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NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Remember that Jamie Foxx song "Blame It (On the Alcohol)"? If not, perhaps it's just as well, because scientists say that even the taste of beer (without the intoxicating effects of alcohol) can trigger that flow of striatal dopamine in the brain. The findings, published online Monday in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, "demonstrate for the first time the important role of an alcoholic drink's flavor, absent alcohol's pharmacological effects," the study authors wrote.  Researchers from the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis asked 49 men to try two beverages: Gatorade and their preferred beer.
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NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Watch this beer commercial. Even if you hate beer. Even if you hate commercials. Just watch it. Here's the setup: A bunch of dimwitted thieves end up trying to celebrate their ill-gotten gains at the worst possible place in town -- the local cop bar. A low-speed chase ensues, as no one wants to lose hold of their frosty Carlton Draught. Along the way, the commercial pays sudsy homage to every hackneyed, action-movie chase sequence in the books.  Workers transporting a large pane of glass in the middle of the chase?
FOOD
January 26, 2013 | By Charles Perry
Boulevard Brewing in Kansas City, Mo., makes some broad-shouldered ales. This one is in the style of a Belgian tripel, and it's a big one. It pours dark red amber with a high head and a super-malty nose full of aromas of dried fruit, specifically of figs. It positively paints the palate with malt sweetness, while the hop level is relatively moderate, only 22 International Bittering Units. The hops do come forward a little (even physically forward, toward the tip of the tongue). eventually drying up the long, sweet finish.
FOOD
February 9, 2013 | By Charles Perry
Beer made with roasted malts is going to remind you of other roasted flavors such as coffee. Some brewers actually throw in some coffee to punch up that quality, but the combination doesn't necessarily work. Here's a case in which it really does, and I don't think the reason is some beer equivalent of terroir (the brewery is in Kona, Hawaii, and uses local Kona coffee). The brewers just had a larger effect in mind than extra roastiness. Like any porter, it pours very dark brown with a high tan head.
SPORTS
April 11, 2013 | By Melissa Rohlin
Apparently baseball and beer really do go together. During a game between the Mariners and the Astros on Wednesday, a Mariners fan was faced with a very tough decision. While holding a draft beer in his hand (and those things are mighty expensive at ballparks), a fly ball was hit in his direction. What to do? Drop the beer and attempt to catch the ball? Keep the drink and let a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity fly past him? Faced with a split-second decision, this fan decided to have the best of worlds.
WORLD
June 24, 2010 | From Reuters
A drunk driver trapped after overturning his car cracked open another can of beer while he waited for emergency crews to rescue him, a New Zealand court was told. Paul Nigel Sneddon, 47, pleaded guilty to careless driving and drunken driving after being nearly three times over the legal alcohol limit in a district court in the city of Palmerston North, the Dominion Post newspaper reported on Wednesday. Police found Sneddon, a former baker, trapped in his overturned Ford Laser on June 1, drinking a can of beer after he failed to take a corner properly and crashed through a wooden barrier, flipping his vehicle.
FOOD
August 11, 2011 | By Charles Perry, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the Middle Ages, brewers sometimes stoked their brew kettles by throwing in rocks that had been heated red-hot. They were on to something, as Port shows in this intriguing dark lager, a collaboration with Bend Brewing in Bend, Ore. What do the hot rocks do? They caramelize and even scorch some of the malt, giving a new layer of browned flavor — not just the caramel, chocolate or molasses notes (there is a tiny amount of the last, a huge amount of the first) but also a little of that burnt sugar taste we learned to love the first time we toasted a marshmallow.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By John Verive
Brewers have long used anything and everything they can as a source of fermentable sugars in their mix of brewing grains -- called the "grist", but malted barley is by far the favored grain. Barley is full of the enzymes needed to properly convert the starches contained in its kernels to the sugars that the yeast can eat, and it's fibrous husk eases the brewing process. Wheat is another very popular ingredient that is important to many styles of beer, but it is better suited to bread-baking than it is to brewing.
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