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SCIENCE
May 29, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Move over C3PO, Cornell University computer science geeks have created a robot that can tell if you want a beer and pour it for you. Barristas also may want to wake up and smell the coffee too. This robot can guess whether students are hankering for java and pour it for them. Kodiak the robot was as handy with a lager as with a latte, could open refrigerator and microwave doors and even tidy up, say the human robotics researchers. In tests, the hard-wired humanoid correctly anticipated a student's next move between 57% and 82% of the time, depending on how far into the future it was "anticipating.
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SPORTS
April 11, 2013 | By Melissa Rohlin
Apparently baseball and beer really do go together. During a game between the Mariners and the Astros on Wednesday, a Mariners fan was faced with a very tough decision. While holding a draft beer in his hand (and those things are mighty expensive at ballparks), a fly ball was hit in his direction. What to do? Drop the beer and attempt to catch the ball? Keep the drink and let a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity fly past him? Faced with a split-second decision, this fan decided to have the best of worlds.
WORLD
June 24, 2010 | From Reuters
A drunk driver trapped after overturning his car cracked open another can of beer while he waited for emergency crews to rescue him, a New Zealand court was told. Paul Nigel Sneddon, 47, pleaded guilty to careless driving and drunken driving after being nearly three times over the legal alcohol limit in a district court in the city of Palmerston North, the Dominion Post newspaper reported on Wednesday. Police found Sneddon, a former baker, trapped in his overturned Ford Laser on June 1, drinking a can of beer after he failed to take a corner properly and crashed through a wooden barrier, flipping his vehicle.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By John Verive
Brewers have long used anything and everything they can as a source of fermentable sugars in their mix of brewing grains -- called the "grist", but malted barley is by far the favored grain. Barley is full of the enzymes needed to properly convert the starches contained in its kernels to the sugars that the yeast can eat, and it's fibrous husk eases the brewing process. Wheat is another very popular ingredient that is important to many styles of beer, but it is better suited to bread-baking than it is to brewing.
FOOD
August 11, 2011 | By Charles Perry, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the Middle Ages, brewers sometimes stoked their brew kettles by throwing in rocks that had been heated red-hot. They were on to something, as Port shows in this intriguing dark lager, a collaboration with Bend Brewing in Bend, Ore. What do the hot rocks do? They caramelize and even scorch some of the malt, giving a new layer of browned flavor — not just the caramel, chocolate or molasses notes (there is a tiny amount of the last, a huge amount of the first) but also a little of that burnt sugar taste we learned to love the first time we toasted a marshmallow.
FOOD
November 25, 2010 | By Charles Perry, Special to the Los Angeles Times
  Green Flash Brewing Barleywine 2010 Barleywines are typically sweet and malty with plenty of hops for balance. This one, from a India Pale Ale specialist based in San Diego, leads with the hops. It pours dark amber with an attractive nose of pine and oranges. In the mouth, it's a riot of flavors with the hops inexorably knuckling the malt under. The finish is medium long and hoppy all the way. It can stand up to strongly flavored foods such as curries. One thing all barleywines have in common is a high alcohol level.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Watch this beer commercial. Even if you hate beer. Even if you hate commercials. Just watch it. Here's the setup: A bunch of dimwitted thieves end up trying to celebrate their ill-gotten gains at the worst possible place in town -- the local cop bar. A low-speed chase ensues, as no one wants to lose hold of their frosty Carlton Draught. Along the way, the commercial pays sudsy homage to every hackneyed, action-movie chase sequence in the books.  Workers transporting a large pane of glass in the middle of the chase?
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