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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1999 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the Orange County Sheriff's Department, it's 384 down, 4,616 to go. The first major expansion of the county's overcrowded jail system since the 1994 bankruptcy was unveiled Friday with a brand-new building at Theo Lacy Branch Jail in Orange. The modest increase in the number of beds fills only a small portion of the need, estimated at 5,000 more beds over the next 10 years. But officials hailed the new facilities as the first step in solving the space crunch.
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TRAVEL
September 16, 2012 | By Millie Ball
"What's that?" Visitors often ask that in New Orleans, which is a trove of unexpected juxtapositions. Just steps off the French Quarter's raunchy Bourbon Street, for instance, is the stately Hermann-Grima House, a Federal-style brick mansion with French Louisiana balconies and galleries. Ring the doorbell. Why it's a treasure: The Hermann-Grima House, named after two early owners, is an interpretation of a wealthy New Orleanian's home between 1830 and 1860. Carpets were made on an 1830s loom; furniture is typical of the era. Each October, the house is draped in mourning for a funeral.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1994 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A 10% tax slapped onto motel rooms here has come under fire from merchants who say it is driving business to nearby Lancaster, where similar rooms cost less. In Palmdale, the price of a basic $50-a-night motel room jumps to $55 because of the bed tax. Just a few miles north, in Lancaster, a similar room costs $53.50. Few weary travelers will decide where to sleep over a mere $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams
Repairs underway at the riot-damaged California Institute for Men at Chino include replacing ceramic bathroom fixtures with stainless steel and cotton bedding with flame-retardant fabrics to prevent the kind of widespread destruction that occurred there in August, state prison authorities said Tuesday. In a report on lessons learned from the Aug. 8 riot that injured 249 prisoners and eight staffers, investigators with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation praised staff response to the violent disturbance for preventing escapes and fatalities.
NEWS
May 15, 1991 | KATHERINE CORCORAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The inventor of one of the sexual revolution's most popular accessories isn't exactly what you'd expect. Sure, Charlie Hall was a graduate student living in Haight-Ashbury in 1968 when he developed a water bed in a design class. But there's not a beaded curtain, bong or crushed velvet anything in his modern ranch-style residence on 35 acres north of San Francisco. Hall is more likely to discuss the "surface tension ratio of mattress size to containing frame" than free love.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1992
Karen Ingram, Coordinator, Conejo Valley Winter Shelter I think the numbers speak for themselves. Obviously, if we're only providing a couple hundred seasonal beds and we've got a couple thousand homeless we're not addressing the total needs of the community. If there were but year-round facilities that were available to meet the needs, that would certainly eliminate the need for the temporary programs. But you've got to address some of the underlying causes of homelessness, you can't just build a shelter.
HOME & GARDEN
January 12, 2006 | Avital Binshtock, Special to The Times
RANDY Robinson of Simi Valley always knew that he snored, but he had no idea how heavily until he married Angel three years ago. "It was getting so bad that she either had to sleep with earplugs or outside on the couch," he says. For her part, Angel didn't complain. She just stuck earplugs in and sometimes slept in the living room. Then she started waking up with bruises from his involuntary, nighttime kicks. The Robinsons are hardly alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
A man hearing voices walked into the emergency room of downtown's California Hospital Medical Center on a recent night and said he wanted to hurt somebody. Doctors gave him medication, put him in a hospital bed and called the Los Angeles County Mental Health Department. A mental health worker placed the patient — who had a history of schizophrenia — on a psychiatric hold. But despite multiple attempts to find somewhere to treat him, he spent 3 1/2 days in the emergency room. With a sharp decrease in psychiatric beds and with mental health staffs spread thin across the state, emergency rooms increasingly have become costly and ineffective baby-sitting services for mentally disturbed patients in crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Of the three county-run hospitals with emergency rooms, Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center is the only one too small to meet patient demand, according to an independent draft report prepared for the Board of Supervisors. At least 97 new beds already are needed at the $1.02-billion hospital that opened less than two years ago, according to the report. In contrast, the report obtained by the Los Angeles Times found that the county's two other hospitals with emergency rooms have the space, but not the money, to add additional beds to meet patient demand.
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