Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBee Movie Movie
IN THE NEWS

Bee Movie Movie

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 12, 2007 | Kimi Yoshino, Times Staff Writer
Jerry Seinfeld's pesky little "Bee Movie" emerged as queen of the box office over the weekend, stinging the Harlem drug lords of "American Gangster" and knocking the critically acclaimed crime thriller into second place. "Bee" also buzzed past Warner Bros.' new Christmas comedy "Fred Claus," starring Vince Vaughn, and took a bite out of Hollywood heavyweights Tom Cruise, Robert Redford and Meryl Streep, whose highly promoted political drama "Lions for Lambs" placed fourth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 21, 2007 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
Shades of darkness differentiate "Antz," the 1998 DreamWorks Animation movie starring Woody Allen as an ant, and "Bee Movie," the 2007 DreamWorks Animation's movie starring Jerry Seinfeld as a bee. "Antz," DreamWorks' first big animated feature, was practically a polemic against the evils of iron-fisted totalitarianism, with Allen -- whose character first appears on an ant therapist's couch -- moving from existential anonymity to unlikely heroism.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2007 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
A Florida company that makes honey-based skin-care products filed a federal lawsuit Thursday against DreamWorks SKG and Paramount Pictures, alleging that their use of the slogan "Give Bees a Chance" to market Jerry Seinfeld's new animated comedy "Bee Movie" infringes on its trademarked slogan.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2007 | Kimi Yoshino, Times Staff Writer
Jerry Seinfeld's pesky little "Bee Movie" emerged as queen of the box office over the weekend, stinging the Harlem drug lords of "American Gangster" and knocking the critically acclaimed crime thriller into second place. "Bee" also buzzed past Warner Bros.' new Christmas comedy "Fred Claus," starring Vince Vaughn, and took a bite out of Hollywood heavyweights Tom Cruise, Robert Redford and Meryl Streep, whose highly promoted political drama "Lions for Lambs" placed fourth.
NEWS
November 21, 2007 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
Shades of darkness differentiate "Antz," the 1998 DreamWorks Animation movie starring Woody Allen as an ant, and "Bee Movie," the 2007 DreamWorks Animation's movie starring Jerry Seinfeld as a bee. "Antz," DreamWorks' first big animated feature, was practically a polemic against the evils of iron-fisted totalitarianism, with Allen -- whose character first appears on an ant therapist's couch -- moving from existential anonymity to unlikely heroism.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2007 | Sheigh Crabtree, Times Staff Writer
Not only is Jerry Seinfeld well versed in the mysterious vanishing bee situation, he claims to know the root cause. "The thing is," Seinfeld says in a hushed voice at DreamWorks Animation in Glendale, "we're not even supposed to talk about it. But DreamWorks is behind all that. It's a publicity stunt. We vacuumed out all the hives all over the world. We're just trying to get bees in the news! Free publicity is the way we look at it." As if Seinfeld and DreamWorks need any free publicity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2007 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
A Florida company that makes honey-based skin-care products filed a federal lawsuit Thursday against DreamWorks SKG and Paramount Pictures, alleging that their use of the slogan "Give Bees a Chance" to market Jerry Seinfeld's new animated comedy "Bee Movie" infringes on its trademarked slogan.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2007 | Sheigh Crabtree, Times Staff Writer
Not only is Jerry Seinfeld well versed in the mysterious vanishing bee situation, he claims to know the root cause. "The thing is," Seinfeld says in a hushed voice at DreamWorks Animation in Glendale, "we're not even supposed to talk about it. But DreamWorks is behind all that. It's a publicity stunt. We vacuumed out all the hives all over the world. We're just trying to get bees in the news! Free publicity is the way we look at it." As if Seinfeld and DreamWorks need any free publicity.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|