuana. Zahra Redwood, 25, will represent Jamaica in the Miss Universe pageant. The country's minority Rastafarians worship the late Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie as a god they call "Jah." "Not all Rastafarians smoke" marijuana, said Redwood, who holds a degree in biotechnology and zoology.
WORLD
November 23, 2002 | Davan Maharaj, Times Staff Writer
The Miss World beauty pageant was supposed to put this country, which its own Nobel laureate, Wole Soyinka, has called the "open sore" of the African continent, on the tourism map. "We are overjoyed that these angels are in our midst," Fatima Garbati, who heads a trade group of Nigerian tour operators, said when the contestants arrived this month. "They are going to show the world that Nigeria is safe for tourists and investments." That wasn't to be.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1993 | PHUONG LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She grew up in Southern California and considers herself to be a typical teen-ager. Her life is filled with cheerleading practices, shopping treks, late-night phone calls and weekend activities with friends. Her parents are Vietnamese refugees who fled to the United States around the 1975 fall of Saigon. Homesick for their country, they gave her the Vietnamese name Hoai Huong, which means "look homeward."
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