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TRAVEL
September 16, 2012 | By Millie Ball
"What's that?" Visitors often ask that in New Orleans, which is a trove of unexpected juxtapositions. Just steps off the French Quarter's raunchy Bourbon Street, for instance, is the stately Hermann-Grima House, a Federal-style brick mansion with French Louisiana balconies and galleries. Ring the doorbell. Why it's a treasure: The Hermann-Grima House, named after two early owners, is an interpretation of a wealthy New Orleanian's home between 1830 and 1860. Carpets were made on an 1830s loom; furniture is typical of the era. Each October, the house is draped in mourning for a funeral.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1992
Karen Ingram, Coordinator, Conejo Valley Winter Shelter I think the numbers speak for themselves. Obviously, if we're only providing a couple hundred seasonal beds and we've got a couple thousand homeless we're not addressing the total needs of the community. If there were but year-round facilities that were available to meet the needs, that would certainly eliminate the need for the temporary programs. But you've got to address some of the underlying causes of homelessness, you can't just build a shelter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Of the three county-run hospitals with emergency rooms, Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center is the only one too small to meet patient demand, according to an independent draft report prepared for the Board of Supervisors. At least 97 new beds already are needed at the $1.02-billion hospital that opened less than two years ago, according to the report. In contrast, the report obtained by the Los Angeles Times found that the county's two other hospitals with emergency rooms have the space, but not the money, to add additional beds to meet patient demand.
HEALTH
September 5, 2011 | By Danielle Ofri, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"It's gonna be a big one," one of the nurses said in a dry, blasé voice, as she walked down the clinic hall. "Plane just hit one of the twin towers. They'll be coming in droves. " Her tone was the nearly bored resignation of someone who's worked in a city hospital for years and who's seen it all: Bellevue Hospital, after all, is the quintessential municipal hospital — huge emergency room, Level 1 trauma center, recipient of New York City's urban fallout for 275 years. Another plane crash, or train wreck, or gunfight, typically elicits not much more than a "Here we go again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
A wall-mounted computer screen in the call center at L.A. County/USC Medical Center showed the emergency room was full. Ambulances were supposed to take patients elsewhere on this Friday night. But they kept coming — some because it was the closest ER, others because the injuries were so severe only a trauma center could handle them. "We get them from outside hospitals, from clinics, from the field, from the jail, from police, from everywhere — everywhere," said Alma Aviles, a nurse supervisor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
A man hearing voices walked into the emergency room of downtown's California Hospital Medical Center on a recent night and said he wanted to hurt somebody. Doctors gave him medication, put him in a hospital bed and called the Los Angeles County Mental Health Department. A mental health worker placed the patient — who had a history of schizophrenia — on a psychiatric hold. But despite multiple attempts to find somewhere to treat him, he spent 3 1/2 days in the emergency room. With a sharp decrease in psychiatric beds and with mental health staffs spread thin across the state, emergency rooms increasingly have become costly and ineffective baby-sitting services for mentally disturbed patients in crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
The psychiatric emergency services at two county-run hospitals are so overcrowded that mentally ill patients have to sleep on mattresses on the floor, health officials acknowledged this week. The packed conditions at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center and Harbor-UCLA Medical Center make it more difficult to de-escalate the emotions of patients who arrive at the hospital agitated and anxious, said Christina Ghaly, deputy director of strategic planning for the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2011 | By Tiffany Kelly, Los Angeles Times
Huntington Hospital is more than halfway done with an expansion of its emergency department as it seeks to keep pace with rising demand for emergency room services. The Pasadena hospital's emergency and trauma center has 21 beds. The new center will add 22,000 square feet and contain 50 beds. The $80-million expansion was fueled by several factors that have increased activity at Huntington's emergency room. The first came in 2002, when Pasadena's St. Luke Medical Center closed, making Huntington the hub for 90% of 911 calls in the area.
NEWS
March 24, 1985 | JANICE MALL
When the Aviva Respite Shelter opens in the San Fernando Valley this week, it will be the first shelter of its kind in the Valley and the first short-term crisis shelter in Los Angeles exclusively for girls. It will also be a finger in the dike. It will add six beds to the existing 26 crisis shelter beds for the estimated 10,000 to 20,000 homeless and runaway young people in Los Angeles County, according to shelter director Carlyn Lambert.
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